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I think the Shootout is pretty much the same as all the previous ones, that is, you will pick the one that you like most likely because your either a Honda, Suzuki, or BMW person. Since I have owned all three of the manufactures motorcycles over the years and have had very good luck with all of them, I would be picking my ride on style and looks. As I don't let money influence my choice of scooters that I would buy, I still have to say that the 650 Burgman is my scooter of choice on what is available in today market. I'm also wondering since Honda's Silverwing which has still not been announced for sale in the U.S. in 2014 will fall by the wayside and their Integra is their intended replacement. Is the Integra the Maxi Scooter of the future, I guess time will tell.

John
 

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I had a Burgman 650 and now a yamaha Tmax. The differences between maxi scoots is small. Standard windshields are too small for long rides. Scheduled maintenance is too high on all of them. They should be twist and go and not multiple, expensive, scheduled service intervals. CVT maintenance is a potential problem with all of them. Hard to do repairs on your own. I would be strongly looking at the Honda Integra with the dual clutch if it was available in the US.
 

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CVT maintenance is a potential problem with all of them. Hard to do repairs on your own. I would be strongly looking at the Honda Integra with the dual clutch if it was available in the US.
I would be more concerned with the potential problems and repair costs of a dual clutch than I would a CVT. The CVT is an older, simpler and more proven system than the dual clutch. The issues with dual clutch transmissions in cars would concern me.
 

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As post many time before, the 650 Burgman is ULTIMATE bike in Maxi-Scooter, it be difficult to beat king of Maxi-scooter. It just great all around useful and fun bike with much to offer to all. Easy purchase, easy for do regular maintenance, good for city and highway and so pleasurable all day long.

As for DCT will wait 5-6 more year and see.
 
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I would think just by the design of Honda's new DCT transmissions in there new motorcycles and the Integra scooter that cost of repairs would be much less then the CVT transmissions. Since these new DCT transmission are serviced from removing the outside engine case just like the manual transmission of bikes today, I would think that labor cost would be much less. Why not look at this video from Honda on the new DCT and see how easily it works.
I personally think that this type of auto transmission could be the future for motorcycles, scooters, ATV's, UTV's, etc.


John
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I would be more concerned with the potential problems and repair costs of a dual clutch than I would a CVT. The CVT is an older, simpler and more proven system than the dual clutch. The issues with dual clutch transmissions in cars would concern me.
Our 2012 Ford Focus SE Sport has 9,000 miles on the odometer and I'm super anal about maintaining my cars, motorcycles, and scooters. The DCT in the
Focus has been nothing but trouble so far. Its been in the shop a total of two and a half weeks because of trans problems. At 7,000 miles, my dealership installed a brand new transmission with "improved" clutches. It works much better than the old trans did, but only time will tell if Ford finally fixed the problems that plague their DCTs.
My wife and I usually buy imports, but our last three new cars have been Fords and other than the DCT problem in the Focus, we've had zero problems. However, the DCT problems have left a BAD taste in many Ford owners mouths.
 

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So far my experience with Honda's DCT is awful. I'll take an ECVT any day. And there are dozens upon dozens of vehicles with ECVT on the market in including Lexus and Mercedes amongst many other marques.

CVT always was the better solution....just took some time to get there. Good performance from a small motor.
Just punch your Power button on the 650 to know why.
 

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First, I wouldn't compare a Ford Focus to a Honda motorcycle, nothing to compare for obvious reasons. Second, your just SWAGing on the Honda DCT, it's too new to form a true opinion of it. Third, most scooter riders are not going for the DCT because Honda only has it in a motorcycle which a true scooter rider would not want a motorcycle. And last, the Honda DCT is hooked to a chain drive which some scooter riders would not have such a thing on their scooter. What would happen if Honda came out with a new 750 Silverwing, with a DCT trans, ABS, and a drive shaft to the rear wheel, I guess no one would buy them, ya right.

John
 

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They actually tried that back in the late 70s and early 80s, but they only lasted seven years. Of course in the 80s they didn't have ABS and she was a manual-shifter, and most people would consider her a motorcycle rather than a scooter, but in those days the liter-bikes were new and a 500-650 was thought of as a pretty substantial machine.

