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Randy said:
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/classifieds/automotive/8990016.htm?1c
Grrrrr .... Account required to read the article. :evil: I don't mind (much) having to signin to post, but loath sites that require you to sign up just to read the content. One reason I've never looked at the Burgman forums on yahoo.
 

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Also gave up on Yahoo

This is far superior to the Yahoo group anyhow.
Gary :shock:
 

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Really good article!! I hate signing up just to read something too, soooo....I just gave them my old e-mail address and an alias for my name. THIS IS THE ONLY FORUM I WANT TO BELONG TO!! :p
 

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MOTORCYCLES


Scooter could earn 'real-bike' status

Suzuki's new Burgman 650 is not your typical lightweight ride. It is one of a new generation of bigger, more capable scooters.

BY JAMES HESKETH

Special to The Herald


Might scooters be the next Volkswagen Beetle?

When the ''Bug'' first appeared in the U.S., Americans had a hard time accepting it as a real car. While U.S. carmakers kept building bigger and more powerful automobiles, the small German import was mostly favored by eccentrics and students who couldn't afford anything better.

But over time, the little V-Dub found its place in our hearts and in garages as people began to appreciate its convenience and economy as a commuter. Eventually, due to the success of the Beetle, Volkswagen became a major player in the American automobile market and later began producing larger, mainstream vehicles.

Among many motorcyclists, scooters likewise are not accepted as ''real bikes.'' They have traditionally been little more than economical commuters also for eccentrics and students who couldn't afford anything better.

But, over the past decade, as America reurbanizes itself, scooters are becoming a major form of transportation. Just as Volkswagen grew in size and power as Beetle popularity grew, scooters are doing the same.

Suzuki, last year, introduced its version of one of these new-generation ''Super Scooters'' -- the Burgman 650. It is a bike that blurs the line between scooter and motorcycle.

RARE POWER

Generally, three things separate scooters from motorcycles: scooters have step-through frames (like a traditional girls bicycle), light (50-250cc) displacement engines and a ''twist-and-go'' automatic transmission.

While the Burgman has the step-through frame of traditional scooters, it is powered by a 638cc, DOHC, eight-valve, 54-horsepower, liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, counterbalanced, two-cylinder engine coupled to a sophisticated automatic transmission.

It's this tranny that really sets the bike apart from anything else on the road today, said Todd Sandival of from Palmetto Motorsports.

Suzuki's electronically-controlled continuously variable transmission gives the Burgman three modes of operation. This massive scooter has two settings when using it as a fully automatic twist-and-go scooter: With the push of a button, the rider can choose between a standard ''economy'' setting or a lower ''power'' setting that increases the rpm by 1,500 for extra oomph off the line or when passing another vehicle.

The third option is to manually shift through the five speeds with a handlebar-mounted thumb-switch, which acts like Porsche's Tiptronic-style shifter.

The manual option was fun to play with, but it didn't improve the bike's performance, at least on flat roads here in South Florida. It would, however, come in handy when riding in cities with steep hills, such as San Francisco, or when riding over mountains on a cross-country ride.

COAST-TO-COAST

The Burgman certainly has the power and comfort for coast-to-coast rides -- something no sane person would consider on a traditional scooter. Suzuki claims a top speed of 112 mph. While I can't confirm that, the Burgman had no trouble keeping up with aggressive I-95 drivers, and had plenty of power to put traffic behind me without much effort.

Long days in the saddle are possible with this bike. The driver's seat is plush and, without having to straddle a fuel tank or frame section, it is more comfortable to sit on than some furniture.

Traditional telescopic forks up front and twin shocks in back keep the ride smooth and comfortable on rough roads. The windshield does a good job of keeping wind flow down to a comfortable level and the wide-set mirror pods double as hand guards.

My wife said the passenger seat was one of the most comfortable she has ever sat on. But one drawback to this bike is that adding a passenger affects its handling. The front end felt light and the bike wiggled whenever my wife readjusted herself on the seat.

This is probably due to the fact that the majority of her weight was centered behind the rear axle, and that her seat is seven or eight inches higher than the driver's.

Another factor could be the size of the wheels: Most motorcycles ride on 17, 18 or even 19-inch wheels, while the Burgman sits on a 14-incher up front and a 15-inch rear. The smaller wheels may provide less rotational stability because the gyroscopic effect is lessened.

Whatever the reason, the wiggle wasn't so drastic that it would stop me from taking her for a long ride.

Storage on the Burgman is impressive: A large under-seat compartment can easily hold two full-face helmets, a couple bags of groceries or a briefcase. Three convenient under-dash compartments -- one is lockable and has a power outlet to charge electronics -- keeps necessities such as change for tolls and parking meters, a cell phone, a water bottle, gloves or lightweight rain gear handy.

A HEAVYWEIGHT

Even at 525-pounds (surprisingly, this is the heaviest bike in Suzuki's entire line) the Burgman's slow-speed handling is a pleasure due to the 29-inch seat height and low center of gravity. When riding alone, it was easy to make tight U-turns and maneuver around obstacles in packed parking lots.

Make no mistake about it: The Burgman is a real bike. It is much more than an economical commuter.

At $7,699 the Burgman is not the typical scooter for beginners or budget-conscious students but, like the VW owners of the '60s, former scooter riders who remember the fun and ease of riding small scoots but have since grown up and can afford high-quality bikes, would do well to look at this bike, too.
 

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this was in my local paper!!! Can't beleive I missed it as I've been reading this guy's column for years now.
 

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by the way, the yahoo forum is also a great place to learn a lot and meet fellow burgie owners. I started there first and check in there often.
 

