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Just got a 2006 Burgman 650. Have had lots of other bikes but new to the maxiscooter segment. Paid $3K with 13,000 miles. Could not let it pass for that price. However, this bike has no owners manual. I found a link for downloading the service manual for free-which I did. Is there any downloads for the owners manual? Need the basics on maintenance, operation ect.
 

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Did not realize they were that cheap. Did find a free download for the service manual. Thought that was a nice bonus. [Edit by moderator to remove illegal service manual download.]

Pictures are not the best but can't complain too much. Most of the service intervals and fluid requirements are in the service manual. I can operate the bike fine but there are always little things to make life easier.

I still have my 2008 Honda Goldwing and will see how the Burgman "little wing" matches up. I have had 4 different Goldwings, Kaw vulcan 1500, kaw 1000 and 650, Honda 750, and several other bikes. The Burgy is much easier to maneuver, flicks around the curves with ease and getting up to speed is deceptively fast. I can now understand how many bikes would have difficulty keeping up on a twisty road. I don't see how the Burgy is a good touring machine with the small, OEM windshield. Maybe the first new accessory. The wind buffeting is nasty at 60 mph. The motor is really quiet. Brakes are really good. Best brakes of any bike I have owned. Dual dics in the front really do the job and nose dive is not bad. However, you will certainly slide forward on the seat in a hurry. Gas tank on the Goldwings stops that issue and the seat holds you better on the wing. Thought I was going to "drop in the hole" th first time I tried the brakes hard just to see how fast it would stop coming up to a stop light. Lesson 1: You need to have your feet planted farther forward in a hard stop on the Burgy.

Any way to disable killing the engine when putting down the kickstand? I find that really annoying. Every other bike in the world can do that. Even little automatic tranny motorcycles like the Kaw 110 my kids had. The Burgy does have park brake which is useful. If the park brake is on, it should allow the driver to put down the kickstand, and get off the bike with it running.

Plan to order the newer stopper bolt for the tranny. Love these forums. If you really want to learn your machine, they are invaluable. The tranny failure issues on the Burgy are a little disturbing but does not seem to be a widespread issue.

Time will tell if I keep the Burgy or Goldwing. In the recent past, I would frequently log 500 miles in a day. Rode 24 hours once on a Goldwing. Wasn't the plan but just worked out that way. Most of my riding now is now local or short day trips. A loaded Goldwing is a PITA in stop and go city driving. Just myself (185 lbs), loaded gear and full fuel tank is probably close to 1100-1200 lbs. And a lot of the weight is located up high. The weight is the main reason I rarely have another rider unless it is short distances. Years ago, I laid one of my goldwings on its side to see if I could lift it. I could barely lift it upright by myself. Don't think I could do that today. I don't think the burgy would be any issue. May have to try it one of these days. :wink: I currently do 50% mountain riding and the curves on the fat Goldwing can get a little nerve racking with too much speed or a tight unexpected curve. I have had my share of engine guard scrapping on the Goldwing going around mountain curves. Is it even possible to scrape the sides of a Burgy? Otherwise, it is mostly riding down the open highway and limited town riding on the Goldwing. With the Burgy, town riding will go up but open slab riding will be limited.

How many riders trailer their 650 and then go riding when they get to their destination?

What kind of antifreeze does the Burgy use? Standard green, ethylene glycol?

BTW, do they have to be called "Scooters". Even my owners title says scooter. Can they be called a "contemporary motorcycle"? When I ride I see 80% cruiser bikes (mostly harleys), 17% sport bikes, 3-4% goldwings or true touring bikes, and 1-2% contemporary motorcylces/others.
 

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radman said:
Any way to disable killing the engine when putting down the kickstand?

Is it even possible to scrape the sides of a Burgy?

How many riders trailer their 650 and then go riding when they get to their destination?

What kind of antifreeze does the Burgy use? Standard green, ethylene glycol?

BTW, do they have to be called "Scooters".
One could bypass the switch but you be risking a runaway bike if anyone touched the throttle sitting there.

Yes I've scraped the centerstand and others have done more than that.

I had once trailered mine to Moab, UT on a Jeeping trip and rode it over in Colorado.

Yes regular green anti-freeze is fine.

Because a scooter has an automatic and low step through.
 

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They don't have to be called scooters. Legally they are motorcycles. However scooters are a subset of motorcycles just like cruisers or sport bikes or off road bikes or any other subset. If you don't want to call it scooter don't. Just don't expect everyone to agree with you.
 

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We have gone through the debate on what is a "scooter" and what is a "motorcycle" many times before. Usually it revolves around where the engine and transmission are located. Sometimes the argument mentions where the gas tank is located.

Consider this...Honda has just come out with 5 models with the same engine, same automatic transmission, same frame, same wheels and tires, same 70 mpg fuel consumption, same suspension (with minor adjustments)...but with different external bodywork to make it appear that they are totally different bikes. Four are sold as a "motorcycle". One is sold as a "scooter". What can you point to that defines the Honda NC700D Integra as a "scooter"? ...except that Honda is marketing it as one. The only other thing I can see as a difference between the Honda NC700X, NC700S, NC700D, CTX700 and CTX700N is the NC700D Integra has a full fairing that blends into the floorboards. The CTX700 has a fairing, but no floorboards. Just footpegs. It's a "motorcycle", not a "scooter". So does that mean that if you have footpegs on your Burgman...650, 400 or 250...that you have a motorcycle? :lol:

In Honda's case, it seems they chose to market the Integra as a "scooter" for comparison purposes. Here are some quotes from a review that didn't seem like the standard rewording of an advertising brochure. http://www.moto-choice.com/en/Bike-Revi ... world.html Here's a quote that indicated to me that Honda was very shrewd to dress up a motorcycle in scooter clothes.
At such a (fast) pace, the Integra is better than any scooter, handling is within the 600 c.c. street bike category standards.
As you would expect, a full fledged "motorcycle", even when disguised as "scooter", comes out best in the suspension department.

Probably describing the Integra the name scootercycle sounds better, although its rather a motoscooter, that is more a bike than a scooter.
There were a lot more words in the review that basically said they were having the same problem...what is a "scooter"? And what is a "motorcycle"?

Chris
 

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Yep - meaningless distinction these days given the range of vehicles and in particular the big Aprilla Mana just destroys the distinctions - excellent suspension, power, higher step through etc and the BMW sport version and the Honda DCT versions all blur the line.

If anything urban scooter for the Vespa crowd and maxi at least bookends the range

My ride is a Burgman 650 ...KISS. :thumbup:
 
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