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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 2007 Burgman 650 last summer (July 2013) with only 2,300 miles on it. I'm thinking about changing the spark plugs out soon since I'm up to just over 7K miles.

My question: I'm a little concerned about removing the plugs after they've been in for 7 years. Has anyone else done this? I'm worried the threads from the head are going to come out with the plugs. Usually, I make it a point of replacing plugs on new vehicles within a couple of years and using anti-seize on the threads.

Obviously, I would use the normal safety precautions to include doing it while the engine is overnight cold.

BTW - Why is it that cars with electronic ignition and using unleaded fuel can go up to 100K miles on plugs but the Burgman is only 7,500 miles?

Any other comments or suggestions? Thanks.
 

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It is unclear WHY Suzuki set the sparkplug change interval so short. IMHO it is a waste and I DO NOT DO IT. I am at 56,000 miles and I replaced my OEM plugs at about 27,000 miles just because I found the set of Iridium's from my 03 650. I put them in and never looked at them again. At 27,000 miles and 4 years old I would have just re-gapped and lightly brushed them with a stainless brush and stuck them back in

You should have no problems due to years setting in the head. Pull them if it worries ya but like said, needless IMHO.
 

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Can't help you much with getting the plugs out. Just go easy and hope for the best.

As for changing the plugs out. I don't change mine at 7500 miles. I change them when I check the valves at 20,000 to 25,000 mile intervals. I don't use iridium plugs, just standard NGK plugs. Even at those intervals they still look good.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Two good replies from two respected members. Thanks.

I may wait until the end of "prime riding season" and change them at about 10-12K. That way if I strip something out, I have all winter to get it fixed. Hate to have the bike down when it's nice outside.
 

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I wouldn't change them as long as it runs good. I have 19,000 on my 09 and I don't plan on changing mine for several more years. One member had 70k+ on his and it still ran fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wouldn't change them as long as it runs good. I have 19,000 on my 09 and I don't plan on changing mine for several more years. One member had 70k+ on his and it still ran fine.
Thanks. I'm not worried about them being "worn out" at this point, but more concerned about them sticking since they've been in 7 years.
 

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I finally changed my plug on my 07 this year after 32k miles. Still looked good and had absolutely no problem getting it out.

Change if you like, but probably doesn't need it.
 

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I pulled Mine @15 K it was like new. I did go ahead and replace it when it was out... Seven years won't make it hard to come out, you should be fine.

If you want to loosen off and tighten it back up again for reassurance it's only about 10 minute Job.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone. I feel better about not tearing into it right away.
 

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Yeah, they'll come out with no problems. So don't worry on that score. When you put new ones back, do not use anti seize. It just isn't needed and can make stripping or damaging the threads much more likely. Dry threads will only strip out if they have been over torqued. They only have to be nipped up lightly, 11nm on the 400 and whatever it is on the 650. 7500 miles is a little early to change NGK plugs but most manufacturers seem to recommend that mileage over here in urop for standard spark plugs. They can go longer but 10k is the key point when the internal insulation starts to break down and corrosion sets in and the voltage requirement to fire the plug goes up exponentially. You cannot tell how good a spark plug is by looking at it. The electrode may look new condition masking the internal wear on the insulation. At 20k miles the average standard resistor spark plug requires 50% more voltage to fire the plug and keep the same normal spark size. And of course, your bike cannot deliver that so the plug produces a smaller spark under compression equaling less mpg, less performance. This shows up on the dyno very clearly before and after fitting new ones. Big difference in most cases. It also makes your coil/s run hotter which can cause earlier failure if running old plugs. That's all common knowledge in the motor trade but needs repeating now and again. I change mine at 7500 miles because it's a two cent item and is easy to do, even on the 650 once you've done it a time or two.
 

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On my 650K4, getting the radiator to cooperate and stay out of the way was more difficult than actually changing the plugs (i.e. the whole job was pretty easy). I was too lazy to figure out how to get my torque wrench in there so I torqued them by hand using a gentle touch. Coming up on 10k miles later, no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmm... found this NGK Tech Bulletin:

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-0630111antisieze.pdf

All
NGK Spark Plugs are manufactured with a special trivalent Zinc
-
chromate shell plating
that is designed to prevent both corrosion and seizure to the cylinder head; Thus eliminating the need
for any thread compounds or lubricants.


