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Discussion Starter #1
I must admit I've always struggled with the center stand. I think there's a trick to it, but the weight of the Burgman 650 stops me every time.

When parking the sidestand is fine, but i can see reasons why the center stand is preferable when cleaning the bike.
 

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Go to Utube. " how to put a scooter on a center stand" Jeremys hints and tips. that is the technique I use. He does 2 scooters. Lot of other people demonstrate their own techniques. I am sure you will find one that works for you.
 

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I must admit I've always struggled with the center stand. I think there's a trick to it, but the weight of the Burgman 650 stops me every time.

When parking the sidestand is fine, but i can see reasons why the center stand is preferable when cleaning the bike.
The machine is heavy and the center-stand seems to be a bit of an afterthought. Unlike the center-stand on the 400, it doesn't go up "clean" - it's a struggle and it seems it's not high enough (although it is).

I use it. Daily. Because I like to warm the engine up to near operating temperature before taking off; and because the fuel injection gives it a fast idle...which is doubtless hard on the clutch if the rear wheel is held stationary.

Beyond that...the center-stand is more stable if the machine is outdoors in bad weather or where it can be tampered with. Any kid can tip the machine over if it's on the side-stand; but it would take some determined pulling or hurricane-force winds to knock it over on the center-stand.
 

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I just had a incident where I parked with the side stand in a parking lot at night. I was in a hurry and did not note the declining (downward sloping) grade causing me to have the side stand to cycle backwards as the bike moved forward. Had I not been in a hurry tonight I could have taken the time to use the CENTER Stand which would have prevented this little mishap. There was little to no damage to the Plastic (tupperware) fairings but still it is quite embarrassing having to deal with hearing your bike going down as you are stepping away. From now on its Center STAND for me if parking location allows. It just requires a certain timing and putting all your weight on the foot you are using for the stand and pulling up and back on the hand rail. Practice will get you there.
 

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Yep, many times brake is required w/ side stand where it is not with centerstand. Much of the work with getting on centerstand can be accomplished with your leg. Just give some thought to how and where you park and it will be easier.
 

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Don't try to lift the bike. Just try and stand tall with your leg holding your bike for balance. During practice
PARK the rear tire on a sheet of plywood and it will help. You won't need it later.
 

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The machine is heavy and the center-stand seems to be a bit of an afterthought. Unlike the center-stand on the 400, it doesn't go up "clean" - it's a struggle and it seems it's not high enough (although it is).

I use it. Daily. Because I like to warm the engine up to near operating temperature before taking off; and because the fuel injection gives it a fast idle...which is doubtless hard on the clutch if the rear wheel is held stationary.

Beyond that...the center-stand is more stable if the machine is outdoors in bad weather or where it can be tampered with. Any kid can tip the machine over if it's on the side-stand; but it would take some determined pulling or hurricane-force winds to knock it over on the center-stand.
I disagree on all points

1) You're doing it wrong - just put your foot on the stand and your right hand at the indent in the front part of the passenger grab handle.
2) "Warming" up the engine in idle means taht the warm-up process takes longer, and meanwhile you are washing the oil film off inside the engine with unburnt fuel. Just start the engine and go, it runs without hiccups down to the freezing point (and below, probably)
3) Unless the rear shocks are badly sagging or shortened, the B650 leans nicely over and has a much wider stance on two wheels and the side stand than on just the front wheel and the relatively narrow center stands feet.
With the parking brake engaged (a shame that it can't be locked), it also can't be pushed forward off the stand.
 

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If you use the side stand all the time and you have your bike long enough chances are it WILL FALL OVER ! On a 100+ degree day I had the side stand on my Triumph go right through the pavement and fall over . A fall over on a 650 Burgman can cost around $2,500-U.S. to fix , it's your bike and your money but I would suggest you learn how to use your center stand .

TheReaper!
 

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Yep, I disagree with the above. I think, as does Suzuki, that the bike should be warmed up a bit before riding. Obviously you cant do this on the side stand. Using your foot will make a center stand lift easier. I think it will also get you more gas in the tank. Just takes some practice.

On an incline you will need to latch parking brake on side stand. Not necessary on centerstand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Reaper, thanks.