I didn't own one, but they were (and remain) pretty cool machines with a transverse-mounted V-twin (like a Motoguzzi) and a shaft drive behind a full fairing with bags. She was essentially a mini Gold Wing. They must have been darned reliable too, considering that there are plenty of them still on the road even though they haven't been manufactured in 30 years. They spliced the Silver Wing into the Silverwing when they brought back the name for their new Maxi-Scooter.

http://classic-motorbikes.net/gallery~honda-gl500-silver-wing

http://motoprofi.com/motospecspictures/honda/gl_500_silver_wing-1982.html
 

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In the last photo of the article, why are the two guys reading a big 'ol paper map? Who does that now-a-days? No smartphone, no Satnav? I'm surprised the third guy didn't have a sextant.

Obviously a prop they've been carrying around since the 70s.
 

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They actually tried that back in the late 70s and early 80s, but they only lasted seven years.
The CX500 clad in a full, Windjammer-like, fairing.

I owned a regular CX500, fitted with a crude, homemade full sports fairing.

The CX500 was very low geared, with a notchy 5-speed gearbox, and I would often start in 2nd gear to avoid the long pull up from 1st over neutral to 2nd.
When 4th wasn't enough to pass quickly, 3rd would often result in floating valves on the pushrod engine, as the revs went above 10000.

I often think back to the CX500, when I cruise along at half the revs for the same speed, or make a quick pass with the revs near redline, while the CVT gears up as the speed rises.
 

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It is interesting to note that BMW has chain drive and no dual overheadcam like Suzuki and Honda. And yet BMW name has more prestige. Go figure! (My other bike is BMW :) )
 

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The CX500 clad in a full, Windjammer-like, fairing.

I owned a regular CX500, fitted with a crude, homemade full sports fairing.

The CX500 was very low geared, with a notchy 5-speed gearbox, and I would often start in 2nd gear to avoid the long pull up from 1st over neutral to 2nd.
When 4th wasn't enough to pass quickly, 3rd would often result in floating valves on the pushrod engine, as the revs went above 10000.

I often think back to the CX500, when I cruise along at half the revs for the same speed, or make a quick pass with the revs near redline, while the CVT gears up as the speed rises.
My friend had one back when they were fairly new. I thought I wanted one (mini GUZZI) until I rode his. It was an uncomfortable vibrating thing that didn't compare well to my vertical twin Honda. However, he rode the thing 110,000 miles and sold it still running well.
 

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The vibration level and comfort of the CX500 was much better than the Guzzi 850T3 California money pit that I bought after it.
I remember the CX500 as more comfortable than my BMW R100RS.
 

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The vibration level and comfort of the CX500 was much better than the Guzzi 850T3 California money pit that I bought after it.
I remember the CX500 as more comfortable than my BMW R100RS.
Yep, great bike the old CX5, very smooth and very reliable except for 2 key weaknesses which affected nearly every bike - the stator and the plastic fan blades (which separated from the alloy boss). I bought a CX with vetter fairing, topbox and panniers in LA in '84 and rode it down to Argentina - ended up tearing the engine down in my hotel room in Rio and having a local auto electrician rewind the stator for me. Honda finally fixed the fan with the CX650 upgrade - they made it electric.
 

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..Honda finally fixed the fan with the CX650 upgrade - they made it electric.
I just removed it altogether, and rode with the radiator covered 2/3rds, since the whole cooling system was appearantly made for tropical climates.
Yes, I did switch the thermostat, too.
The CX engine has a flat bottom, so I would set an electric heating plate up against it, connected to a timer, so the engine was already warm in the morning.
The only electrical problem I experienced was the main harness going up in smoke, thanks to the P.O. replacing the main fuse with a 12 gauge wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
First, I wouldn't compare a Ford Focus to a Honda motorcycle, nothing to compare for obvious reasons. Second, your just SWAGing on the Honda DCT, it's too new to form a true opinion of it. Third, most scooter riders are not going for the DCT because Honda only has it in a motorcycle which a true scooter rider would not want a motorcycle. And last, the Honda DCT is hooked to a chain drive which some scooter riders would not have such a thing on their scooter. What would happen if Honda came out with a new 750 Silverwing, with a DCT trans, ABS, and a drive shaft to the rear wheel, I guess no one would buy them, ya right.

John
While I've had trouble with my Ford's DCT, other manufactures, VW for example, have had quite good results with their DCTs.

"If Honda came out with a new 750 Silverwing, with a DCT trans, ABS, and a drive shaft to the rear wheel, I guess no one would buy them, ya right."

I'd be first in line to buy one.
 
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