 

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Yeah, they'll come out with no problems. So don't worry on that score. When you put new ones back, do not use anti seize. It just isn't needed and can make stripping or damaging the threads much more likely. Dry threads will only strip out if they have been over torqued. They only have to be nipped up lightly, 11nm on the 400 and whatever it is on the 650. 7500 miles is a little early to change NGK plugs but most manufacturers seem to recommend that mileage over here in urop for standard spark plugs. They can go longer but 10k is the key point when the internal insulation starts to break down and corrosion sets in and the voltage requirement to fire the plug goes up exponentially. You cannot tell how good a spark plug is by looking at it. The electrode may look new condition masking the internal wear on the insulation. At 20k miles the average standard resistor spark plug requires 50% more voltage to fire the plug and keep the same normal spark size. And of course, your bike cannot deliver that so the plug produces a smaller spark under compression equaling less mpg, less performance. This shows up on the dyno very clearly before and after fitting new ones. Big difference in most cases. It also makes your coil/s run hotter which can cause earlier failure if running old plugs. That's all common knowledge in the motor trade but needs repeating now and again. I change mine at 7500 miles because it's a two cent item and is easy to do, even on the 650 once you've done it a time or two.
Excellent advice, spark plugs are cheap. Changing them out is really the thing to do.

Greg
 

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Absolutely well said by quantum,

this is especially so with platinum and iridium plugs. You can pull Platnum plug at 100,000 miles and the tip will show no wear, that's why it's made of platinum.

I had a Kawasaki one time that would blow the spark plug every 25,000 miles (I was doing it as a test and also using an ocsilicope to look for higher resistances over time) which causes slower burntime and requires higher kilovolt to overcome the higher resistance.

The tip would always looked like new but the resistor would break down mostly from heat and exhaustion.

I take back what I said about pulling a plug and just looking at the tip to check it, I suppose what I meant was 3000 miles it wouldn't really require new plug unless the engine has been overheated and that can burn up a spark resistor.

I am very guilty of milking a spark plug on my bike, I know firsthand I shouldn't but I do it only on my bike. I think I like to just break the rules and see how well it would do. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks everyone. After your advice and reading the NGK Tech Bulletin I posted in Post #12 above, I'm now not too concerned about them stripping the threads out. I will probably replace them this fall after prime riding season. I should have 10-11K miles by then.
 

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Most spark plugs thread damage I have ever seen has been because of over torquing, i've never seen a damage thread because of use of anti seize. Manufacturers are trying to eliminate any possibility of human error in installation... In 25 years I have never had a spark plug come loose because of anti-seize...ever!!!!!

One common complaint in automotive industry is the human error factor, and manufacturers are looking to eliminate that. Anti-seize in itself one will not cause a problem it's just that it lubricates the torque spec so 11 foot-pounds could end up being 15 foot-pounds.

There are also so many situations of people doing them just snug or hand tight, which is a crucial mistake, (hand tight or snug) to pee wee hurman is different to Arnold the lion heart. Hand-tight or snug creates a huge margin of human error, which is like...drive at a reasonable speed, is that 20mph or 80mph?

All spark plugs must be installed with a torque wrench to take out the human factor input.

Manufacturers are now designing spark plugs where no anti-seize is required to eliminate the human factor.... It cost them money and lawsuits and warrantees and that is just the way it is in big business, and they try hard to teach that out there and spread the word, but most importantly they are trying to Manufacture components that take out the human input as much as possible...

(It really reduces costs tremendously, they are constantly dealing with warrantee on components that are not defective because he was misdiagnosed, over torqued , electrical problems, and most importantly just human error cost them more in returns than anything else).. True words spoken from my Napa rep!

How many people replace the starting motor, but never do a voltage drop test on both sides of the circuit, they then burn then the new starter out in three months and take it back under warranty and say it's defective? Uhh huh!
 

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There is one scenario where a plug installed with anti-seize will actually blow out of the head, and that is, if the engine has detonation. Remember the thread is a ramp, and detonation acts like an impact driver, vectoring the straight line force into a turning moment.

That is why some people go their whole lifetime using anti seize with no problems - its because they never had a detonating engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
There is one scenario where a plug installed with anti-seize will actually blow out of the head, and that is, if the engine has detonation. Remember the thread is a ramp, and detonation acts like an impact driver, vectoring the straight line force into a turning moment.

That is why some people go their whole lifetime using anti seize with no problems - its because they never had a detonating engine.
You sound like my son talking. (He has degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering :))
 

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I don't know why you wouldn't use Never Seize. That's what it is made for- steel spark plugs vs. aluminum head.
My girlfriend has a Saturn L200 (4 cylinder). 2002. Had never changed plugs (she bought it new). 12 years later, it was running poorly and throwing codes. I put new spark plugs in it (200,000 miles) and it runs fine. No problem getting the old plugs out. And I used Never Seize and a torque wrench on the new ones.
Personally, I don't mind putting a new NGK in the Burgman at the specified interval. After all, it's ONE spark plug ;)
 
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