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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since this is unique to the 2013 and newer Burgman 650 I am posting in that model's sub-forum
( @Dave_J , sticky thread? Or move it to where you feel is best )

The rear tire on my Burgman 650 was rather done after only 6008 miles since I last replaced it. These have been the Bridgestone TH01 tires front and rear. 2 out of every 3 wear bars were showing even with the tread and some of those were where both tread and wear bar were being worn down a bit. I really don't like wearing off more rubber than that since belts will start to be revealed very soon after.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/nTLQbAFKGF7r4PcC9

I decided to only replace the rear tire at this time since there is still a few thousand miles left up front. I also decided to remove the wheel and take it in to the dealer to have the tire replaced. After reviewing the steps to remove the rear wheel and also watching @LeDude 's video on it I felt it would be easy to adjust from the video for the differences between the earlier model in the video from the current model in my garage. And there are a few significant differences. This proved to be a very good decision on my part since I was being quoted close to $350 to take the whole scoot in for the dealer to replace rubber on both front and rear with their stock tire. $250 to do the same using the tires I provided. I already bought tires and was intending to have mine mounted. If I remove the wheel myself and take it in I was told it would be around $75 to replace one tire if the bearings also needed to be replaced and only $29 just to replace the tire if the bearings are good. These charges are before sales tax and shop supplies added in. My local Suzuki shop is reasonable so I do trust them to do it right and be fair about the charges. Turns out the bearings were checked as good and total bill to swap the rubber on the rear wheel including sales tax and supplies came to $32.28. Not bad. Many years ago I had an independent shop swap tires on a different bike and they charged $35 +tax, but that was me taking the bike in to let them do it all. Still not bad. (all prices subject to change in the future and may differ in your area).

The tires I chose are the Shinko SR568 160/60-14 Rear Tire and Shinko SR567 120/70-15 Front Tire ordered from J&P Cycles. I found a lot of good reviews on these and if they last as long as the stock TH01 tires they will be a very good investment since the cost for BOTH of these including tax came to $105.91. That's about the same as just the front TH01 tire which is significantly less than the cost of just the rear TH01!

So I decided since there is not yet photo documented information for removing the rear wheel on the 2013 and newer Burgman 650 I would provide that here. Some of the differences from LeDude's video and earlier models:
IIRC the video shows a non-ABS scoot and all 2013 and newer models do have ABS so there will be the speed sensor at the ABS ring to remove on the newer scoot.
The rear brake caliper on the older models is to the rear of and below the swing arm but the caliper is to the front and below the swing arm on the newer scoots.
Also, it is possible to remove the rear caliper on the newer model scoots without first removing the parking brake assembly (brake lock).

Other than those items you can learn a lot from the video before starting this and with the aid of the service manual (always highly recommended for doing ANY of your own work on this scoot) it is a lot easier than you would think. I only have a full set of common tools, as well as a few torque wrenches and large and small ratchet handles with metric sockets and a good set of open/box wrenches from 6mm to 19mm. One of my large torque wrenches (I have 2 of those) is way out of tolerance so I use that one only as a breaker bar. It was cheap and works well in its new task.

So here goes.

I put the scoot up on the center stand with a block of wood under the center stand feet. I actually put 2 flat boards under my center stand compared with LeDude's video showing one. It helped rolling the rear tire up onto a board first and then put it up on the center stand on the blocks. Per a recommendation from somewhere else I then used a ratchet strap through the front wheel to ensure the center stand didn't fold up if the scoot was bumped forward hard. I then added more blocks under the rear tire to help support it when I dropped it off the swing arm. This setup can be seen in a few of the photos attached.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/RYTcz5UQnX9cEFdw9

Here is the page out of the manual outlining the simple steps. It's short and there really is not more to it than this unless you intend to do a lot more maintenance while the wheel is off.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/4MwJRimnmxXNfsLv8

Any time I plan to do maintenance that may include work on or near the final drive I remove the final drive cover first. It's a little out of sequence in the steps but since it really doesn't matter I just get that off right away. The 2013 and newer model Burgman 650 has body plastic that is in front of the forward most bolt for the final drive cover, but I can reach and remove it easily using my 8mm open/box wrench.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/HpEwyEJdvcj6rK1i6

Next up is to remove the rear wheel speed sensor. It is easy to reach and easy to remove the bolt using a socket. I just let that hang over the final drive out of the way. The SM shows to remove a holder plate and clip but really no need to do that here.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/CmuZXc4Pn9RStWuT7

