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Discussion Starter #1
It began inauspiciously, with my you-beauty $40 blind-hole bearing puller slipping out more than 6 times removing the left side Rear wheel bearing - and I was using most of my strength on big shifters to adjust/tension the tool to grip the bearing. :mad:

But I persevered, and it came out. :eek: I decided to deal with one thing at a time and to install that side's new bearing immediately. I greased the hub and bearing and tapped it in using the universal "Tiny" ball-pein hammer and the biggest socket I have - a 1/2" drive 32mm. It's really borderline too small, but I had checked meticulously with verniers and the socket would just rest on the inner parts of the outer bearing race. I retrospect I should have simply used a pin punch. I checked after the bearing bottomed out and all looked good. Everything going to plan so far. :D

Right side removal began with several slippages by the fitting I was using with the slide hammer. Bearing was not moving (I was checking with verniers). Finally, one of the 4 legs on the tool SNAPPED. Great! :cwm10: Back to my usual methods then...dug out a ~45cm 3/8 extension bar with 13mm socket on the end and that got things moving again even just using the tiny hammer (it took a LOT of little hits). No major drama.

The process has now taken a little longer than I'd wanted, and I'm slightly impatient. :rolleyes: As I start tapping the new bearing in I start moving the socket I'm drifting it with from side to side where I'm hitting - instead of just leaving it loosely central like I successfully had with the previous bearing. I could have also easily used a simple pin punch for no real extra inconvenience. :( The bearing bottoms out on the seat and I give it about three light taps 90 degrees apart just to be sure. I take the drift/socket out, only to find I have apparently put at least some pressure on the bearing seal itself at some point (the balls/cage) for one or several taps of the tiny hammer. Ahhhhhhhhh!!!! :(

I don't think it's bad, but obviously any amount is not really acceptable. If you saw that after a shop had done it, you'd not be happy. It's a dent in the seal running around 90 degrees. I'm probably going to just leave it. I suspect it did not take a major direct hit, but rather just indirect pressure while I was trying to seat and hit the socket on the opposite side. I was not using major, heavy blows with even a small hammer - more like many, many small taps from a tiny hammer. I realise that still doesn't mean I'll get away with it.

There's more too > This is not really anything to do with me (much) afaic. The spacer is not as loose as it was between the bearings now. You can still move it easily if you stick a 3/8 extension in there and lever it around, but you can't move it with your finger like you could before. I think there is some microscopic difference in bearing shell widths....I just focussed on seating the outer shells of the bearing, but now it seems like there's some minimal amount of preload from the spacer pressing on the inner races. It can't be much, because like I said you can easily lever the spacer around, but the bearings are tight to move by one finger.

I have put the axle and spacers in and picked up the axle with a hand either side, rolled the wheel on the ground to get it spinning, and it will spin freely for 5-6 rotations before stopping. That's not too bad. I was pressing the spacers in against the inner races to make sure it was the bearing turning and not just the bearing race 'spinning' on the axle.

I do think it's all okay, even if perhaps not absolutely perfect. When I pick the wheel up with a single finger in either bearing inner race and spin it, it also feels dead smooth - until the wheel gets very slow at which point you can feel the 'preload' turning into definite notchiness....which worries me a little.

In any case, my tool is broken and with the reduced movement of the spacer inside the wheel, I don't think I can get a drift to grip the inner race to remove this one bearing even if I wanted to. There is not as much room as there was before...although technically the races and the spacer should butt up tightly together once you've torqued the axle nut, anyway.

Like I said I think it's all okay...it just did not proceed or end 100% as I had hoped. Any suggestions or thoughts? Sorry for the long post. If I'd just gone slower with a pin punch, I would not be now agonising over what amounts to a slight degree of ham-fistedness.
 

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Well, if I were starting out and found an old bearing to have that "notchiness", I'd say it needed to be replaced. I think the only reason you don't face that same conclusion is due to the effort you've expended to that point. I hate to say it but, I think it's time for a do-over:(
 

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Discussion Starter #3
well I have slept on it. :sleepy4:
That is a very good point. Effort expended to date should not influence the decision.

The thing is, I think the notchiness is not due to any kind of damage that may or may not have happened to the right side bearing. I think the same result would be present had I slowly pressed the bearings in with the perfect tool. The outer races are properly seated, yet there seems to be marginally less - or zero - clearance between inner races and spacer.

