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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after installing the 2 bearings in the clutch I decided to remove the bearing from the clutch cover and repack it with grease.
‘there are 2 Phillips screws holding down 2 clips to keep the bearing in place. Those 2 screws are frozen in place.
‘Now keep in mind, you can’t get rough with this process as that metal cover “although strong” is so fragil in many ways. I do have a hammer impact. You know, you put it on the screw and hit it while the blow of the hammer ratchets it loose (you hope).
‘I’m certain this cover is too fragile for this. I flipped the cover over and the screw holes go the whole way thru, so I put some panther piss in there and heated with my little torch. No good….. I have the screw holes full of lubricant soaking. Not sure what else I can do. Right now I could put some grease on that bearing but it would not be like packing it. I can then put the cover back on bearing. I really don’t want to cut the clips holding down this bearing. You can see in the pics, this bearing needs packed.

Any ideas will be appreciated.

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When I pulled my cover off the first time the bearing stayed on the shaft and bent the two clips. My two screws broke loose so I don't know what to tell you. I would just grease the one side of the bearing and put the cover back on. I don't believe there is a lot of force from the shaft on that bearing.

Looks like one of the two bolts is starting to strip already. I would give them a tap with the impact wrench. I have had good luck with the impact wrench on my front brake rotors breaking loose the two holding screws on the rotors.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So after some research I went down to the laboratory ummm errrr workshop and mixed some acetone and atf (equal parts) mixed them well and filled the holes in pics 1 & 2. I’ll let that soak overnight and try it in the morning after I move all this snow we are getting in Pa tonight. Their saying we should get a foot of snow!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I pulled my cover off the first time the bearing stayed on the shaft and bent the two clips. My two screws broke loose so I don't know what to tell you. I would just grease the one side of the bearing and put the cover back on. I don't believe there is a lot of force from the shaft on that bearing.

Looks like one of the two bolts is starting to strip already. I would give them a tap with the impact wrench. I have had good luck with the impact wrench on my front brake rotors breaking loose the two holding screws on the rotors.
‘Uncle Fester, As in the prior post, I went to the laboratory and made a potion to help out.
‘You are correct on all counts, I want to do the very best I can with this scooter. I think she’ll be allot of fun when the weather breaks. Appreciate your feedback!
 

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The bolts may have thread locker, need to apply heat with a heath gun/hair dryer, directly on bolt hole on outside of cover, when nice and hot flip over and remove bolts, rinse and repeat as needed, after pieces are off, heat cover again around the bearing area, have a wooden board/table ready and maybe a heavy rag over it(to protect gasket, etc.), after heating tap cover on table bearing side down, bearing should fall out, rinse and repeat as needed.

PSA, a sealed bearing should never be repacked, the seals are permanent, if bearing is rough, is compromised IME, the grease you are using may not be compatible with oem grease, a chemical reaction could cause loss of lubrication/bearing failure, seen this a lot in my years in aviation, mechanics using wrong grease !!. Not all is lost, If your able to remove bearing, wash old grease out with brake cleaner, etc. "Do not remove seal/shield on other side of bearing", pack with fresh grease and install removed seal, if you feel the seal is not secure, reinstall with removed seal facing cover(flip bearing), jic the seal comes loose, wont contaminate clutch, etc. BTW the cover bearing is a load bearing, there's a lot of weight/stress on rear driveng pulley shaft, when you are pushing 600lbs of bike and rider.

BTW bearing is very common 6007-2RS, 60072RS or 6007DDU, fairly common size, about $10-15, not oem $50 (n)
 

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BTW, forgot to mention freezing bearing(no problem in your area:unsure:) and warming cover real good the bearing will drop right in when installing. Also use gloves when handling hot parts, :whistle:
 
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I wonder if we can have a pinned thread for replacement bearing part numbers for the clutch assembly and case. Administrator?
 
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It seems to me that the first time I threaded 8mm (?) bolts into the cover, to remove, the tabs simply broke off? At any rate, that was 9 yrs ago, running with no retainer since.
Maybe PB Blaster soak + heat.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well you all were correct…. I think those screws are welded in there! So I did the best I could to cleanly get grease in that bearing. I put the bearing cover back on and it’s good to go.

I do like Festers idea about pinning the bearing identifications. If you let me know where to email the numbers, I’d be happy to help out. I can simply forward the slip they emailed me.
 

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I sent a note to the administrator to see if they can pin this thread.
 
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Driven/Rear Pulley Bearings:* Same p/n's are used on all B400/USA models 2003-2019*.

The only bearing that's propietary Suzuki oem is the needle bearing 21214-15F00 $30+, unobtainium otherwise o_O
The internal/small ball bearing is 6904-2RS** or 6904-DDU, cvt cover large bearing is 6007-2RS or 6007-DDU, both are readily available on Ebay, etc.
OEM beaings are "KOYO", but brands like SKF, Timken, NTN, Nachi, etc are good, BTW look out for scammers on Ebay, a $5 dollar branded bearing might be a fake :unsure:. Expect to pay $10-15 for branded.

** 6904-2RS bearing is double sealed and lubed for life, will outlast oem. You can remove one seal if you prefer to match oem.
 

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zrx212 Thank you. This is now a permanent sticky at the top of Burgman 400 2007 to present. By the time I'm ready to change them out it will be easy to locate.
 

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zrx212 Thank you. This is now a permanent sticky at the top of Burgman 400 2007 to present. By the time I'm ready to change them out it will be easy to locate.
Good deal, maybe the OP can change/add to thread title to reflect more on content/info, suggestion " CVT Cover Bearing Removal and Alternate P/N info " :unsure:

I have searched and don't see a comprehensive/detailed build of front or rear pulley assy, I've have sourced all new parts to basically build a complete new rear pulley assy and new sheaves for front, waiting on a few misc. seals, etc to arrive. Will do a full pictorial of process then. These wil be my quick change spares, got a deal on 3 NOS pulley faces, could not pass up (y) IAC Suzuki parts are not getting any cheaper :mad:
 

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A little more information on what's the different bearing suffix means on the seal type. Either bearing type will work good on the rear pulley assy, no real cost difference, I prefer the DDU because is more durable and should last the life of the pulley, do not remove seals, if using 2RS is better to remove seal similar to oem.

Ex. 6904-2RS, Non-contact seal bearing, have a positive connection with one race and sort of “float” against the other,
have lower friction, and thus lower resistance to the elements. IOW not 100% sealed, usually used on wheels because of less friction with additional weather seal or used in dry areas.

Ex. 6904-DDU, Contact seals bearings have a positive seal connection to the inner and outer races, have better weather resistance, IOW weather sealed, usually referred as boat bearings. They have a little more friction initially, but are lubed/sealed for life.
 
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