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Discussion Starter #1
I pulled the spark plug on the wife’s EFI'ed Burgman 400 scooter at 600 miles and the ground electrode area is a nice enough tan color but the perimeter threaded area is blacker than I would normally have expected and the center electrode is a tad blacker than I would normally have expected.

The plug also has a discoloration on the first few turns of the thread and the plug was definitely not tight enough in the cylinder head.

The perimeter blackness of the plug suggests to me that it might be burning a tad rich or the plug overall might be running a tad cool.

Also given that the plug was not tight enough there may have been some small amount of blow-by past the plug’s fist few threads.

I am reluctant to switch to the next hotter range although I have that option according to the manual. As it stands there is no knocking and it runs fine. If it wasn’t such a bitch to change plugs I would run the next higher heat range for a bit and see.

Lots of Tupperware and an engine that is more buried and inaccessible than either my former Honda GL1500 or my new-ish '04 Honda VFR ABS! For a few bux more you’d think Suzuki would have built-in a few removable access panels to facilitate transmission oil access and valve adjustments etc. I am replacing the NGK CR7E with a new one.

Comments?
 

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Chumly said:
I am reluctant to switch to the next hotter range although I have that option according to the manual.
Comments?
If you are using the plug that came on the bike it is my understanding that the other sparkplug options are for a cooler plug not a hotter one.
I think I would clean that one first and try it a while. If it was loose then you are probably not getting a true reading of what's going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Swstiles,

Page 2-8 of the Service Manual lists three NGK plugs for the AN400
Hot Type CR6E
Standard CR7E
Cold Type CR8E

The NGK CR7E that was in the engine was the middle recommended heat range and not the hotter one.

It‘s not worth cleaning the plug as Lorco Auto Parts will sell me a new NGK CR7E for $3.97 Canadian (that converts to $3.22 in US pennies). I go along with NGK’s recommendations on how best to clean a plug and it involves sandblasting and a cleaner etc. http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/s ... country=US

I forgot to mention the air cleaner was not dirty at all and I have always used Chevron @ 87 octane.

Much thanks,
Chum
 

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You may be right about the plug running a little cooler. We are however coming into the summer months and things may change. Since everything was running all right I would personally replace the plug with the same knowing at least this time it will be tight. Also the rings will be better seated and you may not get as much up past the rings as you will with the first check. Just my 2 cents.
 

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when your right

Chumly said:
Hi Swstiles,

Page 2-8 of the Service Manual lists three NGK plugs for the AN400
Hot Type CR6E
Standard CR7E
Cold Type CR8E


Much thanks,
Chum
When your right, your right. I had only looked in the owners manual not the service manual.
Here is another quirk that I found between the owners manual and the service manual.

On page 7-21 of the owners manual it shows
Cold Inflation Tire Pressure
Solo Riding Front 25 lbs
Rear 29 lbs

Two up Riding Front 25 lbs
Rear 41 lbs

On page 11-10 in the Service Manual it shows
Cold Inflation Tire Pressure

Solo Riding Front 25 lbs
Rear 28 lbs

Duel Riding Front 25 lbs
Rear 32 lbs

It would be nice if they would get thier S$$$ together. :?
 
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