Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well I finely got around to going to the SS office to see about retirement benefits. Seems I have lived a very -how shall I put it- non productive life ?
According to them I can get the minimum having just barely gotten the needed 4"quarters" in. :(
38 years running my own business you would think I should have made some money- I don't know, maybe because it was a 97% (cash no receipt) service, and I am a lousy book keeper. :?
Maybe that had something to do with it . :wink:
But there is a light at the end of the tunnel . My wife (rest her soul) retired after 30 years with the Phone company and I get hers.
Now before you ask what in the he** does this have to do with scooters, I believe in using a "windfall" to good advantage so I am calling Corbin and ordering a seat. :lol:
Besides this is the tavern, don't have to talk scooters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,919 Posts
Randy - Get the seat. I hope corbin makes a good one for your bike. I like mine, but I am putting my stock one back on real soon and buying that lil stock extender job that our friend here on the forum has available. I will ultimately sell my Moon with the Corbin job just cause.

I have had many rpts from ss over the last 25/30 years. (I would have been an E9 retired by now - 24 years later...) They all have seemed pretty optimistic. But, with only my hs diploma and with slightly less than a 3/4s of a five figures "thing" to plug into the equasion, it can get exasperating trying to deduce what the heck ill be worth (at 63) in 2023. Maybe retire or hit the bricks at 90/yr? Yeah - fat chance.

Either way - it'll prolly be not much.

The v/good thing is is that i have a house (that has, thankfully, doubled in value since four years ago) and a small 104k deal (should be bigger but, the ex, child support etc... sigh).

I dunno. Beingz that I am only 44, and feeling like 63 already, it just pisses me off that I didn't get "into" real-estate sooner and divested better.

just a stupid .02.

pedz.

flop scooters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
I took an early retirement in 2002.

I probably don't have enough money to stay "retired".

I am definitely having too much fun to go back to work.

I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
Boy am I glad

Pauljo,

I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up either! Kindered spirits!

Not that I bounce from job to job but I keep trying things I would like to do and keep coming back to technology...I hate computers but unfortunately for me I have an affinity with them and I'm good at what I do :roll: so I'm doing the webmaster thing AGAIN.

Peter Pan didn't want to grow up so why should we?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Growing old is mandatory, growing up is not. I have next to nothing in retirement savings and I'm fast approaching 50. A lot of my peers are in the same boat and most of us do not have inheritances to look forward to either. That's ok though, we enjoy life for what it is and we stop and smell what ever is in front of us. It doesn't have to be roses. Sometimes we smell the horse apples and have a good chuckle about how stupid we've been!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
I regret having started taking my SS when I hit 62. I should have wiped out my IRA & 401k instead & then started the SS. The problem is the tax on SS benifits kicks in as soon as I start withdrawing from my retirement accounts. It would have taken me several years to wipe them out & then I would have gotten more out of SS & not had to pay much if any tax on it.
As it is now we may have to get a divorce to get the money out of our retirement accounts. (Much higher limit for two singles than a married couple.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Although I'm a very responsible person, I've always figured I'd probably have to work til I die and never really given retirement much thought.

Susan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
haven't posted in a while, busy racking up miles on my an400, but with my meager hospital retirement,and ss, i have about 120,000 in my 403b, putting about a combined 800 /month in that and my roth ira, hoping to have 300,000 there at age 62 when i want to call it quits,i am encoraging my kids to start early saving for their retirement, i am 49 now and started in my early 30's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Well congratulations Randy on having a sugar mama! So now you can live on her retirement and scoot off merrily ever after. :lol:

Pete it is not too late for you to put money aside for your retirement and invest in some real estate. Better a little now than nothing later on.

I'm not in such great shape either having gotten a divorce after 25 yrs. of marriage. But I am trying to do my best to put as much as I can into retirement. However I probably will not be able to retire until I am 70. I cannot believe the difference in monthy pay from 67 to 70.

The major trick here is to stay as healthy and wreck free as possible.
Best of luck to all of us.

Evelyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Evelyn wrote (snipped)
Well congratulations Randy on having a sugar mama! So now you can live on her retirement and scoot off merrily ever after
.

Not really....... the money and the scoot mean nothing without her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
'Tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all....
-Alfred Lord Tennyson

Dean
32 and perpetually single :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
Maybe more appropriately:

Love begins with a smile, grows with a kiss, and ends with a teardrop.
-Anonymous
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Dean,

I'm sorry, I'm not being mean, but Tennyson is full of horse****. I lost mine 6 years ago the 22nd of this month after 17 years of being married, raising our son & living the "American Dream". Since then the dream has become a nightmare and I suffer badly during the holidays, but even worse in May.

When you lose someone you love like that, it's like having a large chunk of your heart ripped out of your chest. The bad part is, it doesn't heal, nor does it grow back. You exist with a big chunk of "me" missing.

Methinks Lord Tennyson should have tried it before opening his mouth (or pen, I guess).

Your second quote strikes closer to the mark, Dean. Again, I'm not picking on you, just venting some of the anguish I carry all year long, it just seems to grow significantly in May.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
No offense taken. This is the Tavern -- the place to 'cry a tear in your beer', as the country song goes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Wyldman,

I am sorry to hear about your loss. Your heart will get better with time if you can let go. With that much time invested in a marriage there will be a void and a chunk missing within you. Hopefully you will have a chance to visit with your son. If you have not attended a divorce support group yet, you may be pleasantly suprised at what you can learn and who you can meet there.

For me the holidays are 100% better without my ex, because he was really ugly around that time. So for the past 6 years after a 25 year marriage, I am extremely grateful for having the opportunity to enjoy the holdays with my grown children and parents.

So hang in there, if you are willing to work at your pain, time does heal and mend the broken heart (not completely) but better than were you are now.

Evelyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Thanks Evelyn, I appreciate your kind words. Unfortunately, from time to time, what is normally manageable kind of overwhelms and spills over, that post was one of those times.

I apologize to all for having hijacked this thread, and now return you to your regularly scheduled program.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
My grandmother live until she was 92 when she refused to fight the third bout of breast cancer she had. The last time I visited her I asked her how she had survived that long. Her answer was "By the time you're my age all your friends and most of your family and most of the people you knew in your younger years will have passed on. To live this long you have to deal with grief. You have to get through it and get past it. You can't let it eat you up. "

If you've lost a loved one, it's easy to understand the hurt and hole it creates in your heart. You can read every week where someone passes away just a few weeks after his/her spouse passed away. They die of their broken heart. I can't tell you HOW to get past the grief. I can only tell you there IS a future after the grief, and that you can get past it. As I've lost family and friends, the thing I do that helps me heal is to write down all my feelings at the time. It lets me get them out of me. It puts those thoughts away where I can find them if I need to, so I don't need to keep them within me.

I hope this helps.

Dave B.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,258 Posts
Wyldman,

I agree with you on Tennyson. I lost my wife of 36 years June 29, 2004 to a heart defect we did not know she had. I don't think you ever get over it but you have to learn to live with it. There are still times when something will set me off and I tear up. Thank heavens for the kids and grandkids.

On the up side I was saving for two of us to live on when I retire so I probably will not have many money problems.

The postings on SS and taxes are really true. When my father died my mom's income went down but her taxes went up because she went over the threshold to have her SS income taxed with the lower deductions for a single person! Taxing SS is one of those things I just don't understand. Unfortunately most of us will be paying it because they did not index the threshold to inflation.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top