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You can do the oil & filter changes yourself every 3000 miles..
2 quarts of oil & a filter ( about $8 ) just keep a record of it.
Multiplies of 3 is easy to remember..3..6..9..12..15..so forth.
 

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Cheeky, you can go either route of course, it's up to you. The question you may want to ask is...do you have a good dealer in your area? The 400 is not expensive to service even at the dealer. So that's a good option for many. However, as others say...servicing yourself is also very very easy and somewhat satifying. There is no need to change the oil before 3500 miles unless you do very short trips and the oil doesn't often get warmed up properly. Short trips kills the oil early. But it does no good to change it very frequently either (but no harm either) other than to make you feel good that the oil is changed and nice and clean. But as long as the oil you use is good quality, dirty oil lubes just as well and does not accelerate engine wear in the slightest as long as it's used within the mileage period for which it is intended. Filters are easy to change and virtually everything can be carried out by an owner with just a few normal good quality tools. Micbergsma has kindly made many very good videos with links on this site on how to do just about anything to your bike. Just search the 'how to' section. Have fun whatever you do. And keep posting!
 

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I've had every bike serviced at the dealer for the 600 mile service then took care of all the other service intervals there after.


alloo said:
Manual states every 3500 mile
The service manual also states that all maintenance intervals are dependent on what type of riding conditions the bike is put through, the harsher the riding conditions the more frequent the service interval should occur.
 

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I helped a friend who had his 2007 400 serviced exclusively at the dealer for the first 30,000 miles. I doubt he'll ever go back.

I think I read somewhere that mechanics are paid by the job and by commission. In other words, if they can get your bike serviced in half the time, they get paid more. If they can get you to buy parts you don't really need, they get paid more. There's no incentive for them to do more than get you in and back out as fast (and expensively) as possible.

We changed Doug's clutch, CVT belt and roller weights, plus changed the oil. Every bolt was so overtightened that I thought for sure we'd break one. The CVT cooling filter was so caked with grime, no air could get through it. The inside of the CVT had so much grime, it didn't seem like it has ever been cleaned. The final drive fluid didn't look like it had ever been changed either. And the clutch...it had been worn down far past just metal to metal contact. It had been so worn, the clutch pads and clutch bell were totally deformed.

You could be a complete novice who has never picked up a wrench before, and with the tutorials here and Mitch's (micbergsma) videos, do a lot better than those "trained" mechanics. You'll care about what you do. You have no guarantee that they will.

Chris
 

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Oil changes: Easy
Final drive oil change: easy once you get through the learning curve of removing the CVT inner case. By the way, you don't have to remove tupperware to get at the CVT case. I tried it.
Air filter cleaning or replacing: easy once you get through it once
Belt change: moderate, but easy after the first time.
Brake fluid change: most people ignore this but it's not difficult to DIY. Also cheap.
Valve adjustment: I haven't tackled this yet. It looks tricky, with the tensioner to deal with, also camshaft removal.
CVT air filter cleaning: Easy
Spark plug R&R: not too bad
Removal of rear tire: Moderate
Removal of front tire: Easy, just don't lift the bike so the tire is off the ground. That way, you don't have to lift it to replace it.

A torque wrench is almost a necessity with this bike. Get one that will cover up to 100 lb.-ft.

Good luck. Stay away from dealers. The maintenance chores look intimidating but are not. Keep your hard-earned $$$$$ :)
 

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Oh, you should get used to R&R the belt (CVT) case more often than is called for. Rubber dust gets all over everything. It makes the rollers (or sliders, in my case :) ) stick and rattle.
You will be surprised how much dust gets INTO the variator. I still can't figure out that one.....
 

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mike1nw said:
...Valve adjustment: I haven't tackled this yet. It looks tricky, with the tensioner to deal with, also camshaft removal.
...Good luck. Stay away from dealers. The maintenance chores look intimidating but are not. Keep your hard-earned $$$$$ :)
The valve adjustment wasn't hard at all. I did it, and I'm not a mechanic. (Try to get the right plugs on the right sensors though...) Mitch has an excellent video on even this.

