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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I have a stripped head in the retention screws of one of my brake calipers. Instead of spending $10 for the screw, I spent $16 and got a used unit on eBay; actually I bought both front calipers for $36. They're in perfect condition, so I think I'm just gonna install the replacements and toss the originals as the new ones seem in much better condition.

However, I've never replaced a caliper before. It seems simple enough to do, but are there any tricks? Should I fill it with brake fluid first, or just bleed fluid into it from the reservoir after I tighten the connecting screw? Should it be mounted before I bleed it, or is there a trick to get all the air out, such as turning it upside down? What do I lube the Pistons with? I have some silicon lube, is that okay?

Any help or videos would be appreciated.
 

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I am curious as to what you mean by retention screw? Are you referring to the pins that hold in the pads or something else? If you haven't done so already bleed the system prior to removing the hoses as there won't be enough vacuum to hold the fluid in the line's prior to removing the banjo fittings from the calipers. You don't want to put anything on the caliper pistons other than to prevent damaging the seals or contaminating the system later should it make it past the seals. Simply push them in and install the calipers on the bike prior to refilling the system. Channel locks work well for this task. The bleeder screws will be at the high point of the caliper in the installed position on the bike to enable getting the most air out while refilling so perform that task with them installed.

Another thing to note that should you strip a hole out in the future you can use a Helicoil as a repair for the threads. Just purchase the right size drill for the tap required for the Helicoil and drill and tap the hole. The helicoil can be installed using the tool or a small pair of long needlenose. Then just use a screw driver and a hammer to break off the tab in the bottom you screwed it in with.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Calipers installed!

It was not that difficult as they went on without a hitch. They're spongy as heck, however. My buddy has a brake bleeding tool and we'll get them properly blead next week. But these will do for now. It stops fine, just needs a little extra input.

And yes, I did mean the pins that hold in the pads. The pads were SHOT! I'm really surprised, cause my original oem pads lasted 37k. I bought Sintered pads thinking they're last longer and this is what they look like after 9k.

View attachment 40690

One is completely metal. The others have slivers of pad left.

I got a heck of a deal. Both calipers in good condition for $36 and they had practically new oem pads. It's $63 just for the pads from my research.

So it seems to have worked out well. Thanks for your help.
 

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Bleeding the brakes don't require anything special other than a wrench to open the bleeder valve while pulling in the brake lever until the system is pressurized and a catch basin for the fluid. In your case a clean one would be good to pour it back into the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Bleeding the brakes don't require anything special other than a wrench to open the bleeder valve while pulling in the brake lever until the system is pressurized and a catch basin for the fluid. In your case a clean one would be good to pour it back into the reservoir.
Agreed, but I lack even the tube to perform such a procedure. My buddy is in MC mechanics school and wants to do this for class credit.

This always seemed a good two man project. He was unavailable today to help with the caliper change, and obviously I needed the new pads. So I did it myself.

And hey, other than a ride, what's better than a couple of guys getting together doing mechanical stuff.

Ooo, don't answer that. Probably lots of things that don't involve anything referencing Millimeters. :D
 

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What brand were those worn pads?
 

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The old trick of tying the brake lever to the handlebar to keep the system pressured overnight makes the air bubbles raise to the reservoir and reduces the sponginess.
However, if the brake pistons don't move freely in and out, you will not get a good brake feel.
After installing braided brake lines and bleeding a quart of brake fluid, my front brake was still spongy, and I gave up and went to a professional, who told me he polished the brake pistons and applied special grease on them.
The result was excellent.
 
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