Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
806 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2012 Burgman 650 with 29,000 miles on it. Yesterday while leaving my driveway the engine stopped. Bike was dead. As if I removed the battery. I suspected the battery connections and the main fuses all to no avail. My mechanic came by and towed it away.

The end result was a burned out rectifier. This is the first I have heard of a model 2012 having this problem. Bike is serviced regularly and ran fine up to this failure. What other surprises should I expect in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
What other surprises should I expect in the future.
If I could answer that one I'd be well psychic. If you've been on here a while you have seen some of the things. Ultimately I do not believe a 2012 is going to be any different than a '06-'11 models. Some issues with the handle bar switches usually starter button, maybe CVT belt much longer down the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
It is possible that you got the bad rectifier out the lot! Sucks, but be glad it wasn't a bad connecting rod that tore loose at 6000 RPM!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Rectifier may become bad because of high drain/overload on battery, perhaps installation of xtra light/accessory or other electrical problem.

If can replace with Mosfet system.

This perhaps help:

http://roadstercycle.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
806 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Rectifier problems

Rectifier may become bad because of high drain/overload on battery, perhaps installation of xtra light/accessory or other electrical problem.

The only drain that's extra is a GPS, radar detector and LED lights on mirrors for turn signals. I thought all of these were low drain items.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Rectifier may become bad because of high drain/overload on battery, perhaps installation of xtra light/accessory or other electrical problem.

The only drain that's extra is a GPS, radar detector and LED lights on mirrors for turn signals. I thought all of these were low drain items.
These are low drain, have battery verified as well as electrical system, perhaps something wrong there. Suzuki known for weaker rectifier, after market rectifier far better.

Even slightly weak battery can cause damage to rectifier, which why as soon as get home, bike is immediately plug in to charger maintainer. In past doing this bike battery last many many year this way and not have rectifier or other electrical problem.

Battery do not sulfate if it always fully charge.

This what I use for many year now, can often purchase for $29.99:

http://store.yuasabatteries.com/p/automatic-12v-900-ma-battery-charger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
806 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
State of battery

Even slightly weak battery can cause damage to rectifier, which why as soon as get home, bike is immediately plug in to charger maintainer. In past doing this bike battery last many many year this way and not have rectifier or other electrical problem.

I live in South Florida and ride 100 to 150 miles twice a week all year round. The bike usually starts instantly. Battery is never low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Well shoot Marv sorry that happened to you, as they say fecal matter occurs. My DL1000 toasted a stator at 22000, replaced it with an aftermarket unit and ran fine until I traded the bike in for my Burgman 650. There is no telling what took out the rectifier/ regulator, in all probability just a weak component let go in the unit. Cherie's suggestion for the aftermarket regulator/rectifier is probably the way to go as the Suzuki unit is somewhere around $220.
Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
Actually, the more electric power used during riding, the less has to be burned off as heat in the rectifier/regulator, since the alternator is always producing flat out.

When the battery is bad and/or has poor connection, it can't absorb charge so the R/R has to burn it off as heat instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
My '12 650 Burgman had the rectifier go out last winter. Extended warranty took care of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
There have been a rather significant number of '09 650's with rectifier / regulator issues. I've given some serious consideration to just proactively replacing mine instead of taking a chance of getting stranded ... but the general wisdom is to just ride and see what happens. Sorry to hear about your issue!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
There have been a rather significant number of '09 650's with rectifier / regulator issues. I've given some serious consideration to just proactively replacing mine instead of taking a chance of getting stranded ... but the general wisdom is to just ride and see what happens. Sorry to hear about your issue!
Yes, this doesn't seem to be an issue with most other bikes. One would think that in 2014 the manufacture of a foolproof reg/rec for a Burgman would be a cinch - all the operating parameters of the components involved are known, and have been known for a very long time. I would love to read any feedback from the manufacturer as to why they fail and what they decided to do about it (apart from quietly removing them out of production and saying nothing) :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Just bought a second hand Burgman 400 K9 and was wondering why the vendor supplied an extra battery ...... until I found that the rectifier/regulator was not charging the battery so after a few days, would be flat. A friendly car mechanic diagnosed that there was no charge going into the battery and so a search diagnosed the faulty part which is tucked right up inside the front leg guard (top of folks on the left of bike). I read about the recall on an internet search but when contacting Suzuki GB (UK), they denied any recall and claimed it was just for another Suzuki model bike. I needed it fixed quickly as I needed to use it and didn't have time to dismantle and replace myself. The cost was £170 for a new part and £120 for two hours labour plus the UK tax giving me a bill of over £330. NOT IMPRESSED.
Now that I've found a servicing manual on-line showing how to dismantle the various panels, I'll be doing more DIY mechanics myself. Still, I'm happy with my Burgman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
My rectifier went in my 2009 650 about 18 months ago, the display just turned off along with the engine at 50mph. Then last week would you believe I took my son's 2011 Gladius 650 to work for a run and about 2 miles from work at a junction the clocks went blank and the bike stopped. I had to be recovered and it was the rectifier, Suzuki UK said no recall in UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,787 Posts
Actually, the more electric power used during riding, the less has to be burned off as heat in the rectifier/regulator, since the alternator is always producing flat out.

When the battery is bad and/or has poor connection, it can't absorb charge so the R/R has to burn it off as heat instead.
^This is correct...

When the generator output is equal to¹ the load (including the battery's charging needs) the shunt SCRs are tuned off and no current flows through them as shown here:



Note: For clarity just one of the generator's three-phase outputs is mapped.

However when the generator's output exceeds the load that excess is shunted back to the generator stator by the SCRs--as well as feeding the load--this is the only condition where the SCRs are carrying any current and dissipating any load:



The good news is that they do not dissipate (in heat) all of excess power created by the generator (most of it just "recirculates", doing no work). What does get turned to heat is due to the SCR's "ON" resistance (in the order of 0.1 Ω), and its inherent voltage drop ("across" the SCR) being 1.5 V or so.

This means each device is dissipating just 22.5 W--about the same as a small lamp or low-power soldering iron. Properly "heat-sinked" this is not a problem.

Note that in addition to the three SCRs there are six other diodes in the typical rectifier/regulator--they do each carry their share of the full output/load and failure of any one of them will also kill the unit. Like any solid state device heat is their mortal enemy, vibration does not help them out either...


-----------------------------------
¹ - When the generator output is less than the load the battery makes up the difference, the shunt SCRs are OFF.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
My '09 burnt out in the middle of Scotland this Summer, while on a camping trip wiith the wife on the 1055 Speed Triple (what a bike!!).
Not good.
A known manfacturing fault for sure, and followed up by the UKs legendary customer service ethics.
Which means I pay.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top