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My 2001 400 has a engine noise.This noise cant be heared with the engine ticking over or reved when stationary. The noise can only be heared when the engine is under load;ie when moving off or accelerating. This noise sounds like someone hitting a small anvil with a hammer. Can any one also clear up what oils should be checked or changed at regular intervals.:confused:
 

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That sounds suspiciously like knocking (pre ignition). That is not a good thing as it can lead to major engine damage.

You may have carbon deposits that are causing the gas mixture to ignite before the piston reaches TDC.

Or your timing may be off, possibly from a loose timing chain.
 

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If it's pinging (pre-ignition), it should go away if you use higher octane gasoline, assuming everything else is OK.
 

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Silly question but have you checked the oil, some early Burgman's could burn oil,
is it something that as just started if so then it needs looking into, but if you are
new to the scoot the later ones are quite harsh noise wise on acceleration not
sure if the early ones are the same.
 

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....or piston getting ready to fail. :confused:
Hopefully not the case! ;)
 

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I went ahead and read the manual. It says that the bike requires 91 octane unleaded gas. I started using chevron supreme, and the bike seems to run better. Try that.
 

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I went ahead and read the manual. It says that the bike requires 91 octane unleaded gas. I started using chevron supreme, and the bike seems to run better. Try that.
You need to reread the manual and understand the different octane rating methods. The manual says you need 91 octane by the RESEARCH METHOD (RON). That is the number used in Europe, Australia and many other countries.

The octane listed on the pumps in the US, Canada, Brazil and a few other countries is not calculated by the RON method. There is another octane rating system called the Motor Octane Number (MON). The number listed on the pumps in the USA is the average of the RON and MON methods (RON + MON / 2). If you look at the manual again it says the under that rating system you need 87 octane.

Your bike should run just fine on regular unleaded. If it doesn't there is some kind of problem. That's all I've run in mine for almost 40,000 miles now.
 

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Ok. Thanks. Hard for me to understand that in the manual. But, I still put 91 octane in mine, and it seems to get better gas milage.
 

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If you read the manual correctly you will see that it says 'at least 87 octane' AND it also says 'less than 10% ethanol'. The gas here in the U.S.A. contains 10% ethanol. When my Burgman starts acting sluggish I put in a tank of premium and it seems to fix the problem.
 

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Unless your engine is knocking, buying higher octane gasoline is a waste of money. The following links will explain a lot about octane if you care to know.

What does octane mean?
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/fuel-consumption/question90.htm

Fact or Fiction?: Premium Gasoline Delivers Premium Benefits to Your Car
Paying a Premium for High Octane Gasoline?
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=fact-or-fiction-premium-g

Paying a Premium for High Octane Gasoline?
http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0210-paying-premium-high-octane-gasoline
 

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I don't use premium all the time, just when the engine starts acting up due to the ethanol. Someone mentioned to me the other day that there is an additive that can handle the ethanol problem. I don't know what it is called but that may be a better solution than always using premium, which gets expensive.
 

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