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Discussion Starter #1
Was on a nice weekend ride last week when I came across a newly blacktop paved road that seemed very smooth. As a relatively new rider (2 years) I started to wonder if this type of road surface might be a little less safe than a normal concrete road. I have ridden in gravel parking lots which I know can be challenging and more dangerous and also had an experience with my front tire losing its grip when turning on one of those tar (?) strips they use to patch small cracks/seems. I have also read that the painted arrows on the roads can be dangerous, especially if wet.

Would be interested in hearing the thoughts of others on this topic.
 

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Are you talking paved with asphalt? If so they are fine.

Even dry some of the painted lines can be slippery and when it rains they are even more so.

Tar! Gravel! These are things of nightmares for 2 wheels!

The favorite method of road repair here is to squirt tar on the road and then dump crushed gravel on top of that. Worse in that they don't put up any warning signs. I pulled out of the parking lot where I work one night and woop! down I went. After I got up and made sure I wasn't hurt and that my scoot wasn't hurt{it was a Yamaha Zuma 50cc}. I started looking around to find out what happened. Sure enough they had done spot repairs of tar and gravel{with twice as much gravel than needed}. Since it was dark you couldn't see the repairs. Luckily my helmet saved me from anything serious, I just had a whooper of a headache and a bit of whiplash.
 

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Smooth new asphalt is a good surface to ride on. I love it when I find that.

Unfortunately it doesn't take TXDot long to come around and cover it with chip seal. They claim it makes the road last longer but to me it just messes up a perfectly good road.
 

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Around here, the worst is milled pavement. (Almost all roads are asphalt in this area.) That's when they grind the top inch and a half off to prep things for resurfacing. The resulting pavement is not smooth (it has grinding marks), but that's not the issue. The issue is the fact that the inevitable result is asphalt "pebbles" everywhere!
 

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Got to watch those tar strips in the 90-120F days!!

DRY Paint can get you also, if you are banking way hard like a racer, probably no worries on the scoot...

Always keep a bike up straight on wet days when cornering on wet paint, rail lines etc etc...Standing a bike up in a curve is a good practice move...Shift your weight on the saddle and push bike in opposite direction, ala...Hang off left side of saddle and push bike up straight in a left hand curve.
 

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Got to watch those tar strips in the 90-120F days!!

DRY Paint can get you also, if you are banking way hard like a racer, probably no worries on the scoot...

Always keep a bike up straight on wet days when cornering on wet paint, rail lines etc etc...Standing a bike up in a curve is a good practice move...Shift your weight on the saddle and push bike in opposite direction, ala...Hang off left side of saddle and push bike up straight in a left hand curve.
I use that move often, there are thick painted lines for cross walks at most intersections and I like to lean this scoot over, often doing a sudden get her vertical for a second as I traverse the paint then back down :)
I have always done that tho, started on my GSXR back in the day.

One thing I really like tho is the ability to thread the needle when it comes to the tar sealing lines, this scoot is so easy to decide where its line will be with the smallest input, I love the handling :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sounds like good advice on trying to keep the bike up straight on the wet paint. Unfortunately it seems like cities around here are using more and more of those tar strips to do quick inexpensive fixes. The cold weather, snow, and salt can take a toll on the roads here. Hopefully when I retire I can move to a warmer place.
 

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I think the tar is to seal cracks, so they can AVOID the more expensive fixes.
 

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Don't count on "warm places" having better roads. The 100 miles of US-101 from Ukiah to San Rafael CA that I rode in March was one of the best examples of third-world pavement I've ever seen. I thought something was going to break on my 650. Granted, I didn't see too many motorcycle-swallowing chuckholes such as the ones I remember in Ohio after the brutal winter of '76-'77. But obviously CA has other more important ways to spend what it steals from its taxpayers than to maintain its infrastructure.
 

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Don't count on "warm places" having better roads. The 100 miles of US-101 from Ukiah to San Rafael CA that I rode in March was one of the best examples of third-world pavement I've ever seen. I thought something was going to break on my 650. Granted, I didn't see too many motorcycle-swallowing chuckholes such as the ones I remember in Ohio after the brutal winter of '76-'77. But obviously CA has other more important ways to spend what it steals from its taxpayers than to maintain its infrastructure.
Interesting. Last month I rode from north of Eureka down to Legget, before heading to Hwy 1, and thought the quality of US-101 was above average. (Then again, I ride LA freeways).
 

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Over the seasons in North America, (extreme cold and extreme heat) the tar filler is used to fill the 'expansion cracks' it is not used as a budget surface repair.
 

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When I lived on the coast in North Carolina, I would have been willing to take a beating rather than ride over the steel mesh bridges. Those things scared the crap out of me.

Doug from Kentucky
 
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