Now remove the rear brake caliper. The SM calls for removing the clip that holds the brake hose and brake lock cable but mine refused to be removed without starting the round out the bolt head so I left it. I could see that the only reason to remove it was to provide more slack in the brake hose and also enable easier removal of the brake lock (parking brake) assembly from the caliper which I didn't see the need to do for the task at hand. The brake lock cable slides out of the clip anyway and there is plenty of slack in the hose to remove the caliper and keep it away from the brake disk to remove the wheel without doing all this.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Q812a27fytHE9wRQ8

Next I jump right to removing the caliper from the disk and swing arm. The upper caliper mounting bolt is slightly behind the bare cable for the brake lock but there is enough slack in that cable to put a socket on the bolt to remove it as long as you don't try to drop the caliper off the disk until after that bolt is fully removed. This is to prevent clamping the caliper which can possibly cause an issue with the brake pistons moving too far out. I point out the 2 mounting bolts that need to be removed with my index finger and thumb in this photo.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/RGUC35QGx8Fg3zdb9

Take care to drop the caliper off the disk moving it a little down and forward. You likely will have to turn the rear wheel a bit to help it slide off. Don't squeeze the caliper for the same reason as stated just above. When I removed the caliper off the disk I then followed LeDude's excellent advise and placed a bit of hard board (what I had handy) or you can use wood wedges as in LeDude's video between the brake pads. I added rubber bands to hold the hard board in the caliper. I used a short bungee cord to support the caliper away while removing the wheel.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/TD9hEgaVSgvBWXBw5

...Continued in my next post.
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Continued from previous post...

Now we come to removing the rear axle. As seen in the photo here there is no cotter pin on my scoot as there is in the older model used in the video. This is where I used a 24mm socket on my breaker bar/torque wrench handle for the right side nut and a 22mm socket in my large ratchet handle for the left side bolt head/axle rod. Pulling in opposite directions cancelled out any forces that would otherwise knock the scoot over. Once the nut and associated washer/spacer is off the axle can be slid out the left side out of the final drive case. I started by tapping on the threaded end with a hammer to give it an initial push out. I needed to twist it a bit and manually turned the wheel a little to work it out the rest of the way.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/C2D9BvYo89j9YL729
https://photos.app.goo.gl/sh7sBnJcuVrPkzq66

Then the 2 right side spacers will need to be removed. Take note which direction and order these spacers are installed. Remove the outer spacer first by sliding it around while supporting the wheel until it drops out. Then the inner spacer can be pulled out from within the wheel and removed.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/WihvBUuSbmtRqD1p9

At this point the wheel is free to be removed by pulling it to the right to remove it from meshing with the spline drive gear in the final drive case. I needed to turn and maybe tip it back and forth a little to work it off the spline drive gear. This is where having those extra blocks under the wheel comes in handy to support the wheel. Then as I supported the wheel I removed the extra blocks from under it and set the wheel on the floor. I removed it from under the rear fender same as you can see in LeDude's video. I felt the extra block I put under the center stand helped a little to fit it out from under the fender. I pulled it out to the left side of the fender being careful not to damage the ABS ring or any other parts of the wheel hub or gear.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/zj1D5g8WLJS1m8Lh8

Also as mentioned in the video it is a good time to clean out the final drive spline gear ring area while the wheel is off. I didn't do this yet but I will before reinstalling the wheel (will be adding to this thread with that info and photos coming soon). I'll need to "paint" fresh moly onto that spline drive gear during reinstall. I did pull out the left spacer and inspected it, then put it right back in since it looked to be clean and in very good condition. Plus I didn't want to chance putting it back in backwards if I left it out.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/vxJPbyXanZ6BUBJQ6

Here is a photo of all parts/hardware removed for this:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/M1rGxEFe2EJK3t9q6

I will be reporting in following posts about installing the wheel. I did just today get my wheel with new tire mounted back from the Suzuki shop but won't have time for the install for a few days.
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most definitely deserves a refreshing beverage!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Forgot to mention...
Make absolutely certain to choose a wedge/hardboard/something for putting between the brake pads that is at least the same thickness as the actual brake disk. This is not just to cushion between the pads but to prevent the caliper from clamping the pad together resulting in possible issues with the pistons moving too far out of their place. And also to protect the pads :)
The hardboard I used is the same thickness as the disk.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I finished doing what I was needing to get done today so decided to put the rear wheel back on the Burgman 650 this afternoon.

