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Discussion Starter #1
I decided to add some spare fuses to my contingency pack that I carry in the trunk. All of the fuses in the main fuse box next to the glovebox are common 10A or 15A standard blade fuses. The two 40A fuses under the seat are 40A blade fuses - still standard size. Neither of the auto parts stores in my neighborhood have them on the shelf. These are critical fuses. One is the electrical system main fuse, the other is the main ECVT fuse. If my local Autozone and O'Reilly's auto parts store don't have them on hand, I can't imagine finding them at a convenience store in some small town when out touring. :shock:

O'Reilly's is ordering me a 5 pack from their warehouse - they should have them tomorrow.

I had not looked at the blade fuse aisle in an auto parts store for a long time. In addition to the standard size blade fuses that the Burgman uses, there are now "mini" blade fuses and humongous sized blade fuses. There are also "smart" blade fuses that light up when they blow out. I guess that makes it easier to spot the blown fuse.
 

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Interesting Paul.
I picked up some spare 10s and 40s the other day at my local Canadian Tire store.
The only 40s I saw were big ones.

I would guess from what you said they are not the right ones then?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
lilleyen said:
Interesting Paul.
I picked up some spare 10s and 40s the other day at my local Canadian Tire store.
The only 40s I saw were big ones.

I would guess from what you said they are not the right ones then?
No they are not the right ones. I did the same thing, and had to return them. On my '03 if you lift the seat from the right side and look down, you see the white plastic covers that house those fuses. I imagine it would be the same on your '05 AN650A.
 

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Your machine already has spare fuses. I did the same last weekend in purchasing fuses. I didnt purchase the 40's beacuse they looked too big. When I checked the 40's size I found that inside the white plastic holder it is actually a spare.. Guess Suzuki was planning ahead.
 

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Neat.
I found when I blew the charging socket fuse on my burg (with my cages tire inflator), that there was a spare 10A fuse there too.

The Zuke does it right!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I picked up my 5 pack of 40 amp fuses this morning. $2 and small change. Hopefully I'll never need them, but they don't take up much space in my contingency kit either.
 

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$2.00 and change for 5?
I paid nearly $4.00 for one up here.

The big ones. It's going back.
 

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Can you share with the rest of us what exactly is in your contingency pack? I'm sure we should all be making something like that up. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Harold1 said:
Can you share with the rest of us what exactly is in your contingency pack? I'm sure we should all be making something like that up. Thanks in advance.
Canyon Dancer harness (in case I need a piggyback ride and the person with the truck doesn't have appropriate tie downs)
Supplemental tool kit (Cruztools - includes tape also)
Flashlight
Stop & Go tire plug kit
12v electric air pump
Good dial type air pressure gauge
Spare Fuses
Small set of Jumper Cables (Bitty Booster)
Snake & Insect bite kit (I should add a small First Aid kit)

I carry my phone of course, and I have roadside assistance via both AAA and Progressive Insurance.

When I tour, I usually carry my service manual.

Fairly basic stuff. I've never had a problem on the road. I don't carry oil - you can buy that at any convenience store & I've never had to add oil between changes anyway.
 

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pauljo wrote:
On my '03 if you lift the seat from the right side and look down, you see the white plastic covers that house those fuses. I imagine it would be the same on your '05 AN650A..

Not so on my 2005 AN650. The fuses seem to be wll hidden behind the tupperware somewhere on the left front side. It would be nice if the Service Manual gave a hint on how to access them. Wouldn't you think they'd put fuses where they are readily accesable?

Jerry
 

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Those two fuses under the seat are the main fuse for the bike and the starter relay fuse.

The rest (at least most of them) are under the dash panel just to the left of the bigger glove box door.
Open that door, and you will have access to a screw which holds the left panel in.
The air filter is in there as well, underneath the fuses, as I recall.
 

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Thanks for the tip on where the fuse box is. I sure couldn't tell from the picture in the Service Manual.

Jerry
 

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You're welcome Jerry.
Glad I could help.
I've finally reached a point where I can contribute, as well as glean.

Lord knows, I've received a lot of help and info on this site since I stumbled across it last fall.

I do have the big service manual, and it sometimes leaves me scratching my head. Sometimes it is very clear, and sometimes it glosses over the "details". :(
 

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Rick,
I think the Suzuki Service Manual is not written for us DIY types. It also leaves me scratching my head too. LOL

My motto is "When everything else fails, read the instructions!" Unfortunately the instructions in the SM are often not too understandable. You suppose something is lost in the translation?

Jerry :roll:
 

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Could possibly be a translation issue, or they could be writing it for service techs. and mechanics.
As bad as it can be, I'm glad I've got it. It's worth the money just for chapter 9 alone. That's the one that tells how all the tupperware comes off.
I do know there are dozens of incorrectly spelled words in the book.
 

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It's not a big issue for me.

I won't be using the manual much, only doing minor servicing, changing fluids, maybe plugs and air filters, topping up brake fluid etc.

I just like to know how things work or are out together, and have some general knowledge of why everything works.

Any really important stuff, I'll leave to the experts.

I flip through it occasionally, put markers in some pages, etc.
I find interesting, but I won't be doing much wrenching.
Besides, I'm too old and stiff, to really get into it.
It's not as much fun as I remember it was, when I was young and full of energy.

Might be easier with one of those lift tables like they use at the dealers, having everything at table level, instead of crawling around on the ground.
BUT, they're EXPENSIVE, especially for just doing oil changes.

My plan is just to baby it, and ride it! :twisted:

I will keep a close eye on my tire pressures, and wear, wash it and wax it, change it's fluids as required for longevity, and try a little harder to stop dropping it. :)

My dealer has proved to be a good one, the service dept is reliable, so I'll let them do the major service interval things.

The manual is just my security blanket.
 

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I'm not really very much of a mechanic myself. But I do like to know as much as I can (understand, that is) about my Burgman. So far, I don't know if my dealer has a wrench that knows the AN650 well. The dealer who I had bought my Silver Wing from in 2001 had no one who knew anything about that bike. The first "accessory" I bought for both rides was the official Service Manual.
BTW: Harbor Freight has been selling the lift table type repair stands for $299 plus shipping and I doubt if they can be bought any cheaper then that. I also am getting too long in the tooth to do all the wrenching laying on my back, etc., but so far I can't seem to justify buying one.

Jerry
 
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