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Discussion Starter #1
OK- here it is, boys. The question I have to know the answer to is this: If I ride my machine proper (2007 650 Executive), change its fluids when they need to be changed and use good as or what the book calls for oil and grease as gas, and don't just ride the ever loving **** out of it everywhere that I go can I get 100,000 AND MORE out it just by riding it along at a nice safe and peaceful clip at around 65-75 mph some of the time but mostly much lower than that. Idaho back roads where I am going to be riding along at 40-50mph all day. I will try not to center punch any large deer or God forbid an Elk. I just want to ride it a lot and keep riding it for many years in mind numbing happiness. My Honda PC800 is now on its way to 100,000 miles and it has never had ANY major breakdown or so much as a taillight or anything. I put gas in, change the oil and filter every 5k and spoon rubber onto it and that's it. That's all. No tranny issues, no rear end or clutch issues- nothing. Fork seals, brake pads, (rear shoes are OEM and doing fine). Can I expect this from my bike? I have put 7000 miles on it in less than 10 months but also ride my Goldwing a lot more than that. My PC and my KLR not as much. Comfort thing you know.

So this is it- what is the predicted distance that I should be able to make on my wonderful 2007 Exe before something hand grenades in it? 40 thou? 60? 80? any clue at all what the average 650 Burgman will go before it needs several thousands of dollars in repairs to keep it running.

As always, all replies are appreciated.
 

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If I knew the answer two that question I would use that gift to win the lottery, lol. That said its very likely the belt at least will need to be replaced once possibly in the 65,000-85,000 mile range as an educated guess.
 

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My case, '03, 41,000 miles.

Cost for Repairs, other than maintenance.

Clutch $200
Cam Chain tension er, $120

I still have it and ride it.
 

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At 7,000 in 10 months come back in a decade and let us know ;)
True dat!

As with most things, the bike is only as strong as its weakest link; in the Burgman 650s case, for all intents and purposes, that would be the tranny belt. So look up that discussion. Prevailing wisdom I've read is 50k-100k on k5+ bikes.

But as Mac pointed out, at 700 miles per month, you've got a long time before you even need to start to worry.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
At 7,000 in 10 months come back in a decade and let us know ;)
Considering that from November to March it didn't get ridden at all I still think that is quite a bit. I put over 1,000 miles on it in less than a week earlier this month after I had my new smooooooth CT put on the back.

I guess all I can do is hope for the best. If I can limit myself to 10K a year then I should be good for hopefully another 7-8,000 miles before anything expensive needs to be fixed.
 

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Well my 07 650 Exec went 84,000 miles before the belt in the CVT wore out. Prior to that all I did to it was normal scheduled maintenance. I did have to change the rear shocks at about 64,000 miles. I'm now at 109,236 miles and I've also had to replace a valve in the head and the stator.

As for how I ride it. I don't baby it but I don't abuse it either. It's seen some 500+ miles days running at 75 to 80 all day. It's seen some day's spent center stand dragging in the twisties. It's also seen some all day cruising at 50 to 55 on back roads. It's even seen some 25 to 30 miles runs down gravel and dirt roads. One thing I don't do on it much is ride in city traffic or even on city streets.

Can I guarantee yours will do the same. Nope. I have a friend who bought a 650 Exec at about the same time I bought mine. A bearing in the CVT on it failed at around 50,000 miles requiring a total CVT rebuild. That same bike is now on it's second owner and has 95,000+ miles on it. I helped that second owner replace the belt in the CVT last month.

I also have another friend that has an 05 650 with 65,000+ miles on it that has never had anything but normal maintenance done to it. Another friend put 69,000 on an 05 before trading it off on an 08 again only doing normal maintenance on it.
 

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There is no way you’ll get any true statistical information on the Burgman 650 or for that matter any other 2 wheel vehicle . While there are bikes like the Goldwings , the Honda PC and some others that have gone to the extremes , most bikes will never see the odometers get much past 25K . I personally did a little survey on a Craigslist mash list (most of the country was represented) . Out of 100 Burgman 650’s the average miles was just over 10k , only one had + 30K .

If you check Craigslist for bikes that are 30 to 40 years old , you will be hard pressed to find one with over 50K on the clock . Most of the 30 year old bikes I see for sale , on average have about 15K on the clock , that is like an average of 500 miles a year . I have to laugh when I hear people on these forums worry about how long their bikes are going to last , then a year or less later they sell it after putting maybe 2000 miles on it . (not this OP)

One thing you can be sure of , the Burgman 650 longevity wise is no Honda Goldwing or PC , but either is any scooter for that matter . That said , if you are looking for cost effective you don’t have to look any further than the 650 Burg . If you are patient and a good negotiator you can buy a low mileage 650 for 3K , then if and when it blows up you can get $1,500 for it as a parts bike . So you are pretty much guaranteed that you cannot lose more than $1,500 . Personally I don’t know of another bike that will give a rider as much pleasure for $1,500 as the 650 Burg . NONE !!!
IMHO the 650 Burg is a gift from the scooter Gods , REALLY ! In other words the 650 Burg can be very cost effective to own , just not in the same way a Goldwing or a PC .

In the “cost effective” department whether you are paying a dealer or fixing it yourself , IMO it is not cost effective to fix a blown CVT in one . Now if you are a good mechanic and you like that sort of thing , then do it . But even then , if you figure your time as money it’s still not cost effective .

That’s my 2 cents . TheReaper!
 

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I like that analysis Reaper. I got my 650 for $3300 with 3k on the clock.. If I get 50k out of it, I'll call it a win and retire the old girl. Anything more than 50k, win-win.
 