I shouldn't have had to be monitoring how close I was getting to bottoming out on the spacer...and given that the spacer still moves, (with very minor lever, not finger) it must be JUST touching, like it ultimately will anyway.

Arguably, if you pressed the bearings in LESS far, leaving them turning independently and nicely by your finger - by the time you torque up the axle nut you could have the SAME preload I now seem to have as the spacers try to push the inner bearing races toward the middle spacer. That's just got to happen. I'm just saying, having it all spin nicely off the bike is not at all necessarily replicating installation on the swing arm.

As is, both bearing inner races and spacer have to now turn together when attempting to turn just one bearing by finger - which I assume is what they have to do anyway with the axle nut torqued - but that turning by finger force alone being much harder than it was before has me a little fazed. They are Nachi bearings from Japan.

I really didn't hammer away after the outer races seated, and didn't use some big hammer. I suspect that if there was adjustable bearing preload like on an older car, we would be talking about a very, very small amount of unwanted preload - almost zero - that might be considered okay for new bearings.

I realise I have asked for advice and am now trying to justify myself doing nothing more. :rolleyes:

I could check it again after a short ride, but of course the odds are the bearings WILL loosen up, and you could call that seating, or bedding in...or accelerated wear caused by poor installation. I think if it frees up after a really short ride, then hopefully no major wear took place.

Aside from the slip-up of a bit of pressure ending up momentarily on the seal/cage, nothing really went wrong. And for that dint on the seal to be there, 3/4 of the socket must have been pressing on the outer race when that happened. Yes, it's not brilliant and should not happen, but I think I have done mostly the right thing and have little more than cosmetic damage. If I was entering Paris Dakar, I would change it, but I'm not.

I'll take it as a reminder to slow down, concentrate, use the exact right tool when it really counts or don't do it at all. With the FD oil seal I installed - that would have been a LOT harder without the almost perfect sized PVC pipe to press it in with.....and if I wanted to use a socket like that on these bearing, I should have gone and bought the next size up socket for $20.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, I can feel the weight of 111 disaproving, shaking heads ;). I haven't taken the wheel off to check, but I guess once you've so much as touched the seal over the balls with your installation tool, you're in uncharted territory, and I just don't need any more drama than I've currently got in my life.

I've bought new bearings, a new (better quality) tool with only the two collet sizes that I need, (which I got stuck on the old bearing trying it out without even the taper bolt installed! > no more slipping!) and gone to a local fastener shop 5 minutes away and bought the necessary rod, nuts, washers to press them in with ($6). I'll do it sometime in the near future probably, when I get a little free time.

For the record, my old, thick-walled 32mm multihex socket is 43.6mm OD (bearing is 47mm) and just looking at it on the old bearing, there is plenty of contact on the outer race if you keep it even remotely central like I did with the first bearing. I made a dumb decision to deviate from that. And if I'd just ceased tapping the instant I heard the bearing bottom out (on either spacer or hub, makes no difference in the end), I'm pretty sure I would not have had the little bit of unwanted preload. Between the two small errors, I feel I have compromised the extreme precision of the Japanese manufactuers...to what degree, I don't know, but it's within my power to eliminate it by doing it again. Only real cost was $22 of bearings. I'll try not to treat this set like I'm bashing in a trailer bearing race. :rolleyes:
 

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I've bought new bearings, a new (better quality) tool with only the two collet sizes that I need, (which I got stuck on the old bearing trying it out without even the taper bolt installed! > no more slipping!) and gone to a local fastener shop 5 minutes away and bought the necessary rod, nuts, washers to press them in with ($6). I'll do it sometime in the near future probably, when I get a little free time.
I think you've made an excellent call and perhaps, avoided getting stuck in the middle of nowhere.
 

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The beauty of the Japanese language is that there is no distinction between and an 'l' and an 'r'.

Given the above post, when I think of your user name as 'one hand crapping' it makes a lot more sense. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ah so...

公案: The distinctions and categorizations that the mind so loves, and are so useful at times, are ultimately but temporary illusions...just like our bodies and personalities. Yet we cling furiously to them all. Meditate upon this and above all remember: Left hand for wiping, Right hand for eating.
 
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