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My 2 year coolant change is due on my 2011 650. Reading the service manual and LeDude's posting, both describe removing lots of the Tupperware. I had a BMW K1200LT that had the same amount of plastic covering, but someone posted a clever way of using a funnel and hose as well as disconnecting some of the bikes hoses to obviate a major body teardown.

Does anyone have a suggested way to easily change the coolant?

I was wondering if one can simply take off no more than the lower leg shield and the plastic radiator cover to drain and somehow snake a hose down to the filler cap.
 

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Well is say pulling the radiator plastics shield and the lower radiator hose though you could the radiator drain bolt. The using a funnel and hose to refill it.
 

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I recently had to replace the OEM radiator with a new after market replacement (I'm here in China and getting an OEM imported would have been much worse than day-light-robbery). Thankfully someone must have needed a new one, so a local company has made a copy of the Suzuki Burgman OEM for a whole lot less money (typical China, which has worked in my favour in this case).

I had to remove all the tupperware to effect the swap out of the old radiator for the new one. But that did allow me to determine that you would or should not really need to remove any of the tupperware just to a pretty decent job of swapping out the fluids.

I'd suggest popping the bike on the centre stand on top of a piece of 4x2 or a couple of bricks or something similar just to increase the height of the Burgy, unless you have a work bench or similar. Undo the rear facing radiator drain bolt, remove the radiator cap, loosen the bottom radiator hose clip then remove the hose enough to allow free flow of fluid. The next step would be optional, since doing so would likely induce air into the "system", and that is to turn the engine over for a short period just to move any remaining fluid out of the remainder of the internal engine water jacket tunnels etc. Once done, reattach and re-tighten the bottom hose clamp and drain bolt etc. Refill with engine coolant using a hose and a funnel (I bought a plastic funnel which has an extra long flexi plastic attachment which works well for just such an application) provided the engine has been left to cool if you ran it to expel any remaining fluid. As you refill engine coolant you would need to lay from side to side, and back again to attempt to remove any air bubbles induced as above.
Once the coolant level is near the neck reattach the radiator cap and tighten. With engine running, check underneath for any leaks. Check operating temp. Both my 650K3 and 650K7 run 3 bars on the temp gauge when at full operating temp.

Don't think I've missed anything out...
 

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From many times refilling the radiator I have learned that if you unhook the small hose that runs from the top of the water pump you can get the air out of the system without much difficulty. Remove the hose then fill until coolant starts coming out of the fitting on the water pump then slip the hose back on. By using this method I didn't have any air left in the system even when I pulled the head to replace a valve.

As for removing body work, I've never tried it without the front leg shield being removed. However with the miles I put on my bike I have to do the valve check before the 2 year coolant change comes up. Since doing the valves involves pulling the radiator I am always ahead on changing the coolant. You could probably do it from the top with a funnel and hose by removing the dash but I wouldn't swear to that without trying it.
 

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Not sure why you are averse to removing tupper ware it does make the job easier and in the round the overall down time will be the same. The maintenance cover the front radiator shroud marlarkey and the right lower leg shield lets you see and access the relevant bits.
 

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The only piece of Tupperware that has to be removed is the lower leg shield.

You can try and dump the coolant within the leg shield in place, not sure how messy it would be.

I don't disconnect any hoses, just dump the old coolant, fill it from the top and cycle the
Scoot a few times to get rid of the said bubbles.

It's a thirty minutes job.
 

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Which Coolant is the best (Subjective I know) or most popular?
 

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...so a local company has made a copy of the Suzuki Burgman OEM for a whole lot less money (typical China, which has worked in my favour in this case). .
Interesting, did it fit and function like it should?

Is it a one-off or are they making them in series?

A lot of auto spares are made in China today, so why not a Burgman 650 radiator.

Once they hear it's for a motorcycle, the local recore companies smell gold and jack up the price.
 

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Interesting, did it fit and function like it should?
Is it a one-off or are they making them in series?
A lot of auto spares are made in China today, so why not a Burgman 650 radiator.
Once they hear it's for a motorcycle, the local recore companies smell gold and jack up the price.
Yes the fit was pretty much okay. I did have to remove the clip on nuts off the OEM radiator and two of the four holes in the mounting lugs didn't quite align with the mounting points on my 650K7. Nothing a short burst with the portable Milwaukee electric drill and bit didn't get sorted.
The radiators are produced and available via Taobao although the picture shows the radiator complete with the radiator guard, but actually the radiator only came supplied with the radiator cap. Typical example of what is advertised here in China as not always being the same as the real item. The other difference is that unlike the OEM, the inlet/filling neck does not slant forward, making access a little more cumbersome. That said though, once the radiator is full there's not much need to have to open the radiator cap again. I've had it in for several months and it's worked fine. Holds coolant and no leaks. Unfortunately there are no radiator recore companies perse' which simply reflects the "developing country" status rightly deserved IMO. Though things are fast changing here. All in all, I'm happy that there was an alternative as I was shocked at how much the OEM radiator was listed at the discount stores there in the USA.

