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An observation:
Often when members are describing their last group ride I see the "no problem keeping up" statement inserted in the ride description. Perhaps I need correction on this, but when would a Burg 650 ever have a problem keeping up on a group ride? The only exception I can see is, of course, if your group is comprised of sportbikes and they do the big leans and may need kneeguards (on a tangent, I don't understand how those guys can do big leans on blind curves, since they bet their life each time that a small boulder hasn't rolled off the hill onto the road, or that the oncoming car isn't a bit in their lane, or that there's not a bit of gravel in the turn....they must not have families).
In fact, I would almost posit that other bikes might have trouble keeping with an experienced BurgRider, since in the twisties in power mode the engine braking approaching/entering a curve combined with the strong "no shifting" acceleration seems to be an advantage. So unless the group ride is kickin through the twisties at 80 to 112.45562 miles per hour :shock: , I would think that "keeping up" would never be an issue.
Then again, maybe it was a 400.... :wink:
 

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Some of our members do ride AN400s in group rides. I ride with sport touring bikes sometimes with my AN650. Usually no more than 3 or 4 bikes. It is less work to keep up on that then when I ride the V-Strom. Either bike will keep up with a brisk pace. From what I remember of the big group rides I used to go on with the Goldwing riders, you could probably keep up with a good 250cc scooter.
 

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I think the 'keeping up' statement may be an off-handed apology. Sort of like explaining to your ignorant (and I nice that in the meanest way) friends that, "Yes, it's a scooter" and, "No, I suspect that you might be the one who can't keep up." 8) :D

Steve
 

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I think the "keeping up" is because we have to prove that we can to those "yahoo's" who think we can't. One of my first group rides with our SCRC chapter was such a ride. The guy leading it had a "Harley" of course, and one of the first things he said to me was "can you keep up?" I think this was 1: because I am a woman and 2: because I had a scooter. I told him I would do the best I could. We rode over across the Bay Bridge and to the Eastern Shore of Maryland. It was a fairly long ride and a beautiful ride. But, the speeds got up to 85 mph. (I know that was just for my benefit.) I had the Burg 400 at the time and had no problem keeping up. I impressed the other people on the ride who came up and starting admiring the bike. He finally had to admit that I could keep up when I walked up to him and said "did I keep up with you Roger?"

There are jerks out there who have the "short man with big Harley syndrom" and think a scooter just cannot keep up with them. I think if I had wanted to and the nerve, I could have out gunned him. I certaining could get away from a dead stop much quicker than he could. He also hasn't been allowed to lead a ride since.

But, I have been asked before when a rider who hasn't seen the Burgman leads a ride, if I can keep up and what kind of pace do I need. They just don't know what the Burgman can do, whether it is the 400 or the 650.
 

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I've encountered just one Harley rider that I couldn't keep up with. On my tour through South Dakota last Summer, this gal blew by me on the Interstate on a Harley, pulling a small trailer. I was going 85 mph - I estimate she was going about 120 mph. :shock: A few minutes later, and she was just a dot on the horizon. I knew I didn't have the top end speed to chase her. Obviously not a stock Harley - and a very un-Harley-like rider. I encountered one other Harley rider last Summer that was pretty darn good on curvy roads. These weren't ultra tight curves, but decent "sweepers". I kept up, but it was challenging, and I was wide open throttle a lot of the time. Finally came to a stop sign, and pulled alongside. He wouldn't look at me. :twisted:
 

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MaryVande wrote
He also hasn't been allowed to lead a ride since
And that's good :!:
Next time your on a group ride you may want to remember the idea is for the group as a whole to enjoy the ride. Top speed should be the speed limit -ideally top speed should be set by the slower riders - this is a fun ride not a race. You really prove nothing by keeping up, some folks are just to dense to learn anyway.
You have to ride your own ride no matter how big the group your still the only one responsible for you :)
 

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Randy said:
And that's good :!:
Next time your on a group ride you may want to remember the idea is for the group as a whole to enjoy the ride. Top speed should be the speed limit -ideally top speed should be set by the slower riders - this is a fun ride not a race. You really prove nothing by keeping up, some folks are just to dense to learn anyway.
You have to ride your own ride no matter how big the group your still the only one responsible for you :)
Amen, Randy! And I like to use the term "Run with" rather than "Keep up".

