Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have almost made the decision to buy a 650 :)
I have a few of remaining questions for 650 owners.

1) I notice the mirrors are located low down, what is the rear view like?

2) I may have to use the 650 in wet conditions (I live in the UK!) I used to own a burgman 400 and that was fine in the wet, I am just wondering what effect the extra 54kg (119 lb) has on the handling, I do hope to buy the ABS model so that might help.

3) What is a comfortable cruising speed (on a private road of course :) ) With the 400 burgman, an indicated 75mph was about the most, it would do more but would start to sound strained.

4) The weight difference over the 400 is approx. 54kg (119 lb) I have had a few large cc bikes SV1000, GSXR-1000 but these are quite light in comparision. Do I need to start pumping iron :lol: , or is the weight low down and makes the bike easy to handle?

Thanks in advance

Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Normsthename said:
I have almost made the decision to buy a 650 :)
I have a few of remaining questions for 650 owners.

1) I notice the mirrors are located low down, what is the rear view like?

2) I may have to use the 650 in wet conditions (I live in the UK!) I used to own a burgman 400 and that was fine in the wet, I am just wondering what effect the extra 54kg (119 lb) has on the handling, I do hope to buy the ABS model so that might help.

3) What is a comfortable cruising speed (on a private road of course :) ) With the 400 burgman, an indicated 75mph was about the most, it would do more but would start to sound strained.

4) The weight difference over the 400 is approx. 54kg (119 lb) I have had a few large cc bikes SV1000, GSXR-1000 but these are quite light in comparision. Do I need to start pumping iron :lol: , or is the weight low down and makes the bike easy to handle?

Thanks in advance

Andy
1) The mirrors are excellent. The best I've ever had on a motorcycle. Nice and big, clear image, and they hold their adjustment. I'm tall, 6'6", but I adapted quickly to glancing downward to see the mirrors.

2) The 650 is heavier than the 400, but it also has those nice big fat radial tires... And, in every comparison test I've read, the 650 is the best handling super scooter.

3) The 650 cruises effortlessly at 85 mph, and will still accellerate to pass. It gets "strained" over 100 mph.

4) I don't have any problem handling the 650's weight in paddling it back out of the garage or a parking spot. The weight is down very low. Compared to my V-Strom motorcycle, or my previous Kawaski Concours, both of which had large gas tanks up high - the 650 is very easy to handle at walking speed. That said, a shorter legged person might prefer the lighter weight and lower seat height of the 400.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,323 Posts
Ditto what Paul said.

The mirrors are the best I've seen on a bike for viewing whats behind you and they don't vibrate and get all fuzzy. Nice and clear.

Due to the weight being down low this machine handle awesome in the twisties. Cycle Canda Magazine did a review on the Burgman and Classified it as a Touring bike comfort with sportbike like handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Normsthename said:
I have almost made the decision to buy a 650 :)
I have a few of remaining questions for 650 owners.

1) I notice the mirrors are located low down, what is the rear view like?

Mirrors? whats to look at.? They are fine.

2) I may have to use the 650 in wet conditions

The most neutral handling bike ever made. ABS can only make it better. I had a patch of sand on a hill stop and started sliding out the rear...no problem. It took care of my ass. I love it.

3) What is a comfortable cruising speed (on a private road of course :)

650 will pull straight up to 100 without a thought, After the ton, it will still go to 115 indicated. 85 mph is breathing easy, with passing power to spare. Regular backroad passes from 55 mph (which is on the pipe), are snappy when you hit power mode and open it up., signal, make lane change, signal back in, hit standard mode. Ala mode.

4) The weight difference over the 400 is approx. 54kg (119 lb) I have had a few large cc bikes SV1000, GSXR-1000

Puhleeze...the 650 is 525 lbs that feels like 250. The trick to rolliing lowspeed manuevers is to sit stright up and turn the bars initally, not countersteer, and throw your balance opposite the turn. Dont worry.

Thanks in advance

Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
i road-tested both the 400 and the 650 today, back to back.
in-town, the 400 is in its element. on the superslab, i pinned the throttle and reached 145 kph..stayed there a bit too..lots of fun w/ the motor screamin'. but the superslab is 650 territory in the long run. its a no brainer, really. . with the 400, its just trying to cope with the high speed required. . the 650 was singing. .
but it's always FUN when you can pin the throttle! something you may never get to do on a GSXR 1000 or a ZX-12R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Andy,

All the above is spot on. One point that could be addressed more closely is the performance in wet conditions.

ABS should be viewed as a braking assistance device for wet weather riding, that you may in fact never use - but the one time it does engage, you are relieved. My advice is to get the ABS version if you can - you can never have too much brakes. I've also got an ABS Honda Reflex 250 big-scooter for the commute, and the confidence that simply knowing you have the ABS gives you allows you to brake much harder in the wet WITHOUT the ABS actually engaging, which makes you safer in the wet in itself. We are on a traffic light system over here, and if you do need to stop suddenly for a light change that you hadn't anticipated, or avoid a pedestrian, or U-turning taxi, or delivery truck, you have no problem - and the ABS probably won't even engage. You soon find yourself flying around town in conditions that on a race rep you'd be in "emergency upright mode". If ABS engages in the dry, you better get a bit more braking practice in...

For that reason, the 650 ABS model would be good for use in the UK, if you can stretch that far.

I don't have the ABS model, as I only wanted white which meant that I had to find a new unused 2002 model for purchase two months ago. In my opinion, white paint is as valuable a safety tool as ABS as you are far more visible than the silver ABS model. Preventative, passive safety. The fact that the 650 has such strong engine braking means that you don't need to brake that hard to slow, thus providing some passive braking assistance in the wet. I for one feel that the ABS Reflex aside, this is one of the best wet weather bikes I've ever ridden. Smooth torquey power delivery, comfortable riding position, upright wide bars - all the tools you need.

Forget about weight, it's no issue at all. Afterall, it's only about 220kgs - same as a Blackbird.

Best advice to you is to get a tet ride on a rainy day. It's the only way you can fing out for yourself.

Lycheed
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top