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I'm just wondering why can Suzuki (or any other companies) make a motorcycle/scooter that can be easily maintained. When you have to start taking apart panelling and such just to get at the engine it seems like it's non-user friendly. It's like me buying a car and having to remove the side panels just to get at the engine.

Can't a motorcycle company build a scooter that has one latch to open up hinged panels that could make it very easy to use for their customers.

I don't own a Burgman yet, but there's the maintenance factor that's really got me thinking about it. Dealers are a rip off when you can do basic maintenance by yourself. But when it's not as easy as it could be - it ticks me off.

Anyone feel the same way?

Silver
 

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You might be able to lift the hood on most new cars, to chage oil and coolant...but...

Nothing beyond that is easy to get to.

Ditto modern bikes...STX, Wing, most beemers...Harleys are an exception, still easy.
 

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abm said:
Harleys are an exception, still easy.
This is one good thing to be said for 1950's technology (which the Harley is still closely modeled after).

The down side was that you were doing maintenance much more frequently.

Anybody else ever look at those ads for the Royal Enfield Bullet? Now there is a beautiful 1955 machine you can still buy new today! I'd love to have one in my garage. (Don't know if I'd ever ride it... but I could sit and look at it for hours...)
http://www.enfieldmotorcycles.com/mdl_deluxe.html

Bottom line: the simple naked standard motorcycle hasn't sold well for years (cruisers are the exception). People buy sport and touring bikes with bodywork & high tech features. Also, the industry would rather you didn't maintain your own machine. They make a lot more money on service than on the initial sale of the bike. They have no motivation to design a machine for owner friendly maintenance.
 

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I'd have to say the new HD twinCam is a good a modern engine as any out there. hte FI has been sorted, as has the ignition. Its very good, and easier to service than all the Jap bikes out there.

THe Burgman is a nightmare, not so much from a periodic maintenance standpoint, but from a systems failure perspective. Just look in the service manual under, "CVT failure codes". It will scare the crap out of you.
 

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Guys,
The Burgman 400 is not that hard to service. Two screws and a clip remove the seat, two screws remove the front hump cover and push pin fasteners remove the bottom cover. That's all you need to remove to get to the engine. It's easier than fishing under a gas tank and finding all the hoses and connectors on a regular bike.
I'll admit working on a scooter was a little different from a regular motorcycle but now that I've done my first service I find the Burgman is fairly easy to work on. The diagnostic codes make component repairs easy. It's just a new way to do things, more like a car but it's all built in so it's a snap to find problems. I even keep the dealer code switch under the seat in case I get stuck on the road. It will pin point the problem so you won't don't have to figure it out by yourself.

Thanx
Russ
 

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I'd have to say the new HD twinCam is a good a modern engine as any out there. hte FI has been sorted, as has the ignition. Its very good, and easier to service than all the Jap bikes out there.

THe Burgman is a nightmare, not so much from a periodic maintenance standpoint, but from a systems failure perspective. Just look in the service manual under, "CVT failure codes". It will scare the crap out of you.
"Jap"?&nbsp It is indeed intriguing that someone who wishes to appear erudite by quoting Gurdjieff would use such a term.&nbsp I would be interested in knowing how you refer to Malagutis, Ducatis or Piaggios.
 

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The Burgman 400 is not that hard to service. Two screws and a clip remove the seat,
You forgot the Elect. light with out a plug and soldered terminals that runs on the surface except for one spot were it goes through a hole, so take off the under seat plastic or cut the wires -not easy, at least the first time, I put a plug in.:)
And lets not forget how hard the 2 screws are to get out unless you take out the plastic cover and it helps to have a friend hold the seat.:wink:
 

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taniwaki said:
abm said:
I'd have to say the new HD twinCam is a good a modern engine as any out there. hte FI has been sorted, as has the ignition. Its very good, and easier to service than all the Jap bikes out there.

THe Burgman is a nightmare, not so much from a periodic maintenance standpoint, but from a systems failure perspective. Just look in the service manual under, "CVT failure codes". It will scare the crap out of you.
"Jap"? It is indeed intriguing that someone who wishes to appear erudite by quoting Gurdjieff would use such a term. I would be interested in knowing how you refer to Malagutis, Ducatis or Piaggios.
I dont appear erudite, I am erudite. And you are right, Jap is not a nice term. I was more a contraction than a slur, but inexcuseable nonetheless.
 

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I guess it's all how you look at it. I just did the 600 mile service on my brother's 650. Took me 30 minutes. Changing plugs on my T/A, however requires special tools and a lift. The back two are shrouded by the firewall so I have to get them from under the car.
 

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Paul, the sportsbike may outsell the naked in North America, but it is the absolute first choice for motorcyclists in Japan. I'd say that the sportsbike comes fourth or fifth on the list, after big-scooters, cruisers, and possibly rally touring/off-road/tourers. Afterall, on anything but the smoothest circuit, at road speeds below 110mph a well ridden naked with a full system (output of around 120bhp at the rear wheel or more) will be easily as fast or as fast as a full blown race rep. An upright position allowing clear visibility of the road ahead and good manouverability combined with huge torque count for more than people think. All the commited nutter ride nakeds here. Race reps are usually things that people potter about on.

