Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I posted earlier that I got a new 2011 Burgman 650 Executive. The dealer didn't put a manual in with the paperwork, and I can't find the owners manual on the bike.

I have to wait until Tuesday next week to get the owners manual that was supposed to be with the 650.

So, can any of you please help me with the operation of the transmission selector switches?

And, also, could someone please tell me how to adjust the mirrors?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
Don't know if the 650 is the same but the manual is often behind the carpet that lines the boot.
And the tools behind little clip on panels at the sides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
Transmission: D/M - after starting push yellow D/M button to switch between manual or automatic mode. Can be done at most any speed.

Orange paddle switch: press top of switch to shift up, bottom to shift down in manual mode while in motion. Note, will automatically shift down if you forget when coming to a stop.

Power button: increases engine rpm for a given speed allowing the engine to produce more horsepower. Also gives more engine braking when slowing. Only works in auto mode. Helps Harley riders see the back side of your scoot when leaving from a stop sign. :thumbup:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
Ralph M said:
Don't know if the 650 is the same but the manual is often behind the carpet that lines the boot.
And the tools behind little clip on panels at the sides.
Not applicable to 650.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
The tools, since another poster mentioned them, if you haven't found them already, are located under the seat in the fore section, in front of the stowage section almost beside the pneumatic arm for keeping the seat up when open. The battery compartment is located forward of that under a plastic cover. As for the M/D mode, is really simple in operation, but can take a little getting used to.

Essentially pressing the M/D button while the bike engine is running switches the transmission between complete auto mode, to partial auto mode - though it is referred to as Manual mode. When you have D mode selected gear selection is handled by the tranny automatically. M mode, which I referred to as partial auto mode means you get to select the gears by using the "UP" or "DOWN" selector paddles. You don't need to worry about throttling off when you move up or down, and if you try to select up or down in the gear range prematurely the tranny has a fail safe, that will over-ride your selection. It might take a little while trying it out, to figure out the right rev range that works best for various selections going up or down. I find the auto mode to work pretty well so tend to leave it there. YMMV. If you are travelling at speed, and swap between D to M mode, you may find that the revs increase slightly as the scoot drops down a gear depending on the speed being travelled at the time. It is something I have noticed on both my 2003 and 2007 executives.

A couple of things, I sometimes use the manual mode for are, where I have a long section of road ahead where I know I am not going to playing with the throttle and therefore revs, so I select manual mode simply so I can move the tranny up a gear to drop the revs and get a little more economy out of the engine/fuel. Another instance I sometimes use manual mode for is when I want to try and coast down some of the mountain roads (many mountain roads where I am). If I preselect manual mode "1" while stationary then allow the scoot to roll down the road the tranny will not engage and therefore it free-wheels as though the tranny is in neutral. I don't do it all the time. But no matter when I do it, I make sure to always have the engine running. Which is different than when I am riding one of my manual motorcycles, which I will sometimes ride and coast down the mountain roads without the bikes engine running. Going back to my Burgy, if I try to do the same coasting thing down a mountain road or any incline while in D mode, the clutch will engage as speed picks up. Choosing M mode over-rides this, as I say I don't do it all the time, as the thing about the tranny is it does provide quite good engine braking.

As already stated the "POWER" mode simply increases the revs that one is in, basically dropping down a gear. Great for increasing acceleration for passing and the like.

OH, and one last thing, this thread is useless without pictures of your scoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Some added info for you: The manual says to stay below 4K RPM for the first 600 miles and below 6K RPM for the next 600 miles. Also if I remember right the A after the 650 means that it is an Exec model and if so it does have folding mirrors, ABS, passanger backrest and up and down windshield adjustment. As far as the RPM requirments, 4K RPM does not sound like much but you can get up to 69 MPH on the scoot and still stay under 4K. When riding and you get your speed up to 50 or 55 MPH switch to manual mode and go into overdrive. Once in overdrive you can achive the 69 or 70 MPH and still be below 4K RPM.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for your help in understanding my Burgman 650...While I still haven't located the owner's manual, I did find the oil sight glass (oil level at high mark while on centerstand), and while installing the charging harness to the battery terminals, I located the tools (can't figure out what the 8"? long rubber armored metal cable with loops on each end)...maybe it's for the helmet holder or something.

Thanks also for the links to the knowledge database. I now know what weight oil to use, and which filters might crosswalk with the OEM filters. I wasn't able to locate the filter though. I don't have a lift, although, I suspect, that all of you that change your own oil probably don't use one. Depending on how difficult or easy it is to change the oil will determine whether I do it myself or drop it off at the dealer.

I'll figure out the controls as soon as the rain stops, and the pavement dries a little. Thanks Jim for explaining the operation/function of the auto vs semi-auto transmission selector. As for the transmission, I'll probably just keep it in the regular auto mode (D, right?), keeping everything as simple as possible while starting out on my new bike.

