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My neighbor’s boy is 7 years old. He is always asking questions about stuff. He thinks because I work with the military that I somehow have the answers to everything. :roll: Most of the time I’m able to come up with satisfactory answers. This time I was stumped. The simple question is: “How do they peel baby carrots at the carrot factory?” :shock: We both figure its some sort of machine but don’t quite know the exact method of the peeling. Internet didn’t help either. Since BurgmanUSA attracts all sorts of walks of life I deceided to place the question here.
:D -Bryan
 

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Ah, this is an EASY one. Rabbits.

Lots of Rabbits at the Carrot factory. The nibble the outer coating off and that part is what you see at salad bar's.

At least that's what my Dad always told me.

Of course, he said "Magic" is how vacuum cleaners work. That's just absurd. Everyone knows that they package Black Holes in vacuum cleaners to provide the suction force.
 

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Surprisingly, the answer to that is the same as the answer to, "How does the chick get inside the shell to begin with"?

A: I don't know.

(It's a correct answer, too. Because I really don't.)

:)
 

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I'm home on drugs recovering from surgery, so if I type stupid forgive me.

Anyway, they are put in a machine that actually spins/rotates, and the machine has a gritty type surface, so the carrots actually worn down and not actually peeled.

I used one when I was a cook in college. used for potatos as well etc.
 

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Warren you are right that is why each one is the same size and shape.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I knew you guys would come through! Wow. I guess we have our very own think tank.
Thank you guys,
-Bryan
 

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Greengoose said:
I guess we have our very own think tank.
Now we just need to figure out how harness it for profit so we can spend more time riding. :D
 

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I did some camping a few years ago. Little boy from the next campsite was really a likeable kid - except that he questioned EVERYTHING. He favorite word was "Why?". And the most frustrating thing was trying to come up with good answers.

I first met my step grandaughter when she was about 8 years old. Her very first interaction with me was: "So, grandpa Paul, tell me what you are really really really good at". :shock:

Hanging around with an inquisitive kid for a couple of hours, can be an awesome challenge. :wink:
 

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pauljo said:
I did some camping a few years ago. Little boy from the next campsite was really a likeable kid - except that he questioned EVERYTHING. He favorite word was "Why?". And the most frustrating thing was trying to come up with good answers.

I first met my step grandaughter when she was about 8 years old. Her very first interaction with me was: "So, grandpa Paul, tell me what you are really really really good at". :shock:

Hanging around with an inquisitive kid for a couple of hours, can be an awesome challenge. :wink:
Come up with anything yet! :lol:
 

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NormanB said:
pauljo said:
I first met my step grandaughter when she was about 8 years old. Her very first interaction with me was: "So, grandpa Paul, tell me what you are really really really good at". :shock:
Come up with anything yet! :lol:
Nope! Gave up. :) It's that 3rd "really" that I can't get past. :wink:
 

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pauljo said:
"So, grandpa Paul, tell me what you are really really really good at". :shock:
Let's see...

Watching television
Sleeping in
Procrastinating
Eating

I have lot's of them... :wink:
 

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pauljo said:
I first met my step grandaughter when she was about 8 years old. Her very first interaction with me was: "So, grandpa Paul, tell me what you are really really really good at". :shock:
How about being really good at riding the Burgman? Why not show her!
 

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good at

i'm not good at anything,so i guess i'm good for nothing.
 

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pauljo said:
Nope! Gave up. :) It's that 3rd "really" that I can't get past. :wink:
With (currently) 2340, I'd say you good at posting on the BurgmanUSA forums. :p
 

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billmeek said:
pauljo said:
Nope! Gave up. :) It's that 3rd "really" that I can't get past. :wink:
With (currently) 2340, I'd say you good at posting on the BurgmanUSA forums. :p
....well prolific anyway :wink: :lol:
 

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billmeek said:
Greengoose said:
I guess we have our very own think tank.
Now we just need to figure out how harness it for profit so we can spend more time riding. :D
It hasn't worked for Mensa. :) :wink:

Steve
 

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wasions said:
billmeek said:
Greengoose said:
I guess we have our very own think tank.
Now we just need to figure out how harness it for profit so we can spend more time riding. :D
It hasn't worked for Mensa. :) :wink:

Steve
Even IBM doesn't have a "think tank" anymore and they started it (along with the terminology) decades ago! At least I think it was IBM... if it wasn't it may have been Xerox.
 

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Microsoft? They may call it something else these days - and with "lean and mean" staffing the "think tank" folks are undoubtably pulling double or triple duty. But innovative thinking is still encouraged at many major companies.
 

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pauljo said:
Microsoft? They may call it something else these days - and with "lean and mean" staffing the "think tank" folks are undoubtably pulling double or triple duty. But innovative thinking is still encouraged at many major companies.
I used to work as a software engineer at many companies (over 20 years worth) before I quit the field alltogether and changed careers mid-life. During my tenure as senior software engineer (aka 'computer programmer'), the smaller companies encouraged individual and imaginative thinking. The larger the company, the more they demanded that you do "what you're paid for". Naturally, I liked the smaller companies better. But toward the end, even the smaller companies started accepting individuality less and less because they were being governed by much larger entities that purchased smaller companies to add to their portfolio.
 
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