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Did anyone else reading this article see the mistakes? No big deal but it should be 15inch front wheels, 14 inch rear wheels. Also, he states that the passenger seat is 7-8 inches higher that the driver! WOW!! Either he had a Burgman unlike any other ever seen, or just small mistakes. Just kidding. It really is a good story no matter what. 8)
 

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JD said:
Did anyone else reading this article see the mistakes?
It also said the manual option would come in handy in San Fran, or the mountains. I haven't had my bike in San Fran, but have been there and know the hills well. I have had my bike on hills like in San Fran, and also up in the mountains and it doesn't skip a beat. There was no need for me to go into manual mode as it held it's own climbing. Actually, I couldn't even tell I was climbing it worked so well.
 

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Kias said:
JD said:
Did anyone else reading this article see the mistakes?
It also said the manual option would come in handy in San Fran, or the mountains. I haven't had my bike in San Fran, but have been there and know the hills well. I have had my bike on hills like in San Fran, and also up in the mountains and it doesn't skip a beat. There was no need for me to go into manual mode as it held it's own climbing. Actually, I couldn't even tell I was climbing it worked so well.
I figured that the manual would be useful going downhill. Anytime I ever drove through the mountains, when I was going down a steep hill, it always seemed like the vehicle was in more control in a lower gear. The manual on the Burgman should keep you at a safe speed without having to ride the brakes too much.
 

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JD said:
Did anyone else reading this article see the mistakes? No big deal but it should be 15inch front wheels, 14 inch rear wheels. Also, he states that the passenger seat is 7-8 inches higher that the driver! WOW!! Either he had a Burgman unlike any other ever seen, or just small mistakes. Just kidding. It really is a good story no matter what. 8)
Yes, there were a lot of small mistakes. Power mode raises rpm by 1000 rpm, not 1500 as stated (another example). Carrying a passenger doesn't make my front wheel feel light, but a heavy passenger can make starting & stopping (very low speeds) feel a bit awkward - raises the center of gravity a lot. But in tone, it was a favorable article. Thanks for sharing it with us csachs1.
 

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I just did a 7% downhill grade for 4 miles in regular automatic mode. I had to give it a tad bit of throttle to keep it at 35mph. If it was any steeper, I would have probably put it in manual...
 

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JD said:
Really good article!! I hate signing up just to read something too, soooo....I just gave them my old e-mail address and an alias for my name. THIS IS THE ONLY FORUM I WANT TO BELONG TO!! :p
Two things drove me away from the Yahoo groups last year. I used my real address for sign-up, and I started getting bombarded with email spam. Funny thing, but I belonged to 3 Yahoo groups, and I would often get triplicates of each spam email. More than a coincidence I think. The other thing is that the Burgman group had several real idiots dominating discussions at that time. Their points of view were often ridiculous and they would aggressively keep persuing them for days - it became tiresome. Maybe things have changed for the better, but I've got all I can do to keep up with the message traffic in this forum now - and folks who participate here are clearly a better bunch than the group that was in the Yahoo forum when I was there.

I recognize that some folks participate in both forums, and I'm not trying to discourage that at all - but like JD I'm happy here, and I've got no desire to go back to Yahoo.
 

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pauljo said:
JD said:
Really good article!! I hate signing up just to read something too, soooo....I just gave them my old e-mail address and an alias for my name. THIS IS THE ONLY FORUM I WANT TO BELONG TO!! :p
Two things drove me away from the Yahoo groups last year. I used my real address for sign-up, and I started getting bombarded with email spam. Funny thing, but I belonged to 3 Yahoo groups, and I would often get triplicates of each spam email. More than a coincidence I think. The other thing is that the Burgman group had several real idiots dominating discussions at that time. Their points of view were often ridiculous and they would aggressively keep persuing them for days - it became tiresome. Maybe things have changed for the better, but I've got all I can do to keep up with the message traffic in this forum now - and folks who participate here are clearly a better bunch than the group that was in the Yahoo forum when I was there.

I recognize that some folks participate in both forums, and I'm not trying to discourage that at all - but like JD I'm happy here, and I've got no desire to go back to Yahoo.
Just one more good thing to say about this forum, no crappy spam. You only get what you want, which is to be notified of replies to your posts. Keep up the good work Paul!!!
 

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pauljo said:
...Yes, there were a lot of small mistakes. Power mode lowers rpm by 1000 rpm, not 1500 as stated (another example)....
Speaking of small mistakes, on my Burgman switching to Power mode raises RPM by 1000.
 

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pauljo said:
JD said:
The other thing is that the Burgman group had several real idiots dominating discussions at that time. Their points of view were often ridiculous and they would aggressively keep persuing them for days - it became tiresome. Maybe things have changed for the better, but I've got all I can do to keep up with the message traffic in this forum now - and folks who participate here are clearly a better bunch than the group that was in the Yahoo forum when I was there.

I recognize that some folks participate in both forums, and I'm not trying to discourage that at all - but like JD I'm happy here, and I've got no desire to go back to Yahoo.
Nope, nothing's changed. I just quit that forum for the same reason.
Nitpicking idiots who would harp a thing to death.

Glad I found this forum with "adults" in it. :)
 

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JD said:
Nope, nothing's changed. I just quit that forum for the same reason.
Nitpicking idiots who would harp a thing to death.

Glad I found this forum with "adults" in it. :)



I'll second that emotion. Kudos to the members and moderators for keeping these discussions rational and respectful.

It must be contagious because I've noticed at least one of the real PITAs in the Yahoo groups now posts here and has been a positive contributor.

Regards,

Dan
 

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dancote said:
I'll second that emotion. Kudos to the members and moderators for keeping these discussions rational and respectful.
It must be contagious because I've noticed at least one of the real PITAs in the Yahoo groups now posts here and has been a positive contributor.
Regards,
Dan
Not me is it? :cry:
 
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