As a footnote, Burgmans are not a standard available brand/model in China, but that too is changing rapidly. Most Burgmans that are here, are either smuggled in and sell via the grey/black market at still high prices or else are legally imported and sell for 2-3 times the USA MSRP!
 

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The radiator is 900 Chinese Yuan (CNY) or 147 USD


Ronayers.com: said:
17710-10G00 RADIATOR ASSY

$695.91 Offer:$508.01 ends 10/31/2013
UK price: 600 GBP (937 USD), the same as a recore costs.
Germany price 500 EUR (658 USD)
 

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Hi Paul, On your famous 3A muffler mod did you try installing the muffler with the large end outward? Is it louder? Thanks Mark
 

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"I was wondering if one can simply take off no more than the lower leg shield and the plastic radiator cover to drain and somehow snake a hose down to the filler cap."

Yes, one can.

I changed the coolant yesterday on my 2016 B650 Executive. Piece o' cake.

Remove the plastic radiator cover -- two plastic rivets on the bottom and one on each side in the wheel well. Voila -- the radiator drain plug is at the center bottom on the radiator.

Remove the left lower leg shield to access the overflow tank (remove the rubber mat and the appropriate pop rivets and screws). There is a 10 mm. bolt holding the overflow tank in place. Remove it and you can loosen the pinch clamp on the rubber hose at the bottom to literally pour the old coolant out. I poured distilled water in with a funnel to get all traces of the old stuff out.

With a piece of plastic tubing connected to a funnel, you can fill the radiator from the top (practice your pouring technique with distilled water with the drain plug removed until you're smooth as a bartender). 1200 ml of coolant goes in the radiator and 250 ml in the overflow tank. I used Super Long Life Coolant which Suzuki says is good for four years or 29,000 miles.

My local dealer wants $130 for this job plus coolant, coolant disposal, tax, etc. ... probably $150 that cost me $17 for 2 quarts of coolant. Plus I got the satisfaction of doing the work myself.

Now, if I can only figure out how to post pics here without them showing up sideways ... ;o)
 

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"

Now, if I can only figure out how to post pics here without them showing up sideways ... ;o)


Stand your computer on it's side when uploading pictures, You may hafta do it a couple times get it pointed right.:nerd
 
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"I was wondering if one can simply take off no more than the lower leg shield and the plastic radiator cover to drain and somehow snake a hose down to the filler cap."

Yes, one can.

I changed the coolant yesterday on my 2016 B650 Executive. Piece o' cake.

Remove the plastic radiator cover -- two plastic rivets on the bottom and one on each side in the wheel well. Voila -- the radiator drain plug is at the center bottom on the radiator.

Remove the left lower leg shield to access the overflow tank (remove the rubber mat and the appropriate pop rivets and screws). There is a 10 mm. bolt holding the overflow tank in place. Remove it and you can loosen the pinch clamp on the rubber hose at the bottom to literally pour the old coolant out. I poured distilled water in with a funnel to get all traces of the old stuff out.

With a piece of plastic tubing connected to a funnel, you can fill the radiator from the top (practice your pouring technique with distilled water with the drain plug removed until you're smooth as a bartender). 1200 ml of coolant goes in the radiator and 250 ml in the overflow tank. I used Super Long Life Coolant which Suzuki says is good for four years or 29,000 miles.

My local dealer wants $130 for this job plus coolant, coolant disposal, tax, etc. ... probably $150 that cost me $17 for 2 quarts of coolant. Plus I got the satisfaction of doing the work myself.

Now, if I can only figure out how to post pics here without them showing up sideways ... ;o)

I can neither confirm or deny your solution, but bear in mind that this section of the forum is for 2002-12 models. Your 2016 model is from a different generation, so this procedure may or may not be applicable.
 

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"I can neither confirm or deny your solution, but bear in mind that this section of the forum is for 2002-12 models."

I don't see how that would make any difference but you raise a good point -- I'll pay more attention to pre- and post-2012. I just googled and found an old thread because I wanted to leave the information for others.
 
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