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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,
I help my neighbor with mechanical things when I can. He recently bought a 2008 Suzuki 400. He brought it over so I could help him with the normal maintenance. Flush coolant, change gear oil etc. Now I own and have owned several Goldwings as my screen name gives away. I thought they were hard to work on until I came upon this scooter. We must have worked two hours to change the gear oil. I downloaded the free service manual. It is helpful but not great as it says remove a certain thing but never says how it is removed. It can't be that painful, is it? Do I have to take the cover off the handlebars and soooo much tupperware to change the gear oil? He is doing the 7500 mile maintenance that includes the following. Air cleaner element, Exhaust pipe bolts and muffler bolts, Valve clearance,I Spark plug, Engine oil, Engine oil filter, Final gear oil, Idle speed, Throttle cable play, Cooling fan filter Clean every, Engine coolant Replace every 2 years, Drive V-belt, vapor hose every 4 years PAIR (air supply) system, Brake fluid, Steering, Front fork, Rear suspension, Chassis bolts and nuts


Now I realize that is quite a laundry list and some should be inspected while others replaced etc. My question is how much plastic would I expect to remove to do this "normal maintenance?" We have attempted the job with the owners manual as well as the free download and it just seems way to hard. Suzuki can't expect that much work for normal maintenance....can they? What am I missing? Thanks in advance everyone.
 

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Hi redwing, welcome to the site. The 2007+ Burgman 400 is one of the easiest bikes on the market to service. Much easier than my GSX1400 or Vstrom 1000 for example. Hardly any plastic paneling has to come off to do a 7500 service. The whole bike has been designed to be service friendly. But being new to the bike, it can look a bit daunting until you know the bike.

I don't think you have the correct workshop manual download. The 2008 model has the dohc motor with bucket and shims, so you are probably reading the wrong manual. The valves don't need checking until 14.500 miles. Don't do them on a time basis, only mileage. You do not at anytime have to remove the handlebar plastic covering for any service. Engine idle speed cannot be adjusted on the dohc motors or indeed any of the fuel injected bikes, but you can adjust the throttle cable but it should never be used to influence the idle speed. The engine coolant, if it is the green Suzuki original can be changed for the Suzuki 4 year life blue coolant. Spark plug is accessed by removing the panel at the front and just under the seat and it's easy to get to the spark plug after that. Air filter, again easy by removing the panel under the seat in front of the storage bay. Tranny oil change and tranny air filter easy to get to but I find removing or loosening the lower plastic panels is best. These easily unclip. Remover the outer tranny cover noting where the bolts all go. You do not need any kind of puller. Remove the inner tranny case bolts, again noting where they all go as they are different in length. Using two long bolts of the correct thread size, you can wind them into the threaded holes in the tranny case to remove the case without problems. You just carefully wind them in a little each at a time and the case will/should come off easy. Note: Carefully note where all the bolts go on the inner tranny case, as they vary in size and if you get it wrong when you put them back you may do some damage. It's all largely self explainatory once you get going. My explainations here are not detailed as I'm rushing. I've a busy day. But come back if you need more detail and I and others will respond. There are several online YouTube videos by an excellent member (Micbergsma) who covers every service detail. Just do a search for Burgman 400 servicing 2007+. You'll see his videos. Good luck!
 

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BTW, you don't have to remove ANY tupperware to clean out the drive belt case and variator, change the final drive oil, or R&R the rear tire.

It takes me about half hour to open the final drive case and clean out belt dust. Once you are in there, the final drive oil change is easy. I use synthetic oil in the FD.

The metal cover for the belt case is removed by threading two metric bolts into the holes at the CLUTCH bell. It pops off and leaves the bearing on the clutch shaft.

Keep track of which cover bolt goes where, there are different lengths.

You need a way to hold the clutch and variator when you torque those 24mm (15/16 inch) nuts. Easy to rig something, or some of us have made home-grown tools. I would never use an impact gun to tighten those bolts.

The coolant flush, however, is a pain. Fortunately it occurs less frequently.
 

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If you're nearby, I'd help next time :)
My wife tells me I must be good for SOMETHING.
 

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This is all good advice here. The only thing to add is maybe you're doing too much. I understand this maybe for piece of mind, but consider a few things.