My first order of business was to clean off as much of the old spline past as I could from the final drive spline gear and the wheel spline gear. Then, using a cheap stiff paint brush, I "painted" a thin coating of new past onto the wheel spline gear. Only a thin coating is needed. Used the brush to completely coat the gear and get a coating down into the recess around the gear. Then I used the brush on the final drive spline gear just to use up what was still on the brush. BTW- Honda replaced their Moly-60 paste with what I show in the photo. M-77 Assembly Paste. I found out this is the one to use now instead of searching for the Moly-60.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/mM4GCYa77E2F4oN39
https://photos.app.goo.gl/KSKJzcq4WA4fTdU78

While I had the wheel off the scoot I covered the exposed final drive spline gear area with a plastic bag to prevent dirt and bugs from getting in there. After coating the spline gears with paste I then used that plastic bag, wrapped around my finger, to spread some red bearing grease into the opening for the axle in the final drive case.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/4d1dSWhfnLk8UMEB7

Then I fed the axle through that opening and, holding the left spacer in place, pushed the axle so the end is just at the end of the spacer. You can just see the end of the axle right at the end of the spacer in this photo.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/5X7vC9e31Ba7FHi4A

You can see here how I angled the wheel to fit in under the rear fender to get it in place. I put the wheel between the swing arm ends where it will go and then lifted it up putting some wood blocks under the wheel to support and help hold it up while putting it in place onto the final drive spline gear. I did have to turn and move the wheel a little to mesh the wheel and final drive gears.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/V54x6s2TRfwevgoYA

I then pushed the axle through the wheel hub wiggling the wheel some as I lined up the axle to fit through the wheel bearings. Don't force but twist the axle while moving the wheel around just a little and the axle slides right in. I pushed the axle through until it was just coming out the right side and then I put on the inner right spacer so that the end of the axle was just at the end of that. You can just see the end of the axle in the end of the inner spacer in this photo. Then I put on the outer right spacer being certain that the flair was going the to the outside. This took a little wiggling the wheel again to fit it in there since it fits somewhat tight.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/NtwAvy1uEM6Qm8Gj9

Then I pushed the axle the rest of the way through so the axle hex head was against the final drive case on the left and the threaded end was sticking out on the right. I then put the axle washer and nut on the threaded end. I forgot to get a photo before I put the axle nut on. The torque for the axle nut is 72.5 ft/lbs (100 N-M). I tightened the axle and axle nut to proper torque. Here you can see the axle all assembled and torqued. One end is just barely visible on the left and the other end is more clearly visible.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/31NfmpbS4mFuuomc9

Next is putting the rear brake caliper back on. I removed the rubber bands and wood spacer. Then worked the brake pads onto the brake disk while turning the wheel a little to help. The brake lock cable sheath is out of the clip above the caliper while putting the caliper back on the disk and then I put the cable sheath into the clip before proceeding.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/xWJ4Ub7H2QejkASx5

I then inserted the mounting bolts and torqued those as required. This photo shows how I get around the brake lock cable. No problem flexing the cable like this since it is really not straining the end of the sheath (even though the photo seems to be showing that). The torque for these bolts is 16.5 ft/lbs (23 N-M).
https://photos.app.goo.gl/3SbaAqG6amp1YJYZ7

Then on the left side I reinstalled the speed sensor and hand tightened the bolt. It is necessary to use a feeler gauge to verify the space between the speed sensor and the ABS ring while turning the wheel all the way around. There is a range of space that is needed to ensure the sensor is close enough but not touching at any point around the ABS ring. The clearance should be between 0.03 and 1.80 mm. I would have preferred using a flat feeler gauge for this but I can't find mine. I have 2 sets of the wire gauges so picked the closest pair to inside that range and tested. One point of my ABS ring was just a little too close but tapping on it carefully and lightly fixed that. The ring seems to be a very soft metal so easy to bend out of tolerance if not careful.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/6NwdAxVqvr1NLy9HA

All that's left now is to reinstall the final drive case cover, make sure there are no parts left over, check the tire psi front and rear, and go for a check ride.

Hope this thread is helpful to anyone who dares to remove and install their own wheel to take in for a tire change, or to change the tire themselves, or replace bearings or any other work that requires removing the rear wheel.
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Discussion Starter #6
After a 17 mile ride around town to verify nothing would fall off and to help seat the brake pads/caliper and also to just start scrubbing the tread of the new tires I determined my little adventure a success. Everything seemed to work just fine.

No determination yet on the performance of the new tire since I really cannot tell after only 17 miles. But I was able to tell that with my very conservative riding style I won't have much problem with the fact that now I have a bias ply tire on the rear with the radial tire on the front. Not usually a good combo but I'll soon be putting the other Shinko tire on the front in a few thousand miles.

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HeEEEYYY hellllp , somebldy kick me offa here, my computer froze and now I can't do anythig includig turn it off, had to borrow another computer to send this sos
 
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