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Hi does anyone or has anyone used Jerry Motorman Palladino techniques. Do they work on a Burgman 650 with no clutch for friction point etc to work with.?
 

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Short answer: Yes...it takes some getting used to though and a lot of REAR brake usage.

Long Answer: Yes, (see above) and you will find the clutch "Friction Zone" soon enough and learn how to manipulate it to your advantage simultaneously with the REAR brake. Everything else (technique) is the same as with a clutched motorcycle.

Start with mastering a full lock turn (left AND right) within 2 parking spaces. The MSF Box for the 650 is 20ft x 80ft or find an empty parking lot with and aisle and use 2 parking spots wide x the aisle width + parking spots. ALL motorcycles/Scooters can do a full lock turn (both ways) within that space.

Also work on balance with your feet on the floorboards while going over an elevated section starting with a couple of 2x8x10ft pieces of lumber (end to end) and then start raising them with blocks/bricks. As you get more (over) confident, either go higher or use smaller boards. Minumim board used is a 2x4x10ft.

Know that a good rider/motor officer can balance (at a stand still) 45-240 seconds with no (forward) movement. Typically, in a rodeo or gymkhana event, there is a stop box where you must stop with your feet up and maintain no (forward) movement for x-number of seconds or your fail that section.

Also, to keep things interesting, go find the Gymkhana stuff on the YouTubes and interwebz (motogym dot com) and work on the various patterns and such in an empty parking lot with some cones or pop/soda cans. Start slowly at first and work on technique (still no front brake) and then work on speed. Record yourself for a better perspective of your technique and learning.

The Burgman is great for this type of riding once you master the balance point and "friction zone".

Fwiw....
 

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Dear drphilld,

“Know that a good rider/motor officer can balance (at a stand still) 45-240 seconds with no (forward) movement. Typically, in a rodeo or gymkhana event, there is a stop box where you must stop with your feet up and maintain no (forward) movement for x-number of seconds or your fail that section.”

What’s the secret to this magic ? I’d really like to master this for stop signs .

P.S. That’s the first time I’ve seen an American use the word Gymkhana....I thought that was an East Indian Word for Sports Club......Now I see..
 

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Term Gymkhana is used in horse steeplechase/barrel racing and many car sporting events.

I have a "I love Gymkhana" sticker somewhere here. I Gymkhana raced a 84 Dodge Shelby in Washington, Oregon and BC Canada. Some call it autocross.
 

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Hey Dave_J how long can you balance at a stop sign .....I’m almost there.

P.S. your little picture is weak compared to the one with the Red Truck.....Speaking of Trucks....Is Blacktruck ok ?
 

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When on a motorcycle tire in the rear I could stop for 3-4 seconds in traffic. Never really practiced it. But I do have a friend that can stop at a light and not put a foot down on his FJR1300A.

But doing a 'Brakestand' on my 10 speed when younger I never unclipped my feet off the pedals, even when I had a rucksack on. Second gear, front brake held and forward pressure on pedal.
 

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It is possible with any bike with practice. I was sometimes able to balance at a stop on my Gold Wing... for a few seconds. On every bike since that one I sometimes am able to come to a complete stop at a stop light/sign and even though I put my foot out on the left side ready to set down the bike just sits there balanced only on 2 wheels for several seconds. At that point the light changes and I go again or the bike slowly leans over to the left (usually when I move my left foot even farther out). On my Burgman I can do this much more often and usually for longer. One key I found helps me is FRONT brake and rear pressure on the throttle just enough to keep the drive line tight. Front brake method is usually more difficult for most but I found it easier for me. Did it that way on my GW learning going about walking speed in traffic congestion (Iowa doesn't allow lane splitting or filtering by motorcycles). Never really counted how many seconds I could hold it balanced.
 

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I always put my foot down because if you don't some eager cop will write a ticket for Failure to Stop. Try proving to a non-rider Judge that you fully stopped but balanced the bike!
 

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I always put my foot down because if you don't some eager cop will write a ticket for Failure to Stop. Try proving to a non-rider Judge that you fully stopped but balanced the bike!
 

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many thanks will be trying this out when all this lockdown finishes(y)
With this technique you can ride in the living room, Just push the furniture to the center! (if swmbo asks, tell her you moved it all cause you are looking for something you dropped, hopefully she won't notice the motorcycle in the room).
 

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“... looking for something you dropped“ seems to pale in comparison to “Honey, first i was going to vacuum and then i was going mop the place with an aromatic disinfectant.”
 

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Todays Lesson: Balance Technique - the basics

To balance at a stoplight (less than 120 sec)
  • apply the REAR brake and be in the "friction zone" (slight revving i.e. starting to try to move forward)

  • apply the front brake LIGHTLY (to prevent side to side handlebar movement/wobble).

