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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I saw that some people wanted to paint the lower section of their Givi windshields to hide the road dirt that often accumulates on the inside of the lower part of the windshield. Because of the location, this area is very difficult to keep clean. The OEM windshield is blackened at the bottom, possibly to mask this area. The Givi windshield is clear and any debris can be seen by anyone looking through the lower part of windshield.

Yesterday I painted the new Givi windshield I purchased for my Burgman 650 Executive. It came out very well, so I decided to share my experience.

I created a large sheet of paper by taping together several pieces of white typing paper. I took this large piece of paper and taped it over the outside of my OEM windshield, which had been removed from my scooter. I held the windshield covered with paper in front of a bright light and traced around the black paint at the bottom. I carefully marked where the round mounting holes were located on my drawing. I removed the paper and carefully cut out the form to make a template. (Photo 1)

Next, I taped the template inside my new Givi windshield, being very careful to align the holes so they rested directly over the four mounting holes in the new windshield. To help align them before taping, I inserted wooden dowels through the paper template into the corresponding hole in the windshield. Once the template was taped in place, I removed the wooden dowels and used a fine-tipped Sharpy marking pen to place a series of small dots on the Plexiglas around the outside of the template. Following this, I removed the paper template and set it aside.

Then, I placed small pieces of FrogTape (a new type of masking tape that absorbs paint along the edges) along the dotted outline that I created using the paper template. After the entire outline had been carefully surrounded with FrogTape, I wrapped pieces of newspaper on the exposed windshield to keep spray paint off.

To spray paint the pattern on the windshield I used black gloss spray paint specifically designed for painting plastic. It’s called Valspar Paint for Plastic and I bought it at Lowe’s. I applied two coats before carefully removing the masking tape parameter and pieces of newspapers. (Photo 3)

Once the paint was dry, I used a small amount of rubbing alcohol on a paper towel to remove any of the Sharpy outline dots that were still visible. The rubbing alcohol had no affect on the spray paint. (Photo 3)

I’m very happy with the outcome. The painted section on my new Givi windshield is perfectly aligned with the windshield mounting brackets and other components. The pattern and area covered is virtually identical to that found on the bottom of the OEM windshield. (Photo 4)
 

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Looks very good. Pat yourself on the back for a job well done.

Bill
 

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Beautiful work!

Did you apply the paint to the outside or the inside of the windshield? Years ago I painted parts of the inside of my windshield and it looked great. Applying paint to the inside protects the paint from the elements, keeping it from being "sandblasted" while riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The paint was applied to the inside of the windshield where it is protected from regular wear and tear.
 
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