I need to adjust the mirrors, but when applying gentle pressure on the edges of the mirror glass, the things just aren't moving. That's why I'm asking about it here...I don't want to damage the mirror material.

There's probably a good, reasonable explanation for the switch that folds the mirrors, but could someone tell me what function it serves?

Thanks again for all your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
8 in. steel line, use like this, 2011 much same like this.

Open seat find metal hook left side over 2 x 40 A fuse.

2011 similar to 2013 picture post here, prevent helmet get steal.

Click picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Tried to edit my post above last night (my time) but timed out. So repeating it here with some additions and parts edited.

The tools, since another poster mentioned them, if you haven't found them already, are located under the seat in the fore section, in front of the stowage section almost beside the pneumatic arm for keeping the seat up when open. The battery compartment is located forward of that under a plastic cover. As for the M/D mode, is really simple in operation, but can take a little getting used to. The 8" steel cable is for securing a helmet through its D ring. Simply attach the cable to the hook beside the "CVT" and "MAIN" fuses to the left side cut out under the seat. As for mirrors, if you have the exec model, then the mirrors can be electronically folded in/out using the blue switch on the topside of the left hand switchgear near the rear brake master-cylinder reservoir. Very handy for lane splitting or other tight spots. I also tend to fold my mirrors in when parking in my garage or when parking out and about as the mirrors stick out a little and might prove fair game for someone so inclined. As for moving the mirror itself to get a differing view of what's behind, press against the mirror glass near its edges with a little force/pressure to change the glass angle. If this doesn't work go back to the dealer.

Essentially pressing the M/D button while the bike engine is running switches the transmission between complete "D"rive (Auto) mode, to "M"anual (partial auto) mode - though it is referred to as "Manual" mode. When you have D mode selected gear selection is handled by the tranny automatically. M mode, which I referred to as partial auto mode means you get to select the gears by using the "UP" or "DOWN" selector paddles. You don't need to worry about throttling off when you move up or down, and if you try to select up or down in the gear range prematurely the tranny has a fail safe, that will over-ride your selection. It might take a little while trying it out, to figure out the right rev range that works best for various selections going up or down. I find the auto mode to work pretty well so tend to leave it there. YMMV. If you are travelling at speed, and swap between D to M mode, you may find that the revs increase slightly as the scoot drops down a gear depending on the speed being travelled at the time. It is something I have noticed on both my 2003 and 2007 executives.

A couple of things, I sometimes use the manual mode for are, where I have a long section of road ahead where I know I am not going to playing with the throttle and therefore revs, so I select manual mode simply so I can move the tranny up a gear to drop the revs and get a little more economy out of the engine/fuel. Another instance I sometimes use manual mode for is when I want to try and coast down some of the mountain roads (many mountain roads where I am). If I preselect manual mode "1" while stationary then allow the scoot to roll down the road the tranny will not engage and therefore it free-wheels as though the tranny is in neutral. I don't do it all the time. But no matter when I do it, I make sure to always have the engine running. Which is different than when I am riding one of my manual motorcycles, which I will sometimes ride and coast down the mountain roads without the bikes engine running. Going back to my Burgy, if I try to do the same coasting thing down a mountain road or any incline while in D mode, the clutch will engage as speed picks up. Choosing M mode over-rides this, as I say I don't do it all the time, as the thing about the tranny is it does provide quite good engine braking.

As already stated the "POWER" mode simply increases the revs that one is in, basically dropping down a gear. Great for increasing acceleration for passing and the like.

The oil filter can be viewed either from underneath the scoot, hunker down and look under the left side foot rail tupperware. You can also remove the engine cover access panel, remove the single PK/Phillips screw from the tunnel panel (in front of the seat where'd you'd likely swing your legs through when getting on/off the bike. Then follow the line of the engine access panel down from nearest the screw down each side to the foot floor boards, you will find that there is a recess on each side, where you can place your fingers to "pop" the cover to detach it, Once the cover has been popped out from those two locations either side, you have to manipulate the cover away sliding and wiggling it out. Kind of hard to explain it. Another great resource you might appreciate aside from the Knowledge Base (KB) - look near the top of your browser window on this website for the KB link, is LeDudes Burgman Resource Centre if you haven't found it already. sites.google.com/site/testburgmancenter02/

Oh, and one last thing, this thread is useless without pictures of your scoot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,232 Posts
On adjusting the mirrors. Best way is to put a thumb in the corner of the mirror you need it to move in and push. It will take a lot of force to get them moving but once you get them where you want them they will stay. I set mine when I bought the bike Feb, 2007. Have not moved them since and they still are right where I set them.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,067 Posts
scooterkal said:
I wasn't able to locate the filter though. I don't have a lift, although, I suspect, that all of you that change your own oil probably don't use one. Depending on how difficult or easy it is to change the oil will determine whether I do it myself or drop it off at the dealer.
This should fix that :D

Oil change with Pics(Long) for AN650
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Sorry for the late reply... I was checking the other thread I started here, a thread that basically asked similar questions, and evolved into a discussion of alternatives for increased storage. Before I got my 650 Burgman, I owned a 400. Shortly after I started riding the 400, I put on a Givi AF266 shield, and began enjoying my first "scooter". I was having a lot of fun with that Burgman, but within 1600 miles, I realized I should have purchased the 650...the 400 was an excellent ride, but for me I wanted a bit more weight which would give me the more solid, secure feeling that I had become used to with most of the cruiser-style bikes that I owned for the past 16 years.

