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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm riding home from work (takes me about an hour and a half) and I notice my temp gauge starts creeping above the half way point, which is where it usually sits. I haven't noticed this happen before. The gauge reaches just past the 3/4 mark and the engine cuts out. After I stopped there was a small fist sized puddle of green liquid (coolant I'm guessing) under the bike. It wouldn't start again even after I let it cool right down.

I hope I'm posting this in the right place, any help or advice is greatly appreciated especially if anyone has experienced this themselves?

As a side note it might be completely unrelated but still makes me curious I often get a lot of little back fires or popping sounds when I slow down at high speeds what's that all about?

Thanks for reading this far if you can offer any help well that'd be amazing ;)
 

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I wont be the bearer of bad news. But coolant is critical to a liquid cooled engine, something that needs to stay inside the cooling system.

First check the coolant overflow tank. There is a view port it the same location as your gas cap. I usually have to remove the overflow tank plug to shine a beam in to check mine.

I suspect it will be dry. The next task to is locate the leak. This can help determine the cause of the problem. Look carefully. I am not familiar with the Burgman coolant pump, but when most pumps fail they weep out a hole. Did you ever see a green puddle after parking your scooter before? Coolant also has an acrid smell, have you noticed that before.

If you ran it any length of time without coolant, not good news.
 

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Remove radiator cap behind panel where the key is at, add coolant mix, Pressure test system to find leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No I haven't seen any green puddles before after it was parked and I haven't noticed an acrid smell. If I find the leak and fix it what's the next step? or would this actually prevent the bike from being able to idle? =/
 

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Check Hose Connectors, There Often Leak there as well, Tighten Screws on the Clamps for some time ,Weaken over time.

Elliott,
 

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Sounds as if the thermostat has failed to open or open fully after warm up and the engine has overheated. It's rare indeed for this to happen. Of course, it can be other things but you will lose some coolant if that happens. The other possibility is the head gasket has failed, but that's not very common at all but could account for the engine popping noises as the gasket started to fail in it's early stages. Also you can lose coolant if this happens. However, as the guys say, check the coolant level in the overflow tank and look for traces of oil. If there are any, it means the head gasket has almost certainly failed. If it's the thermostat, often fuel vapour lock can ensue which prevents the engine from restarting. You may have to churn the engine a bit so make sure your battery is fully charged. If it does not start then you much check fuel delivery to the injector by removing the injector. You may have to crack open the fuel line to let the air out. But don't mess with it if you are not fully competent, go to a dealer. Also, check the engine oil is full before attempting to restart. Obviously the thermostat should be replaced if you suspect that is the problem. The backfiring/popping, apart from a head gasket problem which is rare, is normally an indication of air leaks at the engine to silencer gasket, or the mixture is too weak. The lambda sensor may be loose on the exhaust downpipe which can let in air to the exhaust. It can be overtight valve clearances. Have they been checked at service? You could also have a hole in the silencer. There are many other causes such as (believe it or not, the fuel pump) but those are the most likely. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
that's a lot of information I'll look into it asap and no I'm not competent at this stuff it's very much learn as I go I just don't wanna be lazy and throw the bike in a garage every time with out trying to at least understand what's gone wrong. Thanks for the advice so far guys I'll post any updates on the situation.
 

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Although I've been a tech and engine design and development engineer for 33 years, I didn't know a thing about the Burgman 400 that I now have, when I first bought her. I've had her 2.5 years almost now. I service 5 other Burg 400 now on a regular basis. I've changed engines, stripped them and serviced them. Easy! Mine is the best bike I've ever had. I mostly rode big motorcycles before but don't miss them at all. The 400 Burg is very simple and straightforward in design. It's very robust too. It doesn't normally go wrong if looked after properly. You've just been unlucky I guess, but it's may not be anything too bad with yours. Good luck.
 

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Here is something else you may consider. It is possible for you to have "blown" a head gasket. This would account for antifreeze leaking and a no start scenario. One way to tell is to remove your spark plug to see if antifreeze has gotten into you cylinder bore. If so, it isn't quite the end of the world. (The following is drastically oversimplified) Remove the head, clean the surfaces and replace the gasket. If... You cracked the block, or head, still repairable but much more costly.

It could be something as simple as a loose/split radiator hose or overflow tank (hose). The hoses are near the coil and spray might have fouled the coil connections or main ignition lead.

If the temperature gauge did not remain pegged at maximum temperature for any length of time, it is not likely you sustained any engine damage if just a hose failed. However, if you find all hoses okay, you will need to examine the water pump.. (Easy fix) and replace it if
necessary.

Finally, it could be any of a number of other issues as listed by he guys on the forum. When troubleshooting, it is always best to look for the obvious, then find out "WHY" it failed. Solving the "WHY" is probably more important than finding the problem.

Hope this helps, and good luck with the fix.
 
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