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I'm a new scooter rider who hasn't ridden anything on 2 wheels with a motor in over 27 years. I need advice on how to best ride my '400.

When riding aggressively around town do you prefer to keep your feet flat on the floor boards? Does that help with handling? When cruising leisurely do you prefer to put your feet up (cruiser style)?

When it comes to going around corners quickly I'm not very good right now.
I have trouble going around a corner over 45 mph on the '400. I think I will need to change the suspension setting back to 3 from 2 as that helps some.

Any other advice for riding the '400 like an expert?

Thanks.
 

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I keep my feet up cruiser style. It's very uncomfortable flat on the floor and with your feet up higher you can really press with your feet for extra stability if you need it.
 

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First off ride with your feet where it feels the best to you. Don't worry about how others ride. Second off is the more you ride the better you get at your skills and what the 400 can & can't do. Me I ride with my feet at a 45 angle. That is heal on the floorboard & ball of the foot on the angle. Have done that on my 400 & 650. ;)
 

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Re: foot position. Experiment. Move your feet around. I find that I mostly like to have my feet flat on the floorboards and not tilted up "cruiser style"... but experiment and you will find where your comfortable. There's no right or wrong.

Re: cornering speed. Walk before you run and don't let anyone (yourself included) talk you into riding past your own comfort level. With practice comes confidence... and with confidence comes comfort... your riding will likely improve as you get more and more experience under your belt.

Read some articles online about "safe riding". Maybe take a MSL course if available in your area.

And have fun riding.
 

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You ride the way that is most comfortable for you. With my 400, I started out with my feet flat on the floor board and later found that I was more comfortable with my feet forward. On my 650, I started out with my feet forward and found that my feet on the floor was better.

As you ride, you will find that turning gets easier and you will gradually go faster through the turns.
 

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Riding is a skill, just like any other. Skills need to be learned, internalized, practiced and reaffirmed for you to stay in top riding form. And after a 27 year hiatus, you can be assured your skills are rusty. This forum and perhaps reading some riding books and taking the MSF course is a start to the learning part. Riding every chance you get will help you learn and solidify those skills.

So far as foot position, I've little to add that hasn't been written already, other than I very much prefer the cruiser style. It allows me the ability to push back against the backrest and use my hips to help steer the bike in the tight twisties, "butt steering" I call it. Ya kinda swivel your hips to help the bike lean. But that's me. You will find your own style.

I always say it takes six months to a year and several thousand miles before one truly masters how to ride a particular bike. But boy is it fun to practice! Have fun. :)
 

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Riding advice

I'm a new scooter rider who hasn't ridden anything on 2 wheels with a motor in over 27 years. I need advice on how to best ride my '400.

When riding aggressively around town do you prefer to keep your feet flat on the floor boards? Does that help with handling? When cruising leisurely do you prefer to put your feet up (cruiser style)?

When it comes to going around corners quickly I'm not very good right now.
I have trouble going around a corner over 45 mph on the '400. I think I will need to change the suspension setting back to 3 from 2 as that helps some.

Any other advice for riding the '400 like an expert?

Thanks.

To the already good advice already posted, I would add that you should make a conscious effort to employ counter steering to change direction at speed.....especially important, as you have no tank between your knees....provides directional changes more quickly and that are more responsive than simply leaning on a scooter or other two-wheeled conveyance. Try it and you will notice an immediate difference. Also take the MSF course. They teach it there, as well.

TW
 

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Discussion Starter #9
To the already good advice already posted, I would add that you should make a conscious effort to employ counter steering to change direction at speed.....especially important, as you have no tank between your knees....provides directional changes more quickly and that are more responsive than simply leaning on a scooter or other two-wheeled conveyance. Try it and you will notice an immediate difference. Also take the MSF course. They teach it there, as well.

TW
Thank You. I think feet on the floorboards also helps with the countersteer.
 

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First off ride with your feet where it feels the best to you. Don't worry about how others ride. Second off is the more you ride the better you get at your skills and what the 400 can & can't do. Me I ride with my feet at a 45 angle. That is heal on the floorboard & ball of the foot on the angle. Have done that on my 400 & 650. ;)
I tried it with my feet flat and forward, ended up just like this. Lets me push back against my backrest if needed, and lean forward to help with big bumps.
I spent 3600 miles on a Zuma125 which really helped learning how to used a cvt in traffic and ride corners. The 400 is 200 lbs heavier, but much smoother ride and easier to keep speed up,around corners with the long wheel base.
 

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The other point to make is about the suspension setting at the rear. As standard, the bike comes from the factory with the suspension preload set to level 3. This is ok for some, but most people I know crank it up to 4 or 5. the top level (hardest setting) is 7. I have mine on 5 and the difference is amazing. I can throw the bike into corners with gusto when I ride solo, without it bouncing all over the road. It handles much more like a motorcycle. I'm not suggesting you do that yet. But cranking it up one position at a time may improve your confidence. The bigger the number the more responsive the bike is in the corners. But the ride firms up more too. People with back problems usually leave it on a low setting as the ride is softer and doesn't jar the spine. So you need to find the best one for you. Your manual gives some information about setting the suspension. Altering the suspension setting to a higher number will alter the ride height slightly. This will make your headlights shine lower. You may need to bring them back up a bit. That's easy to do. Altering the suspension by one setting will not normally need headlight adjustment though.
 
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