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I'm prejudiced, I do everything myself (vehicles and otherwise). So of course I would recommend doing it yourself if you have some competence with things mechanical. Look through the material (and especially the videos) on LeDude's excellent web site to get a feeling for what's involved.
 

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My experience with shops is mixed. I know when I break something during my maintenance I will repair it. I know I will pay attention to torque values on nuts and bolts. Both of those are sometimes not done by professionals. They are under pressure to control costs and get things done quickly.

I always think it is wise to understand the mechanicals of a machine well enough to do most maintenance yourself. We have wonderful resources here and LeDude's site/Youtube guidance as well.
 

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The answer my friend is blowing in the wind.

If you live in an area subject to bad weather and you have a garage or outbuilding then it is a very productive use of a weekend.

If however you are forced to work outside then you need to have reasonably good weather to tackle it.

ALSO

If you are methodical, willing to invest in simple tools, can follow instructions then YES do it yourself.
 

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I do all my own maintenance. That way I know it's done right. Normal PM work on the 650 is pretty simple to do so if you have even a minimum of mechanical experience then you should be able to handle it.
 

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The 650 is an extremely easy ride to maintain with a minimum tool set and you are
certain that the job was done correctly.

If you are not a DIYer, then build a good relationship with a shop that you trust.

You can check my burgman center to get an idea as to what it takes to the work youytself.

Good luck...
 

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OP as others have written, if you have some experience or a fairly logical analytical mind or are mechanically inclined, then simple preventative maintenance/servicing is fairly straight forward. Changing out the air filter is pretty simple, although the OEM filter itself is overpriced IMO. Replacing the engine, CVT/transmission and final drives fluids/oils is also pretty simple affair, once you either refer to a manual or Le Dudes repair centre etc. Don't forget to check the CVT stopped bolt on the RHS of the lower engine. Means having to crawl down low to access the lower/underside of engine/transmission, but is a very simple task.
The OEM oil filter requires a special tool, but if you buy a K&N then the filter has an nut welded onto the end of the 'can' which makes working with the filter far easier.
In relation to fluid changes, it's a case of loosening and tightening the correct bolts etc. Don't forget to check the radiator, best done from the front down by the front wheel area reaching in under the headlights, it's a bit of a tight space to access the radiator lid, but you need to know where and how. You'll work it out. For things like engine oil, coolant for the radiator reservoir etc., you'll need to remove the engine cover which is the hump between the seat and the front fairing (you might already know this). This space is often referred to as the 'tunnel' so it's be default the tunnel cover, though really is the engine inspection cover, that has one PK screw near the front of the seat. Look down you'll see it. Again referring to Le Dudes videos will be invaluable. Removing the tunnel/engine cover gives you access to the engine oil, transmission filler (though this can be access without removing any plastics (aka tupperware), as well as the radiator overflow and reservoir. One can find the cable for the - s e a t - - - r e l e a s e, here too, if the aforementioned won't open, which has happened to me on occasion. Some have fitted a more accessible emergency release elsewhere on their scoots... dig and yee shall find. I haven't mentioned the spark plugs because these are not accessible through the tunnel cover... refer to Le Dudes video's etc., but prepare yourself.

Now this all applies to the 2003-2012 manufactured scoots, cause 2013 onwards, some of this changed a little...

So as a refresher, the engine hump is referred to colloquially as a 'tunnel' and the fairing and all the various plastics are oft referred to as 'tupperware'

Basic set of spanners, crescents, flat and PK screw driver, Allen keys and metric socket set will handle majority of the preventative tasks.
 

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I work on all mine myself, because of cost, quaility of workmanship, and just like to. I think they are very easy to work on though I am a former auto mechanic which makes them easy compared to cars/trucks.

The biggest thing is taking care and not breaking tabs and things on the plastic body parts. Some things like clips may just need to be replaced over time though. Most mechanics are to focused on getting the job in/out (flat rating) rather than taking the time to be careful and do it correctly sadly.
 
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