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What gloves, if any, do you use to ride. I have been looking at Thor brand motocross gloves but not sure if they will be comfortable. Thanks!
 

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I use the insulated construction gloves in fall and early spring. They are nylon with textured rubber pads and are very flexible. Cost about $20. is summer I usually don't wear any. An aftermarket windshield cuts most of the wind and bugs off the hands.
 

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Ahh... Gloves... I always wear gloves when I ride.

Hot weather: I have a set of Olympia perforated leather gloves. These are real nice. The palms have padding to cushion your grip on the handgrips. The leather on the back side is perforated to let some air get to your hands, and to let perspiration out. There is a wide velcro strap on the back to adjust the wrist opening after you put them on. I've worn them for a few years, and they still look (and work) like new.

Moderate temperatures: I have a set of Olympia Deerskin gloves. They have no padding on the palms, but deerskin is a very soft, supple material. I've had these for quite a long time. The black color is starting to fade a little, but other than that they are still in good shape. These have an elastic wrist closure - non-adjustable - but it works.

Note: Olympia has been making motorcycle gloves for a long time, and I've always been satisfied with their products.

Moderate temperatures: I saw a set of Icon Deerskin gloves at a dealership this Spring. They are gorgeous! They do have padding on the palms, and they also have a velcro wrist closure adjustment. I went online and got a pair from Arizona Motorsports for $36.00 plus shipping, which was a little better deal. These are more hi-tech than my old Olympia deerskins. I got them in tan color instead of black - I think it will make my hands more visible when I wave. I haven't worn them much yet, but they promise to be a nice set of gloves.

Cold Weather: I have a set of Gerbing electrically heated gloves. They plug into the sleeves of my Gerbing heated jacket liner (which plugs into the scooter's 12v system). The jacket liner and gloves are controlled via a thermostat, which clips to the belt on my riding jacket. I rode one day last Winter when it was 19 degrees F outside. Gerbing heated riding gear is somewhat expensive, but it works really well, and should last for years. Prior to the Gerbing setup, I used Widder electric vest & gloves. Both companies have been making heated clothing for motorcycling for quite a few years.
 

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Cold weather I wear standard ski gloves. I already have those around anyway. Warm/hot weather it's either no gloves, or if I'm going the distance, bicycle (padded palms, mesh back) gloves. Like ten bucks at Wal-Mart. I'm cheap. :roll:
 

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wasions said:
Cold weather I wear standard ski gloves. I already have those around anyway. Warm/hot weather it's either no gloves, or if I'm going the distance, bicycle (padded palms, mesh back) gloves. Like ten bucks at Wal-Mart. I'm cheap. :roll:
Motorcycle gloves are different - they are cut to be optimally comfortable with your fingers closed around the handlebar grips. This is most critical with the heavier cold weather gloves. Yes, you could do the Walmart thing, but it won't be as good.

I figure with gloves, helmets, boots, jackets, etc. for riding, I'm going to use that stuff a lot. It's worth what I pay to get good, sturdy, comfortable gear that was designed specifically for motorcycling. Divide the cost by the number of hours I use it - it's pretty cheap.
 

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I'd like to add to Paul's comments on the construction of good motorcycle gloves. In addition to the cut of the fingers (that allow for a slight curvature of the fingers for gripping the bars) look for gloves that don't have the seams on the fingers on the inside. These seams will irritate your skin over a period of time and can cause blisters. :D
 

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Thanks!

Thank you to all of you that replied. I am going shopping this weekend to find the perfect pair for me. Who knew there were so many options? :shock:
 

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Re: Thanks!

casek said:
Thank you to all of you that replied. I am going shopping this weekend to find the perfect pair for me. Who knew there were so many options? :shock:
It's only money... You'll make more... (One of my dealer's favorite sayings.) But seriously, try on a few pair, and buy the ones you like best. Over time, you'll be happy you did!
 

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Actually, Paul, ski gloves are cut very similarly to m/c gloves. The fingers are already curved to grab the poles, reinforced palms, etc., etc. And there's a lot more choices available with ski gloves. :)
 

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wasions said:
Actually, Paul, ski gloves are cut very similarly to m/c gloves. The fingers are already curved to grab the poles, reinforced palms, etc., etc. And there's a lot more choices available with ski gloves. :)
I'll buy what you say for winter-weight gloves, but I doubt that they have anything for summer riding. And they couldn't compete for warmth with the electrically heated winter riding gloves I wear. Eliminating the electrically heated category, I'd guess they are probably equivalent in warmth to winter motorcycle gloves.

I always wear gloves when I ride - even on hot days. A good pair of summer-weight riding gloves can keep your hands more comfortable. More importantly, they'll save some skin if you fall.
 

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Paul wrote: They plug into the sleeves of my Gerbing heated jacket liner (which plugs into the scooter's 12v system).

This is probably a stupid newbie question, but do you have to keep the glove box door open when using the 12v?

For the record, I always wear gloves when riding: half-fingered padded leather if it's about 75, full-finger leather with perforations if below that.

Thanks,

Bryna
 

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Invincsum said:
Paul wrote: They plug into the sleeves of my Gerbing heated jacket liner (which plugs into the scooter's 12v system).

This is probably a stupid newbie question, but do you have to keep the glove box door open when using the 12v?

For the record, I always wear gloves when riding: half-fingered padded leather if it's about 75, full-finger leather with perforations if below that.

Thanks,

Bryna
Byrna,

The electric clothing doesn't plug in to the glovebox accessory plug. Gerbing uses a different (smaller) socket. Widder uses still a different type of connector. Either manufacturer provides a wiring harness for their gear. The harness is fused, and connects directly to the battery terminals under the seat. Then you just route the cord so that the power recepticle peaks out from under the seat. Mine comes out right about where my right leg falls when I put my feet down. Very easy to reach down & plug in or unplug the cord. My Gerbing cord that connects the jacket to the power harness has a small thermostat that clips to the belt on my riding jacket. I can easily adjust the heat up or down while riding.

Living in a area that has cold weather, you can extend your riding season a lot with this gear. I can ride in 30 degree weather or even colder, and my upper body, arms, neck and hands are all toasty warm. In really cold weather, I just add a pair of "long johns" for my legs, and some heavy socks. The only problem is that I can't ride real far if it's much colder than 25 degrees, because my face gets cold - even with a full face helmet.

My material for Scootercade mentions that you need light clothing during the day, but that it can get very cold in the valleys if you ride in the evening. I'm covered - I'll just stick my electric gear in the trunk!

The stuff is pricy, but it last for years. One long miserable teeth chattering ride - and you get kinda willing to pay the price... :wink:
 
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