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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
10 months ago I posted a thread showing how to remove and install the rear wheel for a tire change. This is (finally) how to do the same with front wheel.

The process is MUCH easier to remove and install the front than the rear. Still have to remove/install the front brake calipers on each side as well as the speed sensor to enable slipping the wheel out. I used a scissors jack on the front frame cross tube to lift the front of the Burgman and that worked great... as long as I used my jack with the better head for holding onto the frame tube and not tending to slide off. I have 3 jacks almost the same so was able to find the best one for the job.

I made a PDF document with photos for this job so feel free to download the document or ask (in a PM, er, "conversation") if you want a copy emailed. The document is attached at the end of this post

Don't post your actual email address in any open forum post. Hackers love it when you do that so they can add that info to your dossier that they collect on everyone they can.

And a photo or two just for tease.
Old tire with 10,971 miles on it.
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New tire now needing to be scrubbed in.
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I put a Shinko SR567 on the front to (finally) match the Shinko SR568 on the rear. I am expecting to replace the rear long before this front is half way through its life.

Oh, to remove the front axle you can either buy the official Suzuki "special tool" for over $100 or look around for the best deal on a 12 mm hex socket bit. I bought my 12 mm hex socket bit from AutoZone since it was local and they let me verify that I got the right bit by taking it out to my Burgman and test fitting it before buying it. And it is for a 1/2 inch drive ratchet handle which I wanted. I have adapters to use it on my 3/8 inch drive torque wrench. But you can expect to pay the massive price of somewhere between $6-$10 for it. Just slightly better than the Suzuki official tool.
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I do highly recommend getting the service manual. Authorized is best (simply 'cuz that's the right thing to do). Regardless if it even cost over $100 it will save you cash for gas if you do much of your own service and work on the Burgman. The instructions I give here are for 2013 and after models. But I don't think there's much, if any, difference with the earlier models for this job. At least not enough to be unable to figure it out using this same information.

@joe_silverburg , do find and check out @LeDude 's tutorials and YouTube videos for anything you need to work on with your 2003 model AN650.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
All I can say is WOW! Is that ever different!!!
First 3 miles on the new front tire was really a different experience. Partly due to being a new tire. But the biggest thing is going from an OLD RADIAL tire that was at end of life to a NEW BIAS PLY tire.
Bias ply tires have stiffer sidewalls than Radial tires. The very first turn out of my driveway I was taken by surprise at how much the Burgman "FELL INTO" the turn. I barely thought about turning out of the driveway or the first corner after that and the front tire just took over and pulled me around. It had a mind of its own. I have enough experience on different bikes to not loose it in such situations. I also have plenty of experience going from an old tire to new, but this was way different than I was expecting. Took at least 2-3 miles to get used to it and it still sometimes surprises me just how my Burgman now really wants to turn into any curve or turn. I've never had issues with my Burgman needing extra effort to go into a turn but the difference I was feeling with the new tire made it seem like I must have been really pushing it into curves... just the impression, not the reality. But it does now seem like I have to work to keep the front wheel from turning farther than anticipated for how much lean I am putting into it. At least the first few miles. My Burgman also seems to roll easier... getting up to speed faster or with less effort... just seems like there is less rolling resistance now. Just enough to be noticeable. I'm getting used to it now so it's becoming more natural to me. Put on another 46 miles today. My route to my son's house takes me around 4 traffic circles that I usually take at near 30 mph. Today, on the new tire, until I get it scrubbed in, I am taking those at about 25 mph just to take it a bit easy. I did notice the Shinko tire tends to follow the grooves cut in the pavement on bridges now. Don't remember if my Bridgestone tire did that when it was new but when worn it didn't. I am keeping 35 psi in the front for now. Says 33 psi on the sidewall but everywhere I read on this tire indicates the slightly higher psi should be fine. I do keep 42 psi in the rear Shinko.
 
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All I can say is WOW! Is that ever different!!!
First 3 miles on the new front tire was really a different experience. Partly due to being a new tire. But the biggest thing is going from an OLD RADIAL tire that was at end of life to a NEW BIAS PLY tire.
did you also change to a narrower profile tire? I'm wondering if that is going to make a difference in my new tire handling
 

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A Bias ply was a stiffer sidewall and it has a more pointed crown than a radial. So when you transition over in a corner they tend to steer quicker. A radial will flex and remain wider so it slows down the steering a bit.

I LIKE a fast turn in bike. Some do not.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
@mikeyMarine , No it is not a narrower profile tire. Same exact size spec as the OEM Bridgestone before it. But it is as @Dave_J stated. Being Bias ply it holds the crowned shape much more than a Radial would so it can seem to ACT like a narrower profile. If you do actually put on a narrower tire you will have a difference in handling. But I think this is better. 😁

Did I mention that it seemed like I didn't have to lean as much to turn in the same? That is part of what took me by surprise. Felt like it was taking the turn a lot more than the lean I was putting into it. Now to find out just how much tighter I can turn at speed if I lean a little more!!! 😁
After I scrub off all the new tire oils of course.
 
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From the looks of the wear on that old tire, I would check the wheel bearings and the steering head bearings (tightness). That tire wear looks like wobble wear. A bias ply tire will accentuate the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Did check wheel bearings. They are fine. I may do as many here have said they do and replace them at the next tire change. Never noticed any wobble before so maybe a check just to be sure on snugging up the steering head.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Last weekend (Wednesday through Sunday) I traveled to Wisconsin for a moto camping event with ST-Owners. There was heavy rain almost all the way there for 280 miles. The rain really didn't totally let up until Saturday afternoon so 3.5 days of mostly rainy weather resulting in very wet roads. Had a really good test of how the Shinko SR567 front tire ran in rain. I also was able to determine that the wobble or head shake I was feeling is really due to how this tire really follows every little crack, crevasse, and groove in the pavement. It is especially apparent on bridges around here where the concrete pavement is cut with wiggly rain grooves on almost every bridge. I realized the head shake was only happening while riding over these types of surfaces and not at all noticeable on smooth asphalt or concrete. I've been told that bias ply tires will exhibit this behavior much more than radials.

As to rain or wet pavement management... not so good. I noticed many times during this very rainy trip when going around turns and curves in the rain on very smooth newer concrete, smooth asphalt, and tar snakes the front tire would tend to slip. I ended up going much slower for the curves than usual. On dry pavement I didn't have this issue. But on wet pavement I had to be very careful. I let some air out to take it down to 33 psi (per the sidewall and tire fitment guide on the Shinko web site) and that improved things a little but not really a lot. The rear tire has been great so far and I have no issues what ever with the rear.

I'm a very conservative rider so I can cope with this behavior... mostly. Still, it is unnerving when not expecting it. I can still hold a fast curve around the Roundabouts (traffic circles) in the area at twice the posted recommended speeds on dry pavement. But on wet pavement I have to slow down to that recommended speed or the front tire will slip a bit. I'll likely be going back to the Bridgestone tires when these wear out in (hopefully) 7000-9000 miles.
 
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