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Discussion Starter #1
(The manual calls the belt cover the "clutch" cover
and the rear end--the last two DRIVEN shafts--the
"transmission"--cover.)

I had MY belt/clutch cover off to change my
belt and rollers and a guy I know has the dreaded
rear drive bearing noise. I told him I would remove
everything for him and he could try the bearing
removal himself. I felt I was kind of leaving him
out in the cold, so I decided to get a closer look
at things on mine since I had it almost apart.
(Duh, I should have tried looking at pictures in
the manual.) Anyway, I took the rear drive (transmission)
cover off mine, saw that the bearing is attached
firmly to both the cover and the shaft, a combination
I do not want to mess with on someone else's scooter.

But now I want to put mine back together and
the skinny o-ring for that cover makes me uneasy.
The manual clearly says on page 3-72 ,
"CAUTION Replace the O-ring with a new one."

But manuals always say those "correct" things. I would
like to hear that someone out there has successfully
reused their old o-ring and did not experience
subsequent leakage.

Thank you.
 

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Yes the manual says to replace the 'O'-Ring with a new one - why - The old one might have damage that you cannot see and it is a lot of work for a few cents, if you need to strip the part down and rework it because the 'O'-Ring is leaking.

I work in an environment where there are a lot of 'O'-Ring used and the only time we don't replace the is if we don't have either a spare or the right materials to make on (cord and glue).

The recommendation is that you replace it. Be careful of Nitrile 'O'-Ring's that have been burnt, they form phosphoric acid and the only way to remove it is amputation.

Replacement 'O'-Ring can be purchased from suppliers and are much cheaper than OEM, but make sure the material is fit for purpose.
 

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The clutch cover comes off easily by screwing an 8mm screw into the lowest hole to push the clutch cover off its bearing. But if you want to go further. be prepared with an effective method to remove and torque the shaft nuts when reassembling, since you need a means to hold the pulley and clutch while applying torque to the nuts.I jammed a 2x4 in the rear wheel spoke to torque~61 ft-lbs on the rear clutch nut ok, but so far I haven't been successful with the front pulley nut. I had used an electric impact wrench to remove the nuts easily, but this wrench's maximum torque in not controllable, so I need to hold the pulley and tighten to a hefty 76 ft-lbs torque. I have been replacing a snapped V-drive belt for my Suzuki Burgman AN400-K8.
I haven't been able to find a deep enough offset 24mm box wrench to work with an open end wrench holding the shaft yet. The closest thing to the holding tool mentioned in the shop manual I found seems like it would be too fragile to use- and an extended arm wasn't available. Broken fins have been reported by others, so being careful is required.
Right now, the best approach seems to use an impact wrench just sufficiently to GUESS at the right amount of torque to apply without stripping threads.
ANY SUGGESTIONS???
 

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Registered
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60 Posts
The clutch cover comes off easily by screwing an 8mm screw into the lowest hole to push the clutch cover off its bearing. But if you want to go further. be prepared with an effective method to remove and torque the shaft nuts when reassembling, since you need a means to hold the pulley and clutch while applying torque to the nuts.I jammed a 2x4 in the rear wheel spoke to torque~61 ft-lbs on the rear clutch nut ok, but so far I haven't been successful with the front pulley nut. I had used an electric impact wrench to remove the nuts easily, but this wrench's maximum torque in not controllable, so I need to hold the pulley and tighten to a hefty 76 ft-lbs torque. I have been replacing a snapped V-drive belt for my Suzuki Burgman AN400-K8.
I haven't been able to find a deep enough offset 24mm box wrench to work with an open end wrench holding the shaft yet. The closest thing to the holding tool mentioned in the shop manual I found seems like it would be too fragile to use- and an extended arm wasn't available. Broken fins have been reported by others, so being careful is required.
Right now, the best approach seems to use an impact wrench just sufficiently to GUESS at the right amount of torque to apply without stripping threads.
ANY SUGGESTIONS???
To be absolutely correct with the torque the amount of rotation of the nut is calculated , (this requires thread pitch). The nut is then rotated through this angle to get the correct torque. That can be done even with an impact hammer if you have problem to hold the unit from rotating. Just need to mark the shaft and the nut and take it easy so you don't over tighten and nut and damage the shaft or the threads. I trust this helps.
 

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The o rings originally used are cheap nitrile o rings if viton are used they withstand temperature which deteriorates a nitrile o ring I install viton and then just inspect them not automatically changing them. Interesting we never talk about routinely changing the o rings in the brake system for example as the o rings wear by friction over time and we seem to respond only when they leak but a static o ring on a drain plug gets attention for changing. hmmmm
 
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