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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I took this picture a few months ago in France. As you can see it is a memorial to the fallen French in both world wars. If you blow up the picture you will see that the rifle has a hook at the end and I am very curious as to why it is there. Was it to hook things/people (injured men?) out of trenches etc? Does anyone out there know?
 

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sometimes when people been shootin at ya, you need a place fer yer panties to hang out to dry, don't worry they won't be white.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
mikeyMarine said:
sometimes when people been shootin at ya, you need a place fer yer panties to hang out to dry, don't worry they won't be white.
I won't worry about them not being white 'cos we British Lads don't wear panties - our girls do! :cheers:
 

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The hook on the gun on the memorial looks different than the hook on the M1.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
model28a said:
The hook on the gun on the memorial looks different than the hook on the M1.
I agree. I don't think it was used for stacking and I don't think it had anything to do with the fitting of the bayonet. I am at a complete loss about it and can offer no suggestions other than as an aid to grabbing/lifting things. I don't suppose there are any knowledgeable Frenchman on line to elucidate.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
rustynail said:
I think the bayonet is broken off the statue.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/pre-WWI-Era-Fre ... 1158810247

Most the French bayonets of that era had hooks.

But the question remains: what for?
Yes, I think you have hit upon it - but as you say, the question remains. Could it have been a forward finger-hold for steadying the rifle during bayoneting? Dreadful thought!
 

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Staking hooks or rods came in a lot of different designs and some were just hooks like the one on that rifle. Here is a picture of another design.



Others were rods like on this rifle



Older rifles used hooks or rods but rings/swivels like on the M1 in the earlier picture became more common as the years went by.
 

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I wouldn't have a clue about them either if we hadn't used them in basic. That's the only times I have ever seen them used.
 

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Okay... It's not a stacking hook as others suggested.

It is a blade-breaker quillon, common on French bayonets around that period. As you can see in this old postcard - the statue DID indeed have a bayonet at one time.

[attachment=0:ttov45c8]372215772.694244.jpg[/attachment:ttov45c8]

http://www.e-monumen.net/index.php?opti ... &Itemid=19

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chassepot


-edit:
I guess it could be used to stack weapons. After looking further - some say it was designed to "catch" another bayonet in close combat and some say it was used for stacking weapons.

I submit that the original purpose was bayonet defense - as it is a part of the bayonet and not the rifle in early designs. Can't stack rifles unless you have a bayonet...

Perhaps it was used to stack weapons as a secondary purpose, and was added to other rifles separate from the bayonet in future designs?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
rustynail said:
Okay... It's not a stacking hook as others suggested. It is a blade-breaker quillon, common on French bayonets around that period. As you can see in this old postcard - the statue DID indeed have a bayonet at one time.
Well, I guess the postcard solves my query. QED. Thanks for all your replies. (especially for the postcard - did you have it stashed away in your attic or did you google for it? Whatever, I thank you. )
 

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after closer examination of the statue,which is apparently supposed to be an action shot of 2 men (enfants) I surmise 2 things , France sucks at baseball, and that hook might have something to do with getting better range out of that grenadier, cause he aint throwing that thing past his shoe tips without some kind of help with that stance , if he was playing fetch his dog would be laffin
 

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peelbrow said:
rustynail said:
Okay... It's not a stacking hook as others suggested. It is a blade-breaker quillon, common on French bayonets around that period. As you can see in this old postcard - the statue DID indeed have a bayonet at one time.
Well, I guess the postcard solves my query. QED. Thanks for all your replies. (especially for the postcard - did you have it stashed away in your attic or did you google for it? Whatever, I thank you. )
I googled it. I just searched the text on the statue base - and it came up with some sites.
 
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