The easy handling Burgman 400, with its simplicity, abundant built-in storage, excellent mileage, and reliability that made worrying about repairs mostly unnecessary, was just a little on the light-weight side for me, and now with the Burgman 650, I'm experiencing all of the positive features of the 400, but in a slightly heavier package. It's strictly a matter of my personal taste, and I'll probably miss the nimble-handling 400 some day (when my back degenerates further from the surgery I had last year), but if that happens, and I'm still able to ride, I'll look into a Yelvington trike kit for the 650.

This forum is an invaluable asset to the community of "scooter" riders...an abundance of printed information available, and more importantly, the personal help and advice that's made available by all of you, just for the asking.

I picked up the owners manual for my Burgman last Tuesday, and I realized that the information in the manual is also available on this forum, with additional hints, tips, and descriptions not included in the manual.

On Wednesday, I was dusting off my new Burgman getting ready for the "photo shoot", and with the bright sunlight, I noticed a small (1/2") crack in the finish of one of the rear panels. I didn't want to poke around to see how deep the crack was, and am trying to decide whether or not to return to the dealer to get them to replace the panel. I don't know much about the properties of the ABS? panels on the Burgmans, or whether a small crack in one of them would grow with time.

Thanks again for being here, and I promise to get a couple of pictures on here soon :cheers: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Don't mess with the crack, take it to the dealer and let them replace the cracked panel. New scooter so should be no cost to you.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
+1 on what Bill wrote ^
It is quite possible that with vibration however minute will likely extend the split/crack. The only was to stop that is drill a small hole at its end to stop it travelling any further. I'd be back to the dealer, after a complimentary advisory call first to give them a polite heads up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I took my Burgman back to the dealer service department. The service person looked at the crack, and said he thought it was a deep scratch. I told him that I just bought the bike and I wanted it to keep looking good well into my ownership of the Burgman 650. He agreed, and said that he'd contact Suzuki about replacing the panel,

So, I'll wait until Suzuki and the dealer have a chance to talk (after Christmas). I agree that the panel should be replaced, because, as you have mentioned, the little crack might grow with vibration and temp changes over time.

I've got a Givi E460 and the E529 mounting plate on order from Kiwi Dave, but it looks like the mounting plate is out of stock, and pricing for the new year isn't available yet. The pricing thing doesn't bother me much, but waiting the 3-4 weeks to have the stuff delivered might be a problem.

I'm really thinking about ordering one of the Bestem cases, if I can find mounting hardware that is solid. The pricing is another really big plus for the Bestem, although I've had a Givi case on the 400 I traded for the 650, and have to admit that the quality of the Givi (in my limited experience), was really good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
842 Posts
scooterkal said:
I took my Burgman back to the dealer service department. The service person looked at the crack, and said he thought it was a deep scratch. I told him that I just bought the bike and I wanted it to keep looking good well into my ownership of the Burgman 650. He agreed, and said that he'd contact Suzuki about replacing the panel,

So, I'll wait until Suzuki and the dealer have a chance to talk (after Christmas). I agree that the panel should be replaced, because, as you have mentioned, the little crack might grow with vibration and temp changes over time.

I've got a Givi E460 and the E529 mounting plate on order from Kiwi Dave, but it looks like the mounting plate is out of stock, and pricing for the new year isn't available yet. The pricing thing doesn't bother me much, but waiting the 3-4 weeks to have the stuff delivered might be a problem.

I'm really thinking about ordering one of the Bestem cases, if I can find mounting hardware that is solid. The pricing is another really big plus for the Bestem, although I've had a Givi case on the 400 I traded for the 650, and have to admit that the quality of the Givi (in my limited experience), was really good.
Buy the box from Kiwi dave . get the rack here..If your buying Monokey .... http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/givi ... urgman-650
BAM..Your done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
902 Posts
Speaking as a Bestem user, who has previously used Givi, the quality difference is marked.

Personally, I think the difference in cost makes the bestem better value for money for my requirements, but that doesn't mean it would be for you.

The only criticism I've ever had of Givi cases is the quality of the keys. As I had a 3-box system with all having the same lock, I had six of them to begin with, so if each only lasted about a year, it wasn't a huge issue........I still had three left when I sold the bike with them!

With the Bestems......you get what you pay for, 'nuff said.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top