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I see nothing on this forum about powder coated wheels , I read complaints about keeping the original wheels clean and looking nice , but nothing about powder coating . Also I see a lot of white Burgmans with wheels that are just begging to be powder coated a bright white . I personally never liked white bikes , but I have to admit I’ve seen some pretty nice looking ones that had the wheels powder coated white , or another bright color that matched another color on the bike . What I want to know is has any one tried powder coating a set ? If so what was the experience ? Good bad or indifferent ? While I’m not complaining about the looks of a 650 , some times it looks like a large parade float with tiny little wheels . I think making the wheels stand out would help the 650 look more proportionate . Powder coating would certainly make it easier to keep them clean , or at least I think it would ?

TheReaper!
 

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I tend to look at the bugs and the dirt to sort the posers from the riders ;)

After the The James Bay Road ride



Mind you the idea of white wheels is intriguing.
 

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I tend to look at the bugs and the dirt to sort the posers from the riders ;)
.
Funny. I don't really care what the bike looks like, just that it's been ridden. A few scars, bugs, scratches and such says "this is a bike that has been used for its intended purpose". Instant respect for those machines with some battle scars on them.
 

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While the powder coating might make for some nice looking wheels I don't think it will help keep them cleaner. Powder coating is just a method of applying paint without having any liquid solvents involved. The wheels are already painted so I don't see how powder coating will make them any easier to keep clean. Brake dust is still going to get all over them.

I've also seen claims that the heat curing process for powder coating can weaken some wheels. Whether or not there is any truth to that I don't know.
 

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I strongly disagree with Buffalo, and I base that on actually getting my own wheels powder coated.

I had my rims powdercoated, and it's a joy to clean them now, since the thick layer completely smooths out the purposely rough parts of the rims.

I have started to use CillitBang Lime and Grime which does an excellent job of getting rid of brake dust and contains very efficient wetting agents, that makes the dirt rinse much easier off.

You have to remove the bearings, otherwise the grease will melt and ruin everything during the powder curing process.
The bearings can't be removed without damaging them.

Each and every thread, bore and mating surface has to be effectively masked off prior to powder coating, or you will have to spend hours grinding off unwanted powder coating. The masking tape my coater used was not sufficient where the brake discs attach, so I had to take the wheels to a machine shop to have the mating surfaces ground down to base metal.
The next time I will make some dummy brake disc centers to bolt on during coating.
NEVER EVER use a regular thread tap to clean out powder coating from threaded holes, the powder coating sticks together and the risk of breaking the tap is near 100%, and then you will have to pay $$$ for spark eroding the broken tap.
 

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I haven't powder coated the wheels on my Burgman yet, but I have done it on sport bikes I own with much success. My experience is much like ErikDK's post above, the final finish is much slicker than stock and has more shine. The end result are wheels that look better when clean and are much easier to clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I strongly disagree with Buffalo, and I base that on actually getting my own wheels powder coated.

I had my rims powdercoated, and it's a joy to clean them now, since the thick layer completely smooths out the purposely rough parts of the rims.

I have started to use CillitBang Lime and Grime which does an excellent job of getting rid of brake dust and contains very efficient wetting agents, that makes the dirt rinse much easier off.

You have to remove the bearings, otherwise the grease will melt and ruin everything during the powder curing process.
The bearings can't be removed without damaging them.

Each and every thread, bore and mating surface has to be effectively masked off prior to powder coating, or you will have to spend hours grinding off unwanted powder coating. The masking tape my coater used was not sufficient where the brake discs attach, so I had to take the wheels to a machine shop to have the mating surfaces ground down to base metal.
The next time I will make some dummy brake disc centers to bolt on during coating.
NEVER EVER use a regular thread tap to clean out powder coating from threaded holes, the powder coating sticks together and the risk of breaking the tap is near 100%, and then you will have to pay $$$ for spark eroding the broken tap.
What do you mean when you say "dummy brake disc centers" ? When I've had things powder coated in the past I just put bolts in the bolt holes and never had a problem with threads .

TheReaper!
 

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What do you mean when you say "dummy brake disc centers" ? When I've had things powder coated in the past I just put bolts in the bolt holes and never had a problem with threads .

TheReaper!
The brake disks won't go back on the wheels if there's powder coating on the mating surfaces, both the flat part and the center stud, which the brake disk centering hole fits around.

Powder coat is MUCH thicker than paint.

ITYBIKFPE

I Tell You Because I Know From Personal Experience

I find that much better than the saying DAMHIK
 

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Each and every thread, bore and mating surface has to be effectively masked off prior to powder coating, or you will have to spend hours grinding off unwanted powder coating. The masking tape my coater used was not sufficient where the brake discs attach, so I had to take the wheels to a machine shop to have the mating surfaces ground down to base metal.
The next time I will make some dummy brake disc centers to bolt on during coating.
NEVER EVER use a regular thread tap to clean out powder coating from threaded holes, the powder coating sticks together and the risk of breaking the tap is near 100%, and then you will have to pay $$$ for spark eroding the broken tap.
Erik what if you screw in throw away bolt or Allen screw in disk hole and remove bolts after powder coat cure.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The brake disks won't go back on the wheels if there's powder coating on the mating surfaces, both the flat part and the center stud, which the brake disk centering hole fits around.