First is the v-belt and rollers, the concensous I've read here is that 14.5k miles for replacement is really quite low, the belts generally last 20k comfortably, and some have gone over 30k. I don't recommend that long, but i think you can go a lot longer than 7500 miles.

I replaced my spark plug at 35k miles, still looked good. I replaced my final drive oil at 39k (didn't know about it). Works fine. Did my first coolant change at 7 years. Temp never wavered. Just replaced my brake fluid for the first time after eight years. Always stopped on a dime. I've yet to do a valve inspection (46k). The engine Runs like a top.

I'm NOT saying don't do these things; my maintenance schedule boarders abusive. Just saying you don't need to attack all these things immediately. Do the oil, filter & coolant first, then try the others as you can get to them. Watch the videos, get a proper manual, read the posts here and get familiar with the bike. I think you'll find the tasks much less daunting once you're well informed and lord knows how much frustration you'll save doing the job right.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thank you all for the helpful information. Is there a consensus as to what is the best service manual to purchase? I have one concern. Mike1nw states "The metal cover for the belt case is removed by threading two metric bolts into the holes at the CLUTCH bell. It pops off and leaves the bearing on the clutch shaft." Now I could be wrong and often am, but I had the "bell" off. I shook, pried and wiggled it off. We managed to get the gear oil changed. My concern is that it seems to me I remember the bearing being held to the bell by a tab and screw. The tab extended from the bell over the bearing. That would hold the gearing to the bell. Am I remembering correctly. I'm old so forgive me if I'm wrong. :)

Edit: I checked the parts manual (see attached) and it would be 31 (the bearing lock tab) and 32 the screw to hold the tab, which in turn holds the bearing to the bell? I think. :) Now it seems to me there was a single hole in the middle, which makes me wonder. Could that single hole push the bell off and leave the bearing in the bell? (not on the shaft? Update by Suzuki?????
 

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Redwing, the bearing should always be in the tranny case, and held secure by the lock tabs and screws. Sometimes, if the bike hasn't been serviced correctly, the bearing tends to stick to the gearbox clutch shaft. It pulls out of the tranny case bending the lock tabs. Not a big deal but some folks just leave the bearing on the clutch shaft. I'm more of the opinion that it's best to take the bearing off the shaft and put it back where it should be. Best always to lightly grease the shaft that fits into that tranny case bearing with some wheel bearing grease or any hmp grease. Just a little is all that's needed so it doesn't stick next time. The tranny case should always just pull off without any undue strain if you do that. Not even any need for the use of the two bolts to get it off.
 

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It was referenced in post #2.
But the link you added makes it easier.
And I will agree that Mitch as some very helpful videos.
And some of the other videos are just entertaining.
 

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"It was referenced in post #2."
 

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Ooops. I might have gotten it (bearing) wrong here /\ It's been a while since I have done maintenance on my B400. Plus I do it automatically- So I will pay more attention next time. :oops:
Anyway, the first time I R&R the belt took HOURS. Now it's a half hour or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks guys for the info so far. I have to say Mitch's videos are among the most entertaining but informative I've seen. I watched as he removed the left side plastic. Seems like after all the fasteners were removed he pulled and ripped to get it off. The first thing that came to mind was "how in god's name did he get it back on?" He didn't show re installing but it seems like a very tough task. Did he take a shortcut and if you go "by the book" it is more time consuming but less wrestling? Also no one has made any recommendation for a service manual yet. Is there one better than the other?
Oh, another thought. I watched his coolant change video. He removed the lower radiator hose to drain the radiator and the corresponding hose high up on the engine. Seems to me that would drain the radiator and hose but not the coolant in the engine.
Thanks again...
 

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Mitch removes more of the panels than is strictly needed just so he can show more clearly the work involved. For normal servicing hardly anything has to come off. Also, once you know how the panels fit, they come off and go on very easily.

Regarding a service book. The owners manual tells you just about all you need for normal servicing. But the 'Haynes' workshop manual is a better read and is cheaper than the Suzuki workshop manual. I use the Haynes. But follow the Suzuki owners manual of how to check the engine oil, not the Suzuki workshop manual method.

The coolant change is fine the way Mitch does it. Remember to flush the engine with fresh water before refilling and make sure to get it all out before that refill.
 

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Hmm, Mech -- to flush the system with water some supercharger tool might be required which is not always available in home garages.
 
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