BTW, what part of Michigan are you from?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yep, I disagree with the above. I think, as does Suzuki, that the bike should be warmed up a bit before riding. Obviously you cant do this on the side stand. Using your foot will make a center stand lift easier. I think it will also get you more gas in the tank. Just takes some practice.

On an incline you will need to latch parking brake on side stand. Not necessary on centerstand.
I think the owners manual says you should only park on an incline if using the center stand. Not sure. ???
 

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Reaper, thanks.

BTW, what part of Michigan are you from?
You're welcome IMO the side stand is an accident waiting to happen , I live about 30 miles N.E. of Detroit near Lake St. Clair and Selfridge Air Force Base .


TheReaper!
 

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The Danish owners manual vaguely says that you should keep it running/alive until sufficiently warmed up.
I interpret that as long enough to secure it doesn't die when you let go of the throttle, which is less than 5 seconds after start, tested down to the freezing point.
The wonders of computerized fuel injection.
 

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The English manual says:
After the engine starts, let the engine run until the engine sufficiently warms up.
The oil pressure is present all over the engine in a second, and it idles effortlessly after 5 seconds.
 

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"After the engine starts, let the engine run until the engine sufficiently warms up."

We have a different view of warmed up if you are saying 5 seconds is enough. I don't agree.
 

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I use it. Daily. Because I like to warm the engine up to near operating temperature before taking off; and because the fuel injection gives it a fast idle...which is doubtless hard on the clutch if the rear wheel is held stationary.
Why? How is a scooter or motorcycle any different than a car. The recommended way to warm up an engine is to proceed at a moderate pace as soon as the engine will run adequately. Sitting and warming up at an idle increases contaminates in the oil and causes excess wear to the engine. I have driven cars, motorcycles and scooters as soon as they would run OK for the last 50+ years and I have never had a problem. Fuel injection just makes vehicles run better when cold. I get on my scooter and immediately ride. I do the same thing with my motorcycle with carbs but I keep the choke on until I pull out from my driveway (300+').
 

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Idling for 2-3 min, in cold weather usu not less than 5-6. You can feel bike doesn't pull strong when cold, i.e. additional load on the engine.

Center or side stand may depend on circumstances. One time parked V-Strom most securely on center stand and concrete ground, away from wind gusts, rain etc. to find out later its laying on the right side due to below ground water undercuts. Would have likely escaped that if parked on the side stand.
 

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I use it. Daily. Because I like to warm the engine up to near operating temperature before taking off; and because the fuel injection gives it a fast idle...which is doubtless hard on the clutch if the rear wheel is held stationary.
Why? How is a scooter or motorcycle any different than a car. The recommended way to warm up an engine is to proceed at a moderate pace as soon as the engine will run adequately. Sitting and warming up at an idle increases contaminates in the oil and causes excess wear to the engine. I have driven cars, motorcycles and scooters as soon as they would run OK for the last 50+ years and I have never had a problem. Fuel injection just makes vehicles run better when cold. I get on my scooter and immediately ride. I do the same thing with my motorcycle with carbs but I keep the choke on until I pull out from my driveway (300+').
Watch the tach. You don't start to move until you hit 2500-3000 rpm. That's TOO FAST on a cold engine.

An engine warms up faster under load. And faster drastic temperature changes are HARDER on an engine. Slow and steady...the longest-lived internal-combustion engines are the ones which are almost never allowed to cool off; that stay at operating temperatures almost permanently.

Police and taxi units; back when 100,000 miles was remarkable, those things routinely got five times that.

So...I'm gonna let it get up to temperature before I start winding it up.
 

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3) Unless the rear shocks are badly sagging or shortened, the B650 leans nicely over and has a much wider stance on two wheels and the side stand than on just the front wheel and the relatively narrow center stands feet.
With the parking brake engaged (a shame that it can't be locked), it also can't be pushed forward off the stand.
How much effort is it to pull it up off the side stand?

And...how much effort to rock it sideways off the CENTER stand?

Yes, it can go forward off the center stand. But that takes more of a push, and some knowledge of where to get leverage and what direction to push, than just picking it up off the side stand like a bicycle.
 
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