Chris
 

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Daboo makes the point about dealers better than me. It does need to be a good quality dealer that you take you Burgman to for service if you go that route. In the UK we seem to be blessed with a very high overall service standard amongst our dealers. I think Suzi GB keeps a tight reign on them. On the point about valves...don't forget that actually just checking the valve clearances is very easy. Mostly they will be ok and not need adjustment, but even if they do need it, as long as you prepare with some light bedtime reading on 'how to' then you won't have any problems if you are careful. Warning: don't take the engine to bed with you to tinker with it as your wife won't like it and may throw you out! :lol:
 

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I will check out madman Mitch's video on valve adjust... but do you have to keep tension on the chain, to keep the tensioner in place? I know that somehow, removal of sprockets is involved here...
I am sort of a stickler for valve gaps being equal, so will probably end up re-shimming them if they aren't spot on. :|
 

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You remove the cam chain tensioner as one of the steps. Just mark the cam chain and the sprocket so you can easily match them back up. And you only have to remove that if you need to change a shim.

Here's the tutorial I wrote up with pictures. viewtopic.php?f=26&t=46038

My only mistake was in not labeling the sensors and plugs as Mitch shows in his video. I put a gray plug on a black sensor, and a black plug on a gray sensor. The bike didn't run well at all after that. Note...I was very consistent. I swapped them the first time, and then was very consistent to putting them back wrong each time I took it apart again. :roll: They were also the only two sensors that could possibly be swapped. All the others had the wrong wire length so they couldn't go anywhere else, and all had the wrong shaped plugs to fit anywhere else. But those two...yes, I managed to swap them.

The biggest pain in the rear to doing the job was getting the tupperware off.

Chris
 

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Two cents-----dealers often do not do/skip certain things as they aren't really necessary...but charge.

Burgman needs lots of fresh oil, I change oil every 2,000 miles or 60 days which ever comes first, miles usually come firstand filters every other oil change. WalMart 10-40 or Rotella mineral 15-40.
I did not open drive/belt case until 20,000 miles---no dust. But lots of stuff worn out----Suzuki paid, I already had new OEM belt on hand. Such things as oil on stand pivots, lever joints is something that always needs to be done.

Valve check/adjust. Unless funny noise or performance drop (tight valve) I forget it----just too big a pain on Burgman 400---My Suzuki GS500E, checked clearance at 1200, traded it at 64,000 miles---everything fine. My Citroen BX Diesel went 400,000 km--no check, shims, at dealer recommendation.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Idle curiousity, I benchmarked the labour and parts cost at a dealer.

So I have my first service done, but since then, up to around 6-7000 miles in a few months. Working out to around 270 miles or so a week.

SFMoto in San Fran quoted.. wait for it.. around 450$ excluding tax.. which comprises bleeding front and rear brakes, replacing spark plug, air filter, oil and oil filter.

I resisted the temptation to laugh at them, as they didnt even mention changing the final drive oil, or any other checks etc.

Apart from the fact that my Range Rover costs about the same to service (and they are not bloody cheap, or simple to work on).

Total, unacceptably pathetic attempt at a rip off.
 

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The part that I will never accept, and so do everything myself, is paying market rate for unskilled work.
Such as, removing tupperware.
Really, there is little that merits paying dealers' skilled labor rates.
Technical stuff? OK, I can see that.
But most fixit stuff is simple on this bike.
 

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mike1nw said:
...
Technical stuff? OK, I can see that.
But most fixit stuff is simple on this bike.
+1

I got started doing my own work because of two reasons. One, was the cost. It pained my penny-pinching hide to pay that much for the stealership to do the work. Two, was that they usually wanted the bike dropped off for a couple days while they worked it into their schedule. As a daily commuter, that was a hardship I wasn't willing to live with.

I don't consider myself a mechanic, but I can do simple things like change an oil filter on the car. So I decided to dive into that on the bike and found it wasn't much different. Just located in a different place. The hardest thing I found, was getting over the fear I'd screw things up and to pick up the wrench to get started. After that, it was easy.

I've ended up doing everything on the bike, with the exception of changing my own tires and bleeding the brakes and anti-freeze. None of that really bothers me. Even the valve check wasn't hard. You just had to pay attention to what you're doing.

When you do your own work, you know it was done right...and you have the freedom and flexibility to do it according to your schedule...not theirs.

Chris
 

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45000+ miles with engine oil & filter every 5k, rear axle oil every 10k & pull the CVT cover every 10k also. Air filter checked & replaced as needed every 5k. :thumbup: Still running the OEM brake pads. :cheers:
 

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it's your life and your skin on 2 wheels in a shippot of 2 to 80,000 pound cages out there at speeds guaranteed to ruin yhour weekend, do yhou trust your dealer that much?
also the money you saved can be put to Good use ,like spending it on wimmin and beer and wimmin, and wimmin , :blackeye: and maybe a shiny tool or farkle or wimmin
 
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