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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if its possible to devise a switch that would put the transmission (on the 650) into Neutral? I don't think cutting off the CVT will do it... that would probably just keep the transmission in 1st gear. The clutch disengages around 7mph and it would help if I knew exactly what it was that causes the clutch to disengage, that way I might be able to devise a switch to fool the clutch. Anyone have any clues at all?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Ok, I'm looking at the service manual for the 650. Page 2-32. It reads:

This motorcycle is equipped with an automatic clutch and variable ratio belt drive transmission. The engagement of the clutch is governed by engine RPMs and centrifugal mechanism located in the clutch.

I'm not mechanically inclined, but I was thinking along the lines of putting a switch into whatever feeds the clutch the RPM info. Any clues on how to do this?
 

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From the description it sounds mechanical to me. I don't think you're going to be able to do it.
 

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It is in neutral when the engine ain't spinning! :lol:
 

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Neutral safety switch

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I do agree, "It is in neutral when the engine ain't spinning!" However, I too would like a neutral switch on my Burgie. Actually, I have not really need one but I would like one any way (old habits die hard?).

I noticed a wiring diagram in the back of the service manual (I am quite dyslexic so I am not gonna challenge my eyes to brain connection trying to decipher that mess). If there is and you could locate a RPM sensor/low RPM sensor on the schematic and if you could physically easily/safely open the line to this sensor and place a remote switch in line (on/closed would be normal operation and off/open would be neutral?) located up near your fingers on the handlebars. This may do it....

However, funnier things have happened, simply opening the circuit could fry your Burgie's computer too.......

At 55, I have learned to accept the fact that I now know just enough to be dangerous and or destructive....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If it could be done, I'd wire the switch in two places... one on the handlebar, the other on the side stand.

That way, the side stand going down would place the bike in neutral (and I'd disengage the kill switch on the side stand). With that scenario, you'd never forget to lift the side stand back up, nor have to worry about kids revving the throttle with the bike on its side stand while the engine is running.

As for the handlebar neutral switch... not really needed but I want one anyway!
 

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EI

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Excellent idea to have a N switch on the side stand. N like U said, don't need one on the HBs but I too want one there also........

Any electrical schematic reader experts out there in Burgman land??
 

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chuck807 said:
...I'm not mechanically inclined, but I was thinking along the lines of putting a switch into whatever feeds the clutch the RPM info. Any clues on how to do this?
I believe the disengagement of the clutch is a purely mechanical action caused by springs overcoming the centripetal force holding the clutch in the engaged position, once the engine speed is low enough for the force of the springs to exceed the outward force.

Simply adding a switch somewhere wouldn't do it; you'd need to add motors or actuators of some kind to push or pull against the centripetal force at speeds above the current limit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Brian said:
chuck807 said:
...I'm not mechanically inclined, but I was thinking along the lines of putting a switch into whatever feeds the clutch the RPM info. Any clues on how to do this?
I believe the disengagement of the clutch is a purely mechanical action caused by springs overcoming the centripetal force holding the clutch in the engaged position, once the engine speed is low enough for the force of the springs to exceed the outward force.

Simply adding a switch somewhere wouldn't do it; you'd need to add motors or actuators of some kind to push or pull against the centripetal force at speeds above the current limit.
Its beginning to look like my quest for a neutral switch is in vain :(
 
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