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During the process of installing the bungee hooks on the pillion handles, I took some pictures of the Type S rear spoiler removed. Surprisingly, the spoiler is made of metal and very heavy. I was expecting it be plastic like the rest of the body work.

http://burgmanusa.com/gallery/Bungee_Hooks

The wiring for the LED brake light is really simple and the plug is just spliced into the the stock brake wiring. It looks like any one could install the spoiler on their 400. I took this as a little practice and look-see in preparation of installing the Type S back rest they have available in Japan.

BTW, a question about torque....

I got a set of Japanese and English instructions. The Japanese instructions show disassembly of the Type S spoiler, while the English showed removal of the non-Type S passenger back rest. I don't read Japanese, but it looks like from the figures they show, that the different bolts should be re-torqued to different amounts. The English instructions just say everything should be tightened to 10 NM.

Finally, my question:

How strong is 10 NM (7.2 ft-lb)?

I bought a micro-adjusting torque wrench specifically for that range 0-21 NM, but it said at small settings, you may not hear the wrench "click." I set it at 9.9 NM and started to tighten it but could not hear any "click" or feel any give even though I used a lot of force. When I loosened the bolts again, they seemed much tighter than when I first loosened them. I wouldn't think that 10 NM required that much force. I returned the torque wrench because it was useless to me.

Anyway, I'm planning on buying another one, this time a Craftsman, just like the big one I have for my cars. I'm hoping that it will have an audible click. I was going to stay away from the cheap torque wrenches with the scales, but would it be better in this sort of application?
 

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Finally, my question:

How strong is 10 NM (7.2 ft-lb)?
1. Not very much at all to be honest. Imagine a wrench 1 foot in length and then the rotational force imparted if you hung a 7lb weight on the end.

2. Have gone off torque wrenches since my last use succeeded in shearing a bolt on the cylinder head of the 400 - which I had to drill out - :shock:

3. Heard this advice once - tighten until the bolt shears and remember that force, then next time do it the same less about half a turn! :p
 

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i think your on target norm.
friggin nano meters...
sigh - yeah man - when using torque wrenches i like the click type. those little dudes can be fussy tho.
 

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Yup, torque wrenches can be sensitive. Remember to relax the sping setting when finished using it before it gets put away. A previous employer had to send their torque wrenches out annually for calibration to qualify for government inspection. Along came a military contract calling for a small torque setting with such tight toleronces -0+1/2% that I had to design it and submit it to a third party calibration firm. It's as NormanB says: an amount of weight hanging from the end of a wrench, held horizontal, a fixed distance from the center of the bolt.
 
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