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Discussion Starter #1
I had a low-speed accident that caused alot of scuffing damage on both sides of the scooter.

Rather than pay thousands for replacement panels, decided I'm better off repairing or covering the ones I can (some simply have to be replaced, ordering those now).

Most of it can be sanded smooth and covered with decorative graphics, but in one key spot, three adjoining panels were "ground through" (i.e. abrasion caused a hole, but no cracks) or ground thin (there's still plastic, but it's alot thinner than it was). They still attach to the bike fine (so no key fasteners broken), just cosmetically there's a hole there. ;-p

So what I'm looking at is what on a metal-paneled car would be a very small "Bondo" job. Except obviously we're talking plastic here. It's also the edges of plastic panels so not easy to "support" while working (might only be able to support the patch from two edges, as "edges 3 and 4" are outside edges).

This sounds probably alot worse than it is, just don't have photos handy. I was thinking of just building-up a repair with JB Weld, but thought there might be better ways to do this and still not cost an arm and a leg or require advanced plastic making skills.

Just looking for a product, maybe JB-Weld-like that can be used to build back up a small amount of plastic damage, be it a hole or even a product designed to "build your own small parts" (i.e. it's moldable or shapable either during the patch or afterwards).

Any recommendations?
 

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Use heat, a heat gun and soldering iron and weld the parts use plumbing material which is ABS same as your parts. With the acetone that come with the glue for bonding the ABS you can make a paste using shaving of ABS. The spring clamps can be used to hold the parts together.

JB weld would not work as well. The painting is the hard part.
 

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I suggest you ride to your local automotive body and paint supply house and ask their advice. WIth modern cars there is a lot of plastic and there are products that are available to professionals and not typically to consumers to repair it. I know there are flexible "bondos" that will work on plastic. They can also give you tips on refinishing and can often custom mix paints by code and put it into spray cans for you.
 

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Bondo for ABS or heat gun welding will both work but the bondo method is probably more for the less experienced DIY guys.
Heat welding although fairly easy to do can take a bit more experience to it to make it look good on visible surfaces.
Good Luck with your repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
SteveE said:
I suggest you ride to your local automotive body and paint supply house and ask their advice. WIth modern cars there is a lot of plastic and there are products that are available to professionals and not typically to consumers to repair it. I know there are flexible "bondos" that will work on plastic. They can also give you tips on refinishing and can often custom mix paints by code and put it into spray cans for you.
You've obviously never been to my local auto parts shops. There's a reason I'm asking you guys and not them. ;-p

Chet_Benson said:
Use heat, a heat gun and soldering iron and weld the parts use plumbing material which is ABS same as your parts. With the acetone that come with the glue for bonding the ABS you can make a paste using shaving of ABS. The spring clamps can be used to hold the parts together.
This has me intrigued, except I don't have a head gun (just a cheap hairdryer for the few things I need heat for). Also playing with acetone to make my own plastic slurry doesn't sound all that fun fumes-wise? But it sounds like you're talking about buying PVC pipe, shaving bits off, cutting them up fine, and making my own "JB Weld" using the plastic bits and a bonding agent. Sounds messy, but also interesting if you could explain better.

Just to note: I don't plan to paint, that would be incredibly difficult to match on the 2007 red, WAY behond my skill. Do plan to sand-down the abraided but otherwise structurally sound areas so I can apply pinstriping or decorative graphics to cover the areas in question. However, some of the areas I need to "cover" have voids that need to be filled. Only need to be able to fill them and sand them smooth on the surface, which is not as difficult.

Not looking for perfect, and realize these cheapskate manuevers will hurt the resale on the bike. I'm okay with that.

Though you guys did provide some interesting starting points...that I may be able to weld up something behind the holes to support a repair while it cures. Such as making a mesh of zip-ties behind the voids so I can fill-in with another substance. A support lattice, as it were.

Do they make "Bondo for plastic" type products? Something I can get on Amazon or other online sources? Something a step above JB Weld but is fairly easy to work with?

I say Amazon.com because, again, my local auto parts stores are clueless and NEVER have what anyone in these forums assumes they will--or don't know where it is (which is kinda the same thing). Yes, they are that clueless.
 

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Try "googling" "where to buy ABS plastic sheets". I am sure that there are several sites that sell the sheets and they can be "welded/glued" to fill voids. The sites will most likely have the "weld/glue" for sell.
 

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you're talking about buying PVC pipe, shaving bits off,
No! The drain pipe is made of ABS, the pipe is labeled. Buy a cheap high wattage soldering iron and that will work. Was not only strong but air tight. This was a practice project. Tie wraps are most times made of nylon, will work but better to use same material.
 

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And here is where I do a facepalm...went over to eplastics.com, which was recommended in a few places in my Google search and after one look at the stuff I went..."DUH!"

I've worked with this stuff before and it's available at the local Tap Plastics. Now them I've worked with before on a few custom-cut plexi projects and that place has "everything plastic."

Jeez, talk about "duh." :oops:

I have a high-wattage soldering iron already but I might buy another one so I don't ruin my "good" one. My "good" one is a custom-built, variable temperature jobbie built by my dad, who was a professional electrician. ;-p

Sometimes I just need you folks to jog my memory to what is sometimes the obvious. I'm not very mechanical by nature, despite how often I make attempts at these DIY projects. :lol:
 

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CalvinFold said:
SteveE said:
I suggest you ride to your local automotive body and paint supply house and ask their advice. WIth modern cars there is a lot of plastic and there are products that are available to professionals and not typically to consumers to repair it. I know there are flexible "bondos" that will work on plastic. They can also give you tips on refinishing and can often custom mix paints by code and put it into spray cans for you.
You've obviously never been to my local auto parts shops. There's a reason I'm asking you guys and not them. ;-p

I didn't suggest your local auto parts store (they are clueless) I mean the local auto paint and body shop supply house the place where the pros go to get their auto body supplies. Trust me there are some local to you. These guys will know what they're doing. When I customized a car with fiberglass and bondo I lived at that place picking their brains, and the car...it won awards in car shows.
 

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Try googling "welding plastic" and go down to welding plastic with a soldering iron. The guy working the weld does a fairly nice job on a wheel. He is able to flare in the welded piece. You can use ordinary tie-wraps as the welding "rod". Good luck with your attempts and I hope you get good results.
Enjoy the ride.
Nodakrider
 

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Some of the latest 3-D printers work with thin ABS-cord on a spool, I imagine a near future where we can get new tabs "printed" directly on our tupperware to replace those taht have broken off.
 
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