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Actually it's the second belt. This is Robin's old bike. The primary pulley bearing in the CVT went out at around 50,000 miles. When the Suzuki shop rebuilt it she had them put a new belt in it even though the original belt appeared to still be in good shape. Unfortunately when they did the rebuild the extended maintenance folks would not authorize a new outer case half which the mechanic said it needed. He was right and it only went a few hundred miles before the primary pulley bearing failed again. They did another rebuild on the extended maintenance folks dime this time replacing the outer case half. They did not however replace the belt. They used the one they put in on the first build as it only had a few hundred miles. So the CVT was rebuilt twice in a few hundred miles but only one belt was put in it.

On the first ride after that rebuild a bearing in the transmission failed. We think they forgot to refill the transmission with oil when they did the CVT rebuild but we have no proof of that. Anyway they have to pull the engine again and split the crankcase to fix the transmission bearing. The CVT was removed when that was done but they did not open it up.

As for why the belt broke with only about 44,000 miles on it, I don't really know. Only thing I can surmise is the failure after the first rebuild and the failure of the bearing in the transmission both but stress on the belt early in it's life and that may have shortened it's life span. There does not appear to be anything else amiss in the CVT that would cause it. The one in my CVT went twice that mileage before it broke.
 

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My comment would be that if you can pull the engine in the RD you can pull the CVT in the 650. Using the method Dan and I are using it would be a one workday job. Half a day to pull it apart and another half a day to put it back together when the parts come in. All you need is hand tools. A couple of "special tools" are called for but you can easily substitute readily available hand tools for those. Many folks fear it because they look at the bike and all they see is the body work. Once you remove the body work the bike is put together much like any other bike.

As for putting miles on it. The chances are you will be well north of 50,000 miles before you ever have to start worrying about the CVT and probably closer to 100,000. So ride the thing.
 

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If you look at Dan's second picture right at the top edge above and slightly left of the where the radiator hose connects to the thermostat housing you will see the hole where the top mount bolt goes through the frame.

If you look at the engine down under the thermostat housing below the frame you will see where the bottom front bolt goes through the engine mount. The hole in the frame is above it hidden in the picture by the floorboard bracket and radiator hose.
 

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As for removing them. You hold the bolt on one side of the engine with a wrench and screw the nut off the end on the other side of the engine. Once the nut is off just pull the bolt out. Be sure to support the engine from underneath before you do that though. The back will be supported by the center stand but you will need something under the front. That is what the floor jack in the picture is for.
 

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You'll notice in the picture I work best with my tongue sticking out a little ;)

As Dan said, putting the bike back together went mostly good. Getting the splines aligned when stabbing the CVT was a little harder than with the unit sitting out in the open. Took us three or four tries to get it right then it slid right in.

When we lowered the frame back down the rubber boots between the air box and the top of the throttle bodies got rolled under and we could not get them straightened back out because of the tight fit between the top of the air box and the ABS unit. In retrospect it probably would have been better to remove the air box before lowering the frame down. On a standard model it would not be a problem but on the Exec with the ABS module just barely clearing the top of the air box it gets in a bind. I ended up taking the whole filter box/air box assembly off to get it straightened out.
 

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I would guess that most folks could accomplish it in no more than 8 to 10 man hours. Of course I had the advantage of already having the set of special tools I made when I pulled my CVT. Someone doing it for the first time would have to spend a little time cobbling those together.
 
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