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Only thing I can say about the analysis is it depends on what goes wrong in the CVT. If it is just the belt and you do the work yourself you are only talking about $400 in parts and a days worth of labor using the frame lifting method to pull the CVT. That is pretty cheap for a few more years of riding. Roughly the cost of a couple of rear tires + mounting and balancing. Of course that is dependent on you doing the work yourself. If your paying someone to do it then your probably out $1,500+ on a belt change.
 

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most bikes will never see the odometers get much past 25K .
I have a 2008 Yamaha Zuma 50cc 2-stroke with 27500 miles on it, with the original top end and still runs great.

The key is to do the maintenance!

You can go the other way however. A bike that does more sitting than running will not last as long as a regularly used one. Sure they may need to be parked for the winter but if properly prepped that isn't a problem. What is a problem is when somebody gets a ride and then uses it a little and then parks it for 4 years before selling it.
 

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Only thing I can say about the analysis is it depends on what goes wrong in the CVT. If it is just the belt and you do the work yourself you are only talking about $400 in parts and a days worth of labor using the frame lifting method to pull the CVT. That is pretty cheap for a few more years of riding. Roughly the cost of a couple of rear tires + mounting and balancing. Of course that is dependent on you doing the work yourself. If your paying someone to do it then your probably out $1,500+ on a belt change.
If some one suggested to me that 1% of all the bikers on the planet had the skills and the where with all , like a lift , the tools and the room to do it , and the patience and or time to do it , I would consider that 1% suggestion an exaggeration at best . I know you can do it , and I know I could with a little assistance from you guys here , and some physical help on this end cuz of my bad back .

I've had the plastics off and completely disassembled an 03 rolling chassis down to splitting the cases , so I pretty much understand this beast now . Even knowing all that I wouldn't do it . Look at all the guys here and on other forums like this , who have trouble with an oil change , most people don't really ride them that much , much less work on them especially a complete tear down like this .

Even if were a blown belt I would still sell it , for the simple reason that blown belt might be a symptom of another problem . For what you can buy a bike for now in the U.S. , to me it makes no sense getting into tearing one of these down . Especially when there are so many picker types out there who are willing to buy them .

But that's me ..........TheReaper!
 

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Even if were a blown belt I would still sell it , for the simple reason that blown belt might be a symptom of another problem .
Having now done 2 belt replacements, I don't think that just a belt going is very likely to damage anything else. On the flip side, something else going wrong can take out a belt. If something else is wrong you are going to see it when you open up the case. I've now put 24,000 miles on mine since I replaced the belt. Pretty good investment if you ask me.

If some one suggested to me that 1% of all the bikers on the planet had the skills and the where with all , like a lift , the tools and the room to do it , and the patience and or time to do it , I would consider that 1% suggestion an exaggeration at best .
I think your 1% number is low. Way more than 1% of the folks I know around here do all the work on their own bikes including things like engine overhauls. Anyone that would tackle that would certainly tackle taking the CVT apart. Compared to splitting the crankcase, splitting the CVT is a snap. Maybe it's just a Texas thing but I don't think so.

Look at the threads on this board about rebuilding engines on the early model 400. On a pure cost verses benefit analysis that would make less sense than replacing the belt in the 650 CVT. It's way more work too.
Yet people seem to be willing to do it.
 

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I'm the guy Buffalo mentioned that bought our friends Executive with 94k. This is my third Burgman and it runs just as strong and is as dependable as my other ones. We did do a CVT belt replacement recently so it should be good for another 50+k. The only thing semi-major left for me to do in terms of cost is the stator. Craig and I have some of the highest mileage Burgman's out there and just follow our posts and see how far we can go with our bikes. I'd have no problem or concerns hopping on my bike and riding to Colorado or New England.
 

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I think your 1% number is low. Way more than 1% of the folks I know around here do all the work on their own bikes including things like engine overhauls. Anyone that would tackle that would certainly tackle taking the CVT apart. Compared to splitting the crankcase, splitting the CVT is a snap. Maybe it's just a Texas thing but I don't think so.
Agree,

We also have our share of gear heads here as well.
 

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First off I really admire you guys who can successfully tear one of these totally down then rebuild them and put them back together and actually have them run well . And your willingness to help us all is admirable . My life's experiences and skills lay elsewhere . I do a lot of work on my bikes , mostly relatively simple things and above all that my back will tolerate .

I have a neighbor who is fresh out of the military that's not working yet and is pretty good with a wrench , so he helps me on the bikes and guy stuff around the house . I pay him about $15 an hour so it helps him and me too . My back is good for an hour or two before it gets to inflamed at best .

Now if I had a Buffalo , a LaDude or an MJR type living next door I might tackle it just for the experience . I would really like to see it done from the beginning of the tear down to it up and running again . With my luck or skill level if I did it all by myself it would never run again :lol:.

TheReaper!
 

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Now if I had a Buffalo , a LaDude or an MJR type living next door I might tackle it just for the experience . I would really like to see it done from the beginning of the tear down to it up and running again . With my luck or skill level if I did it all by myself it would never run again :lol:
And any one of us would be glad to help but I can understand as Harry Callahan once said "Man's got to know his limitations". :D

I have a 2008 Yamaha Zuma 50cc 2-stroke with 27500 miles on it, with the original top end and still runs great.

The key is to do the maintenance!

You can go the other way however. A bike that does more sitting than running will not last as long as a regularly used one. Sure they may need to be parked for the winter but if properly prepped that isn't a problem. What is a problem is when somebody gets a ride and then uses it a little and then parks it for 4 years before selling it.
I think the point the poster was asking was for a prediction on the unexpected type of failure that some of us have had be it engine, CVT, electrical, etc...
 
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