  • Your bike will (typically) want to lean slightly to the left, therefore you must counter balance (shift your self/butt i.e. half a cheek off the seat and to the right) the bike. Don't worry, its not leaning that much...record yourself and see.

  • Head and upper body should be upright, square, and RELAXED with your eyes and nose forward...remember, where your nose goes you bike goes!

  • Feet should be in the seated position (not forward) and the right foot may be used to press on the peg/floorboard to help with balance.
RELAX and be in the zone! Its all about confidence and technique.

For longer (greater than 120 sec) same as above but the handlebars go to full lock to the LEFT with both brakes applied and the engine in the friction zone (slight revving) and the bike leaned slightly to the left...and a will to stay balanced that long.

Practice, Practice, Practice...the more you ride and work on riding techniques, the better rider you will (sub-consciously) become.
 

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Practiced yesterday in my Virus quiet neighborhood and was able to come to a complete stop at Stop Sign and achieve two seconds before moving on at empty intersections. Thanks drphilld.
 

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Today's Lesson: The Creep - slow riding basics

***DISCLAIMER - the techniques described below are a general overview and should be practiced in a closed off parking lot or safe area free from traffic. The techniques are best learned in a Gross to Fine manner (i.e. work on the big stuff then master the little stuff as your practice) until the technique becomes 2nd nature. Keep your practice sessions short, Take a break during practice to mentally review or record yourself and review what to work on, and HAVE FUN!

Also, be wary that practicing these techniques becomes addictive and will ultimately make you a better rider with the side effects of your bike eating brake pads, your penchant for finding empty parking lots to ride in whilst out riding for enjoyment, and reinforce your neighbors opinion of your (in)sanity
***

For those in isolation or under stay at home orders (and have an itch to ride) here is the precursor to mastering the balance technique. You can work on this technique in a limited space area (i.e. your driveway) and can incorporate rolling FULL LOCK turns.

The Creep a.k.a. the slow ride

The objective: As you slow down, keep rolling (barely) enough to maintain momentum and not put your feet down. This can be used as a "rolling stop", useful in stop & go traffic, or at a stoplight when you are unsure if it is about to change color.

From a rolling motion (in a straight line)
  • apply the REAR brake and be in the "friction zone" with slight engine revving BUT still moving forward
    • your throttle hand will only use 3 fingers (thumb, ring and pinky) and look like a 60's peace hand gesture wrapped around the throttle.
  • apply the front brake LIGHTLY using 2 fingers (index and middle) to finess the side to side handlebar control.

  • Your bike will (typically) want to lean slightly to the left, therefore you must counter balance (shift your self/butt i.e. AROUND on the seat and to the right) the bike but refrain from sudden movements!

  • Head and upper body should be upright, square, and RELAXED with your eyes and nose forward...remember, where your nose goes you bike goes!

  • Feet can be in either position, though it is recommended to start in the seated position.
From a rolling motion (full lock turn)
  • slide FORWARD to the edge of your seat so your elbows are bent at 45degrees.

  • TURN YOUR HEAD in the direction of the turn with your eyes and nose forward and rotate your head thru the turn...remember, where your nose goes you bike goes! (your shoulders should be turned naturally too)

  • NO pressure on the FRONT brake...best practice is to take your fingers off the brake lever.

  • PUSH on the outside handlebar to initiate the turn
    • for left hand turns be wary of uneven REAR brake pressure and throttle control
    • for right hand turns by wary of uneven REAR brake pressure
  • Press the outside foot and (carefully) shift your butt on the seat towards the outside to help with balance
As a word of warning and to prevent physical injury to yourself (protect you knees and shoulders)...

DO NOT:
  • touch the FRONT brake with the handlebars turned
  • try to "throttle out" if you feel you are going to fall over. Put your foot down, square the handlebars and then stop....try again.
  • try to pivot on your foot that you put down to "save" the turn.... square the handlebars and then stop and collect yourself and try again.
  • try to save your bike from falling over....its going to happen while you are learning this so be pro-active and add some patio cushions, pool noodles, or some sort padding to the passenger plastics to keep them safe/scratch free....just step off and let it gently take a nap on the ground.
  • forget to wear your gear (helmet at least)
RELAX and be in the zone! Its all about confidence and technique.

Your Burgman WILL do a full lock turn in a typical 16ft (5-ish meter) 2 car driveway. A big enough driveway can accommodate a figure 8 pattern.
 

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Dude what took you so long to get here....wonderful posts.

Where are you located ?
 

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drphilld. Myslelf and I'm sure everyone that read this post would love to see the video of you practicing (like you mentioned). I personally would absolutely love to see you concur weight, balance, and physics! So PLEASE post some of your magical videos so we all can learn and get some more pointers.
Thanks again. Can't wait to see them!
 
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