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I just got back from The House of Motorcycles who quoted me $448.00 to replace my belt. That seems high to me, maybe not, any suggestions on how I can do it cheaper.

Parts: $196.95
Labor: $237.50 (2.5 hrs)

Thanks for your input.
 

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It's not that hard to do plenty of videos out there. Scooter West has the belt for $129.00
 

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How many miles on your 08. Are you the first owner?
 

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The parts costs are full retail, that's just the way it is at many/most dealerships.

2.5 hours labor strikes me as about right IF the variator is to be disassembled and cleaned, and the driven pulley assembly fully inspected. Which BTW, at 31k miles, means you may find them telling you that you need a bearing/seal or two--and perhaps a clutch.

As to the cost of the labor, around $90/h, that's the going cost here as well (1/2 hour minimum)--and the price of not doing it yourself...
 

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I sure hope when the time comes - I can do it myself or with help of friends.

Gave that (do it yourself) a lot of consideration when buying the 400 as all indications are it is standard maintenace to be replacing stuff (belts of course, but clutch, other stuff at regular intervals on the 400). GROAN

Hopefully, another option would be to get it down to the point of case off, and haul it to the shop to finish the job (surely, that would cut labor costs).
 

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From my perspective, the hardest thing would be torquing the main nuts back. You need the tool micBergsma made. Anyone with a 4" angle grinder and a wire welder (and some scrap metal) could make one -it's what I'm going to do.
BTW- for the money you'd save doing it yourself, you could by a cheap wire welder and angle grinder and still take your significant other out to eat. Then, you have a happy wife and two new tools!
 

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You can also buy a HF 1/2" drive electric impact wrench ($50 often on sale for $40)
This is the sort of tool which you don't need very often, but when you do it'll take a job that's simply impossible and turn it into 5 seconds worth of work. Nice balance and easy to use. Do yourself a favor and spend the twenty bucks on a set of metric impact sockets - they'll keep you from ruining your regular sockets.

It's not SnapOn quality, but I don't use it but a half dozen times a year rather than all day every day.
 

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It is actually pretty good, I have had mine for over 15 years and on more than one occasion had it so hot you could no longer hold it in your hand--replaced the switch once five years or so ago--$5.00 shipped from HF.

It's a clone of an old Black & Decker Industrial model from the late 70's:

 

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Great ideas men...one added note. I'd slip some thread lock on those bolts just because They have a reputation of working loose on this vehicle.
 

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I was wondering why that extension was colored green. I've never even heard of that method of controlling torque. Today I learned!
 

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Torque sticks, and hw they work, are at first glance a bit of an enigma; the best analogy that most people can relate to is the instance of trying to bang a nail into a cantilever supported (overhanging) board.

Many of us have had the experience of trying to pound a nail into a poorly supported board, and reached the point where it does not matter how hard you hit the nail it will not go in any further. This is because the "springyness" of the board is absorbing all the energy and none is being delivered to the nail--torque sticks work the same way, but in a rotational (torque) manner.

What looks like a plain ol' socket extension is actually a specifically sized torque spring (this is why they have different body diameters) that at its design torque absorbs all the applied load in excess of its rating--bang on it (with an impact wrench) all you want, it will not deliver any more than its rated torque to the fastener. Astoundingly simple and entirely accurate until it deforms or breaks, both quite noticable and rare failures...
 

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Great explanation cliff...and never use one to undo a fastner, it's not an extention but I have seen a few people try to use it that way. You can use it in anticlockwise direction if you have the bolts loosened, just want to use it for convenience of length.
 

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The torque sticks must rely on some industry standard for number of blows per revolution of the impact wrench?

Just for argues sake, let's say we have an impact wrench that does 3 strikes per revolution versus one that does 6 strikes per revolution.
The former would be able to twist the torque stick further than the latter, thereby applying more torque
 

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The torque sticks must rely on some industry standard for number of blows per revolution of the impact wrench?

Just for argues sake, let's say we have an impact wrench that does 3 strikes per revolution versus one that does 6 strikes per revolution.
The former would be able to twist the torque stick further than the latter, thereby applying more torque
It doesn't matter, just as in my "nail banging" analogy it does not matter how many times you bang the nail--or for that matter how big a hammer you use--it will only go in so far.

However in real life you would not want to just let the impact wrench bang away for several minutes; watch the socket/nut and when it stops turning you are done...
 
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