Don :D
 

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On the mountain roads I ride with my 400 I'd say about 80% of the guys on sportbikes have trouble "keeping up" with me. Most have to "jack it up" to about 100 mph down the straights so they aren't too far behind going through the twisty parts. It's OK, I tell them I couldn't go any faster it's just a 400 single. Some of the guys just try to erase the whole thing from their memory as it just hurts the ego too much.

Thanx,
Russ
 

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Burgie 400

Keeping up has not been an issue with my 400 either. If my riding buddies need to pass at 85+, I am right there with them. Of course, safety is ALWAYS #1!
 

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I took a one-piece leathered 998R rider on the flat through the mountains on the Reflex 250, and slaughtered so many litre race-reps on downhill sections I can’t count them. Upright position, CBS, light-weight – these components together make for a very quick motorcycle indeed.
In my experience on the 650, if you know your bike and someone is traveling faster then you can go, they are probably riding inappropriately for the road. I rarely find a rider that can keep up with the 650 though a decent set of bends.

Re knee-down riders:
1. I have overtaken a CBR600 rider knee down on a left hander, with my girlfriend on the back.
2. ‘Knee down’ is only one way of going round a bend, which doesn’t mean that the rider is going fast. In fact it is a technique to go around any given bend at less lean angle than you would do if you were leaning with the bike, whilst allowing you to sense lean angle.
3. Although I use the ‘knee down’ technique on selected roads with good visibility on my race-bike, leaning with the bike is a far safer technique for road conditions – you can sense lean angle with your toes or ‘hero blobs’ on your footpegs, and you can operate the rear brake easily and adjust your angle of lean easily mid-turn if you need to. On the AN400/650 you can sense lean angle by angling out the tops of your toes as you ride.
4. Most ‘knee down’ riders are so focused on actually getting their knee down that they are slow through bends.

This is not a way to keep up, but a way to lead – for hours and hours and hours.

Re Goldwing riders:
Over here, like Japanese BMW riders, Goldwing riders are experienced complete nutters and ride at a relentless pace. Heaven forbid that you meet one on the highway or any sweeping roads. Perhaps the fastest bike on the road is a well ridden STX1300 – comfort of the AN650, V4 engine with 125bhp and loads of torque, 70 litres of luggage space. Anyone have $15,000 to spare?
 

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I've ridden on plenty of group rides since summer and found that guys won't say anything to me starting out but will often come up to me at a rest stop to say, "Wow, you really kept up well. That's some bike!" and other complimentary things about 1) Sushi as a bike and 2) me as a rider. :D A classier way to handle it, dontcha think?

I do have to pay particular attention to opening the throttle from a stop if I'm road captain: Sushi (who is a 400) just wants to RUNNNNN! :blob7: And the Victorys and H-Ds need time to gear up. 8)

Sushi has won over many riders. Also, they now realize that I'd be giving up a lot--speed, flickability, storage--if I decided to ride a regular bike at this point. And while they mostly wouldn't give up their bike for a scooter, they have also come to respect megascoots and their riders in a different light just through their exposure to us. :)

Ride safe,

Bryna
 

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Keeping up with Sportbikes

My friend rides a Yamaha YZF-R1 and he teases me a lot about riding a "scooter." Several weeks ago, I had an opportunity to show him how quickly the Burgman 650 accelerates for a "scooter." He opened a garage door for me and I brought my bike from front of my office to the rear garage area to park it inside. He was standing outside waiting for me, and I went full throttle towards him as I approached the garage. His eyes opened up quite a bit! He told me he was absolutely stunned at how fast I came down the parking lot and pulled into the garage. When we went for a ride (to go eat) I kept right with him on turns and in traffic. It was only on straight roads with no cars that he out-accelerated me. Overall, he was impressed with the Burgman... but he still teases me about riding a "scooter." He did suggest that I hang plastic "balls" off the rear splashguard to show people that it's got ... you know... balls!
 

