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Where is there an outlet for the plastic snap pin bolts which Suzuki uses to keep our plastic scooter body covers together? The good old dealer wants a LOT of money for each one. I probably did not call them by their proper name, but, hopefully, someone will get the idea! :)
 

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Where is there an outlet for the plastic snap pin bolts which Suzuki uses to keep our plastic scooter body covers together? The good old dealer wants a LOT of money for each one. I probably did not call them by their proper name, but, hopefully, someone will get the idea! :)
In addition to what @BurgPnoMan and @maccecht said, you can search Amazon for, say, Plastic Rivets in the Automotive section. I did, and came up with this (among many other hits -- but this looks like a decent buy, and is well-reviewed and cheap):

 

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Scrivets is a new one on me. I've always called them push rivets. I bought an assortment of 6 and 8mm, and maybe 7mm from Amazon. Probably can get at a well-stocked auto parts.
 

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Scrivets is most often a reference to a particular type of plastic rivet (what I call them), or push rivet, or pop rivet. They are the ones with a threaded center pin and you turn the pin just a little, usually with a Phillips screw driver, to pop the center pin out. Then the plastic rivet can be extracted. They often look like this one used in the backrest lower cover on the 2013+ Burgman 650.
IMG_20200319_140159.jpg These are also used on other bikes and in other places. I had them on my ST1100 used for many of the plastic panels.

The more common plastic rivets used in more than one size on the Burgman scooters, as well as on other bikes like my ST and CTX1300 and even my old Gold Wing, are the push pin type. The center pin is slightly pushed in, but NEVER totally through, and then the plastic rivet can be removed. Like I show here. I use the corner of a standard screw driver to push the pin to the correct depth. Holding the screw driver at an angle as shown prevents pushing the pin too far. Then I show what it should look like when first removed, and what it should look like when "reset" and ready to be re-inserted. Then you would simply push the pin flush to lock it in place.
IMG_20200319_141735.jpg IMG_20200319_141853.jpg IMG_20200319_141927.jpg
There are also other types, like the large plastic rivets used in the dash cover and maintenance cover, which are removed by using something in the notch on the edge of the center pin to pry the pin out just a little to allow it to be removed.

Previous posts here have given a few sources for these. The important details to note when buying the right size for what you need is the diameter of the hole it fits and the depth or thickness of the layers it needs to hold. Both can be measured using a plastic rivet you already have.
 

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That makes sense...screw rivet = scrivet. I've wondered why random places on bikes will have one of these instead of the standard push type. Maybe they hold better? Just to confuse the owners and mechanics? Push...pry...twist...keeps you on your toes.

As an editorial aside/rant: The newer the bike the more complicated the plastic fastening system seems to be. The Japanese seem to pride themselves on hiding any fastening method, but at the expense of making it a complicated puzzle. Quite a marvelous engineering feat, though. The Helix (1980s technology) has a lot of plastic to remove, depending on what you're servicing, but it's all pretty straightforward - only basic screws of different types and some tabs to insert here and there, but you can see the fasteners and how everything is put together. On the '16 GSXS1000F there are screws, rivets, velcro, pins, tabs and slots of all types which are hidden so you can't see how to remove it. For example you might remove some screws and rivets, pull up in a certain place to release the velcro, then slide it horizontally to release a tab in a slot. Sometimes you don't know if something isn't releasing because you're just not pulling hard enough or if you have to perform some kind of Rubiks Cube move on it. And sometimes you find that out too late.
 
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