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I do not have my 400..yet. I thought that I would get the 400 first then eventually get the EXECUTIVE 650.

My question is countersteering. I am riding a Honda Metro. I have been to MSF. To my surprise, I could steer the Metro WITHOUT countersteering.

I know that countersteering is more of a speed thing.

Do any of you notice that you countersteer or is it an automatic action?
 

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Yep. I counter-steer all the time rather than just leaning the 400. By forcing myself to counter-steer, I've made it a habit and when I need to move the bike quickly (such as a road hazard or correct a misjudged curve) it's my first reaction. For some reason I respond backwards to counter-steering. Most people think push right to go right. I think pull left to go right. :? It's the same result but a little backward thinking.
 

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I once had a yamaha 50cc moped, and like you just pointed it in the direction I wanted to go. With a light-weight and low powered scooter you don't need help getting that mass to change direction. You would start by leaning, then steer the scoot the same direction as the lean. When I moved up to a 300+ pound Honda 250 scooter, I learned quickly that by turning the wheel right I could get the large mass to tip left, then easily follow through with a left turn. Same even more true as the scooters get heavier. Newton's Laws come into play.

Dave B.
 

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Even though most of us never heard of countersteering until we took the MSF courses, the only way a bike will turn above "walking speeds" is to first make the frame lean in the direction of the turn. One way this can be done is by pressing on the left or right footpeg on a regular bike to make the frame lean in the direction we want to go. Another way is to lean your body in the direction you want to go. However, this type of movement causes the rider to press the handgrip on the side he is leaning towards and is actually countersteering.
The purpose of making you aware of countersteering in the MSF classes is that "press right - go right and press left - go left" is the QUICKEST and easiest way to make the bike respond. In an emergency swerve or tightening up a turn that the rider entered too fast, pressing on the pegs (or floorboards) or leaning takes too long for the bike to respond and is not as controllable as pressure on the grips.

Don
 
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