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I have a nice route to go on a short ride after work to scratch my riding itch that takes about 45 minutes. Nice curvy roads, beautiful scenery, hills and flatlands. Well today I went out for my ride and about halfway through it I about got blown over by a gust of wind. From there on out I was fighting the wind all the way home and was really worried that I was going to get blown over along the way.

I had never really had any problems riding in the wind before but for some reason today really seemed bad. I don't know if its the size of my bike, a AN400 or the wind gusting a little bit but has anyone else really had any problems riding and getting blown around on the road?
 

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it's just normal, all bikes get blown away with strong wind gusts, FJRs, Kawas, Goldwinds, Concours and Burgmans.

It is just part of riding motorcycles, depending on the fairing you got, it can get better with the Givi AF266 but when the wind is strong there is no much to do other than slow down, keep riding and try to relax your grip.

see my last trip where i go through strong winds and sand:

 

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I don't mind steady wind up to 45 or 50 mph (I just slow down some) but bad wind gusts driving me across lanes and I pull off. No sense in getting killed when a gust pushes me into an oncoming car. Usually can ride okay off the interstate even when the wind is giving big gusts as buildings and land features break them up some in this part of the country (lots and lots of trees).
 

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Just Turn the Throttle and Keep Steady Rising Power!! This Tactic Seems to work As long as you keep Power in the Throttle, When you Throttle down is when the Wind seems to mostly affect you..

Elliott,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had to pull off twice. I did notice when I increased speed it wasn't so bad though. Wind I think I can handle but the gusts really had me going.
 

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Best advice I can give you is to relax your grip on the handlebars and keep your body posture loose. If you tense up and get a death grip on the handlebars then every time a gust hits your body and moves it sideways you transmit that movement to the handlebars. We all know what happens when you push the handlebars one way or the other. You turn in the direction opposite to the way you push the bars.
 

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Yes, Fernando is right, it is just part of MCing. It's a little better with a heavier bike, but then again its harder to correct also. I almost got blown into a semi once on a 700lbs St1100. No bike is immune.

I find the 400 vary stable at speed. Yes the gusts will blow you around, just keep the power up and its easy enough to correct. Make sure you have a lot of defensible space around you. Don't want to be pushed into any semis.
 

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Yes, Fernando is right, it is just part of MCing. It's a little better with a heavier bike, but then again its harder to correct also. I almost got blown into a semi once on a 700lbs St1100. No bike is immune.

I find the 400 vary stable at speed. Yes the gusts will blow you around, just keep the power up and its easy enough to correct. Make sure you have a lot of defensible space around you. Don't want to be pushed into any semis.
Thanks, its nice to know the big bikes get pushed around a bit also. As far as space I always try to ride back roads when I want to relax where my main concern is deer rather than cars. Had a friend who got blind sided by a deer on his motorcycle and it totaled the bike and almost killed him.
 

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Poor Deer Did not know what hit Him, I Guess he went some where Went to Sleep and Died!!

Wind Factors, and Fuel economy , Gas seem to go fast as well, As in Drag! Especially when your riding Against the Wind.

Ride Safe All..

Elliott,
 

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I also find it helpful sometimes to extend my knee out from the coverage of the fairing on the windward side. This introduction of turbulence can have the effect of limiting some of the effects of the wind. This seems to work best with a steady wind....with gusts you're pretty much at the mercy of your skills and comfort level.

late,
Coz
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well I'm riding every day so I can get used to different weather conditions and roads. Lots of fun and the wind gusts don't seem to bother me as much since I've 'loosened' up my grip.
 

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Stick your knee out on the windward side of the bike, it'll stabilize the bike by introducing a counterforce (due to the wind you create while driving) on the opposite side of the side the wind is pushing you.

You will notice the bike coming more upright and allow you to have more control over it. I use it all the time when driving the freeway/highway and it really works.

The other tips which were given still hold true also, keep your area around yourself large and defend it against "intruders". If you feel uncomfortable, slow down, relax, think and react.
 

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I got blown around a bit last Sunday...yeah, gusty wind is an adventure. Nudging the throttle did seem to help a bit.
 

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This has worked for me and others. Try riding with one hand. The two handed death grip exasperates the effects on the bike. Essentially it loosens you up and you float instead of jerk. It sounds crazy and a bit un-nerving but it works.
 

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Stick your knee out on the windward side of the bike, it'll stabilize the bike by introducing a counterforce (due to the wind you create while driving) on the opposite side of the side the wind is pushing you.

You will notice the bike coming more upright and allow you to have more control over it. I use it all the time when driving the freeway/highway and it really works.

The other tips which were given still hold true also, keep your area around yourself large and defend it against "intruders". If you feel uncomfortable, slow down, relax, think and react.
+1. It does work. We get 40-50mph crosswinds sometimes east of Crowsnest Pass. No problem, once you get used to it. Don't go too fast and beware that you will move several feet when you pass houses or a grove of trees.

Regards
Scott Fraser
Calgary
 

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A knee out into the windy side works for me. Think it was Buffalo who posted that a long time ago and I have been using that technique ever since. Nudging up the throttle for strong gusts is new to me and I will give it a go too. Thanks guys.
 

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I do think I've done the knee thing unconsciously....but one thing to be careful with is windshadow and vortex off big rigs.
Two hands riding in crosswinds ( no death grip tho ) and at least you are prepared for surprises.

Windshadow even from overpasses can be startling as the overpasses can funnel the wind in odd ways.
Just have fun with it tho.....ride to your comfort level....the bike won't let you down.
 

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Yup, knee out into the wind does work. For me, I find that if I keep a loose grip on the bars, the bike will lean into the wind on it's own. It's when I'm really tight on the bars that the bike moves around, and then I can make it worse by target-fixating on something along the side of the road. My suspicion is that for folks who report problems riding in the wind, this is often the actual cause. You should be able to do the chicken dance (flap your elbows) at all times when you're riding.

Put another way, have you ever seen the Youtube video of the racer who falls off his motorcycle, and the bike straightens up and rolls down the road until it slows enough to fall over (see it here)? The motorcycle is very capable of doing what it needs to do to stay upright, even in the wind. It's usually the nut between the seat and the handlebars that screws things up. That's not to say the riding in the wind isn't fatiguing; getting your head slapped around will wear you out quicker than riding on a calm day. So if you start zoning out after dealing with wind, it's definitely a good idea to park the bike.
 
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