To feed this interest, you can still buy new GPZ900s and Katanas in Japan, and arguably the CB1300, GSX1400, ZRX1200 and XJR1300 are single market machines, developed to feed the same interest. How different the world can be on opposing sides of the pond...
 

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I couldn't agree more. Why didn't they make the valves hydraulic? My Yamaha Riva had them and I never had a problem. I blame computer aided design (CAD) for the crankcase breather being so damned fiddly to get back on. I had to fiddle and fart around for a good hour before I got that stupid little hose back on. Even though the design allows for compactness...fitting the air box and other pieces to minimize the physical space, makes for a difficult refit and general maintenance.

As for dealerships, I don't trust any of them. Funny that my Suzuki booklet seemed to imply that I MUST TAKE IT TO A CERTIFIED SUZUKI CENTER in order to maintain the warranty. Well firstly, I don't considered some of the young, casual, backyard highschool summer employees that these dealership hire as CERTIFIED in Suzuki products. This is a very tough industry because it's seasonable (at least here in Canada), very competitive and not for the faint at heart if chosen as a career. BTW warranty laws are very clear, you can maintain your very own motor vehicle and still get a warranty don't let a dealership intimidate you into thinking otherwise ...thats the way it is here in Canada.
 

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Randy,

The connector for the seat light is under the front hump cover....dare I say just two screws? I agree it is easier to remove the seat with the help of a second person.

Thanx
Russ
 

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Russ
I got lost somewhere. :?
under the front hump cover ? Do you mean the plastic attached to the bottom of the seat pan. or the hump were the gas tank is. I guess the gas tank hump)
Any rate I cut the wire and pulled it out -one end is at the light and the terminals are soldered the other end dips down under the front of the seat under the plastic (which I removed) and then disappears.
I could not see a plug
(of course knowing my self that does not mean much). :)
 

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I took the time to clean, detail, and do some basic maintenance on both of my Suzukis this week. The Burgman won some & lost some compared to the V-Strom.

The air cleaner filter on the AN650 was easy to remove and inspect. It was also pretty clean after 6500 miles. On the V-Strom, you have to remove some small body panels around the gas tank, jack up the back end of the gas tank to get access to disconnect the fuel line (putting a rag under it to catch the teaspoonful or so of gasoline that will leak out). Disconnect an electrical plug, then unbolt the front of the gas tank, and remove the 5.8 gallon tank from the motorcycle. At that point you can remove the eight bolts from the air cleaner cover to access the filter. Since my tank was full of gas, that's 36 lbs plus the weight of the tank, which you must lift from standing to one side of a decidedly tall motorcycle. I decided to skip that inspection on the V-Strom. Hopefully I don't have a bee colony or family of Gerbils living in there...

There was no chain lube flyoff to clean up off of the Burgman's rear wheel and swingarm. Better yet, there was no drivechain to adjust, clean, and lube!

I checked the CVT Filter on the Burgman. Pain in the neck. After removing the lower leg shield, the hardest part was dealing with removal of the four 7mm hex head bolts that secure the filter cover. Not much room to get at the top ones with my small box end wrench. A lot of cramped-space finger twisting to finish bolt removal once they were loosened. More of same on re-installation. I'll go buy a small socket with a screwdriver type drive before I attempt that again. And the reward for all that effort was to find that my CVT filter was pretty clean. I can see where it would get dirty pretty fast if you rode on dirt or dusty gravel roads though, because of it's location.

While I was laying on the garage floor trying to get the bolts out of the CVT filter cover, I discovered why my centerstand has been sticking. Duh... The Remus exhaust cannister does not use the forward hangar that the stock exhaust uses. The stock bolt is not threaded for about 2 inches, because the hangar is real wide - so you can't reinstall the bolt and tighten it down. I had thrown it in my scrap parts cupboard. I now saw that the missing exhaust hangar bolt is also a support point for the centerstand... So I made a trip to the hardware store, found a suitable bolt, and installed it.

The bottom line is that despite being fully enclosed in bodywork, the Burgman is not universally harder to maintain than the V-Strom (which at a quick glance appears to be a fairly naked motorcycle).
 

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tires on a goldwing

Try changing the rear tire on a 1500 goldwing. It's at least a 4 hour job and your lucky if you have no parts left over. I was so frustated I feel like selling it before the next tire change. Of course I could let the dealer do it for $425.00.

Dave
 

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Re: tires on a goldwing

cuda said:
Try changing the rear tire on a 1500 goldwing. It's at least a 4 hour job and your lucky if you have no parts left over. I was so frustated I feel like selling it before the next tire change. Of course I could let the dealer do it for $425.00.

Dave
I remember changing the rear on my old yam 650 on the side of the road with a pair of tire irons, took about 1.5 hr. and dusted knuckles.

you are right, modern large bikes with tubless rims require a flat bed wrecker if you are stuck with a flat on the road - or a good plug kit - but practice first on a dud tire.
 
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