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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got it yesterday. 2012 with 11,000 miles and perfect condition. After about 100 miles, I'm struck by the harshness of the ride. I rode another one recently and didn't notice that, but I didn't ride it far. Tire pressure is at book recommendation...33/41. I wonder if I could get away with lower rear tire pressure? However the front seems to hit bumps pretty hard as well. Pre load was at 2 when I got it, but I put it at 1 for more comfort, but it still seems pretty rough. Of course I'll crank it up if I get into the twistys. I don't like the mirror placement much, but I can live with that.

Good stuff....wonderful performance and handling. Very refined design. I like the manual over ride on the transmission, which is why I bought the Burgman. Most of my riding is touring and canyons. It's too hot to ride around town in Florida, even in the cooler months, so I head for North Carolina. I think the Burgman will be excellent for that, if I can get used to the bumpy ride.
 

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I'm struck by the harshness of the ride. I rode another one recently and didn't notice that, but I didn't ride it far. Tire pressure is at book recommendation...33/41.
This is a combination of the small diameter wheel/tires with low profile and the weak front springs/fixed orifice dampening/insufficient travel. With the front springs they can be replaced with firmer ones in which you do not loose half the travel just sitting on the bike. With the dampening one can either try different weight oils or install a adjustable valve (like the Race Tech gold emulators) in place of the fixed orifice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is a combination of the small diameter wheel/tires with low profile and the weak front springs/fixed orifice dampening/insufficient travel. With the front springs they can be replaced with firmer ones in which you do not loose half the travel just sitting on the bike. With the dampening one can either try different weight oils or install a adjustable valve (like the Race Tech gold emulators) in place of the fixed orifice.
Any idea what kind of money it would take to do this? I have no place to work in, so have to pay a tech to do this kind of stuff.
 

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Rear at 41 is the recommendation for 2-up. 36 is the psi for solo. It will soften up the ride a bit, but all of us do settle for some harshness. It is what it is.
 

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The trade off is superb stable handling in the twists and sweepers at speed a lot of softer suspensions get unstable in hard riding.
If a track rider on a VFR800 can't lose a 650 Burgman then you gotta know it's good in the canyons.
http://www.onewheeldrive.net/2006/10/04/scoot-touring-the-honda-silverwing-and-suzuki-burgman/

I think you may find the Powerbutton in the twists does a great job while you concentrate on the rest - it's a big part of what makes this a very special bike.

I was running at 41 cold but found it harsh and bit skittish.
I'm at 36 front 38 rear now and once the tires are warm they come up into the 40s.

at 41 the rear can get over 50 psi at high running temps and quite harsh. I have a real time PSi gauge and found it very useful to refine the ride/handling
 

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Any idea what kind of money it would take to do this? I have no place to work in, so have to pay a tech to do this kind of stuff.
I do not since I haven't completed a front suspension mod yet and that I do my own work. There are others on here who have either done mods themselves or paid to have them done. I just don't have a name that comes to mind. Though you could give RaceTech a call to get an idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I took comparison rides on my Burgman and V-Strom today and decided I'll sell the V-strom. that was my original plan but the initial rough ride on the Burgman made me wonder. I dropped rear tire pressure to 36 and that helped some. Sargent tells me they'll modify the Burgman seat for $400 plus shipping. The overall comfort and ease of riding made the difference. I've been riding for 60 years now and can still throw a leg over any cycle, but I guess it's time to take it a little easier. The burg is heaver to move around the garage than the V-Strom, but I can get it on and off the center stand and do everything I need to do with it.

Twisties are hard to find in Florida, but there's one place with about 8 linked serpentine twists we all use to test. The Burgman really shone in that test ride.

I'll be heading for a week or so of riding in North Carolina soon, and figure the day and a half on the slab will be more comfortable on the Burgman.

I'm glad I got it.
 

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Rear at 41 is the recommendation for 2-up. 36 is the psi for solo. It will soften up the ride a bit, but all of us do settle for some harshness. It is what it is.
Upon further consideration, I quoted from my 2007 Owner's Manual. I believe later model-year Manuals may have dropped the solo/dual rider distinction for rear tire pressure. I don't know the rationale for this. But as you've discovered, 36 psi provides a bit more cushion.

You chose wisely.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Right. My manual says 41 for both solo and dual. Doesn't make sense. I'm going with 36.

I once had a BMW that handled like a taxicab using factory recommended pressures.
 
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