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A few years ago, when I first started riding with a Goldwing group, I have my Honda Shadow 600cc.
That summer, I decided to go to Americade for the first time, riding with a group of goldwing riders from chapter E. Well, the leader, a retired cop, got really pissy with me when he found out I was riding along. He went on and on about the fact that I'd have to stop every 100 miles for gas, and how I was going to slow down the whole group. Well, guess what...everytime we had to stop for me, all the other riders were greatful. This gave the ladies a chance to go potty and chat. The smokers could have a leiserly smoke, and everybody was glad for the fanny break. So, all in all most, if not all were glad that I came along...for a good excuse to make a pitstop. Needless to say, later on that year the leader was the cause of the chapter to break up.
I guess what I'm trying to say here is, if you're with a group, most likely there will be others who are greatful for going slower, or having to stop more often. Don't let the "full of themselves" people make you feel bad for riding what you ride. My feeling is...if I'm suffering..from fanny fatigue or just tired, then I'm not enjoying the ride. Stop, take a break, then continue. You'll be refreshed, and find the ride much more enjoyable. Theres also alot to be said for going slow, and enjoying the scenery alongside the road, instead of a ride that is a total blurr.
 

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I totally agree with Wilder Days. I'm not an aggressive rider and, whenever I've ridden with "full of themselves" riders and those who have to keep up with them, I just let them go. I've got a good sense of direction and maps and I enjoy a more leisurely ride.
I like to take a break about every hour or so, take a smoke on my pipe and just enjoy shooting the breeze with my buddies. Apparently most of my riding friends like this type of riding too - whenever we take an extended ride or a trip, I'm usually selected to lead the ride.
When we hit a stretch of twisties or high speed roads and anyone wants to test their riding skills, they know to just go ahead of the group and then wait for the others to catch up at some convenient point. This arrangement has worked well for us in the almost 30 years we've been riding together.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #17
When I ride solo in the mountains or the backroads I also like to indulge my other little hobby-- photography. I am constantly looking for places to stop where I can photograph the Burg with a beautiful backdrop...and it's fun to peruse the photos later and remember the details of the ride. I have a growing collection of "just the road" photos also, twisty back or mountain roads just beckoning to be ridden.......
 

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I've done the "photoshoot" thing in the fall. I take a nice leisurely ride on country rodes, stop and take alot of pictures with the beautiful colored trees in the background.
Sometimes on my way home from work, I find myself taking the lloooonnnngggg way home. All back roads. Its so much nicer when I can get away from traffic, and just go at my own speed, checking out the scenery, instead of watching the cages all around me.
 

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Since most bikes in America are displacing over 650cc, perhaps the phrase is used to convey that even a smaller engine can keep up with bigger ones, thereby causing some confusion as to why some bikes need 1800cc to have fun???
 

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Wilder Days, Mi SeaRider
You sound very much like Tourers - much like myself. Although I can do the knee down racer thing on the track-bike, I prefer to leave that for the circuit. The beauty of bikes like the AN650 is that they can travel at 20km/h or 120km/h without any feeling or speed - which means that you don't feel irritated whilst traveling slowly as you do on a race bike. Even on my 1100 naked, traveling below 40km/h requires effort and is tiring.

The reason for my purchase of the 650 is that I spend weekends touring in tandem, chatting on the intercom system to the background of stereo soothing music, snapping photos and taking in the view. Often we take the narrowest most forgotten woodland and mountain roads we can find and cruise along at 20km/h, visor up, enjoying the fresh air, stillness and deep calm. When you are touring, you never ‘get there’ – the journey is part of the experience. We often camp, or stay in spa hotels where we relax and enjoy spending time together away from the stresses and lightening pace of the cities. Regrettably, due to our careers we don’t spend much time together on week days.

There are those riders that strongly associate adrenalin with motorcycling – I must confess that I come from the school of thought that doesn’t, and professes that ‘smooth is quick’: even on the race track, you should be relaxed and not feeling ‘charged’ by adrenalin if you are to lap quickly and consistently. Quite the opposite, when you are ‘in flow’ or in total focus, it’s almost like having an out of body experience where you watch yourself riding and feel as calm as if you were asleep. I’m no suggesting that I am ‘in-flow’ when touring – quite the opposite in fact as I’m too busy talking, looking around, and generally enjoying myself. For me, riding the AN650 is a way to relax. The AN650 is extremely good at that.
 
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