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Discussion Starter #1
I have had from new my AN400K4 and over the last 4 years (around 50K) I have had intermittent ignition sw. problems
The m/c agent came to the conclusion after an expensive ECU/FI analysis that it was either the ECU or the ign. sw. The former I replaced which made no difference and $900 poorer, so decided to make mods to the OEM sw. By adding a toggle sw. to the red-orange leads, main light circuit.
This meant I had to turn on the toggle sw first before turning on the ign. sw. This worked well up until this year when every thing went dead.

I thought I would be smart and bypass the whole OEM switch assy., which meant adding a 3 pole switch.
It blew plenty of fuses and didn't work... So back to the drawing board.
Having priced up a new sw. assy, I decided to remove and strip the original switch and lock assy to source the problem.
This is where I came across a 1K ohm resistor moulded within the switch body. There is no mention of this component in the workshop manual or master circuit.
The original switch has 3 poles; red-orange input wires supply the lights, relays and dials, the o/y- b/w wires go to the ECU. The 3rd pole goes to the small lamps.
The second pole to the ECU is designed to work in 2 stages. 1st stage goes thru a resistor, the second is full on bypassing the resistance...

My question is what does this resistance do?? ( no mention of it in the workshop manual ).

Does it reduce 12v spikes, act as a momentary delay, or a hidden secret only SUZUKI know about.?? What ever it does, it works -- mine doesn't .

The switch problem when inspected, was partially caused by heat build up on the "swipe plate" which melted the plastic base holding the 3 base terminals.
The whole switch is delicate and flimsy, which was why I wanted to replace it, but with the resistance gizmo has made it very difficult to replicate using more robust switches.

The OEM switch can be removed from the lock assy by 2 screws and easily worked on.. So why do SUZUKI charge a fortune for a whole steering/lock assy. Simple..., because they can.
It's the usual modern day parts con!! DOLLARS.
By adding electronic components only Suzuki are aware of supposedly helps eliminate the smart arse home mechanic!!

At this stage of the bikes life and high mileage, it could be a case of repair or recycle.. I'm hanging out for the former.

Any ideas out there!! johnD
 

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The big question in my mind is that if faced with a choice of two possible causes, one is a $300-$400 item, and one is a $900 item, and no guarantee of which is really at fault, why elect to replace the more expensive item first?

Then, when this didn't work, try to do a work-around on the less expensive item.
If you're going to do the work-around, why not try it before replacing either?

I guess I'm just not seeing the logic in this.

I have replaced the ignition switch module on my 2006, and if I remember correctly it cost me $340, or so.

Please bear in mind that the replacement Keyswitch unit does not only contain the ignition switch barrel, but also the surround with magnetic closure, as well as a replacement glovebox lock, and locking fuel cap, to allow you to maintain the same lock in all areas.
Mine also came withthe special tool needed to fit/remove, as well as two factory keys (coded to the magnetic latch, and two extra key bosses coded to the latch, to allow me to have another couple of generic spares cut & inserted to the bosses, and retain full functionality.
So it's not as simple as Suzuki charging a fortune because they can, which they do on every part anyway, same as any other OEM. Because for many manufactures, that's where they make money, the main equipment is break-even or loss making. But all the locks get replaced, not just the ignition.

Having said all of that, I may have my old set of locks, which I would be glad to send you for the cost of shipping, but please bear in mind the following:
1) There is only one, non-original key for these (which is why I replaced them), but you may be able to strip parts you need to rebuild your originals.
2) Bearing in mind International shipping costs, it may prove no more inexpensive than buying a replacement.
But the offer stands, and they are yours if you want them.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
finding out the hard way!!

You mentioned about the elimination process as a way of correcting a problem.. In my case the ECU/bike had been involved in a heavy crash. The ECU unit was ripped from its mounting, thrown meters down the road and suffered case damage. It still worked when refitted back on the bike but after a month of use that's when the electrical faults occurred and my immediate assumption was that the ECU had an internal fault.
The ignition switch was tested at that time and worked OK. So what does one do.???

With a new ECU and a bypass mod to the head light switch to help ease the arcing on the ign sw, it was back on the road. All had gone well for the last 60Ks, since the crash, that's until last week..

Why doesn't a 3 pole sw. work in place of the OEM sw. All to do with security!!
 

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The resistor is there to prevent someone from just jumping around the switch to hotwire the bike. Bike won't start without the resistor in the circuit. Would be easy enough to just wire another 1K if you can figure out what portion of the circuit it has to go to. It's been mentioned on this site before.
 
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