Powder coat is MUCH thicker than paint.

ITYBIKFPE

I Tell You Because I Know From Personal Experience

I find that much better than the saying DAMHIK
I've seen some real some real nightmare situations with getting PC off even on TV with so called professional motorcycle builders . So I know very well what you are talking about and appreciate no end the warnings . When you did your wheels did you go with the silver color or ?

TheReaper!
 

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Erik what if you screw in throw away bolt or Allen screw in disk hole and remove bolts after powder coat cure.
This is from a BMW, but it shows how the brake disk is centered and lies on the threaded "outriggers".
If there is powder coating on these surfaces, you can't install the brake disk properly.
On an ABS-equipped bike, the resulting offset from the powder coating will make the toner ring touch the ABS sensor.

 

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Powdercoating

I have an 06 650 , i will be powder coating my wheels very soon,but i'm going with a mat or possibly a gloss black.
 

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Make the powder coater match the color of brake dust, then you'll never need to clean the wheels again.

I strongly urge you to - figuratively speaking - leave the centers of the brake disks mounted on the wheels during the coating process, since any trace of powder coating where the brake disks meet the wheel will make it impossible to put the disks back on.

Take the wheel and brake disks to the coater and show him how they mount up, so he can mask accordingly.

All threads must have a bolt screwed in, or you'll not get one in afterwards, don't trust the coater's plugs.

As for the bearings, the next time around I will leave them in, but wash them throughly with brake cleaner, because any trace of grease will seep out and run the powder coating during the oven curing.

By leaving the bearings in, any powder coating overflow will be knocked off when you drive out the bearings before installing new, top-quality bearings for the rest of the scooter's life.
 

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I am not going to repaint my wheels, but thank you, Erik and The Reaper for all the very useful information on the pros and cons of doing so.
 

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I think it is very worthwhile having your wheels painted because the Suzuki paint scheme is unfit for purpose. I am not wholly convinced that powder coating is either necessary or confers advantage when compared to a standard paint process. Erik's advice on avoiding the difficulties that can arise from powder coating is most helpful for those considering going down the route.

When (not IF) I do the wheels on my current Lardy, I am going to spend my time preparing the wheels for the paint process, something I did not do last time. My efforts will concentrate on grinding and polishing those areas of the forging that are surface rough. I was perfectly happy with the last paint job - just wanting to 'improve' even marginally.;)
 

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I find all this talk of painting and powder coating fascinating. I don't understand the guys that own Harleys either, all that washing and shining. My motorcycles are tools, they do get cleaned a couple of times a year but show bikes they are not. I do keep them up mechanically though.
 

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It's not for show, it's because the wheels will corrode badly when the poor OEM paint peels off.

If you don't live in a rust-prone climate, you have no idea how bad it is.
 

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Illusion Orange Powder Coated Rims and Calipers

On the topic of powder coating since the suzuki .....ahemm.....paint, decided to not hold up to the elements I pulled them off and took them to a local shop here in the city. But since I'm going all out this time and keeping this ride for the foreseeable future and just updating the mechanical for newer adaptations decided to go with something noticeable. So the results in Illusion orange powder coat sourced from prismatic colors.

Front wheel, no discs 20150617_180503.jpg

Front wheel, other side 20150617_172016.jpg

One of the front brake calipers 20150617_180602.jpg

Rear caliper 20150617_171859.jpg

Rear wheel with new EBC stainless rotor 20150618_063622.jpg

Front with new 2015 floating rotors 20150618_063750.jpg

If you noticed in the pic above of the calipers they forgot so kindly to mask off my parking brake actuator and mating surface surrounding it, same for the arm that mounts to that too and all the surfaces for the banjo fittings. Way to go guys.....

Thankfully though having a garage with tools helps so clearing off the powder coat on these areas didn't prove that challenging but it's something to keep in mind to make sure that the shop doing the work has a clear understanding of what DOESN'T get coated. Even after going over it with them at the drop off, a good reminder helps.

Other things being done to compliment the look is I have my abs sensor rings out being chrome plated since as I discovered are just a rough plated steel that attempts to polish to a mirror finish doesn't work well unless they were machined stainless. And when I can afford to I'll switch out the mounting hardware for the discs to either an anodized gold or orange aluminum or titanium.
 

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I wonder why the 650 wheels are more prone to dodgy paint/corrosion?

My 400 special edition has the same colour wheels as the 650 and I was mildly concerned that they would suffer the same fate but they have stayed in excellent condition.
(Even though I ride all through the British winter when they put lots of salt on the road)
 
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