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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today I got a new appreciation for my 650. Winds were called for gusts over 30mph. A friend of mine on a 650 VStrom asked me to ride with him to a business approx 20 miles away. I had such a ball that when leaving the business he asked me to lead so lead I did. Took approx 50 miles to get back to his house.

He said he had gotten beaten pretty bad while "I had a ball, the wind was a hoot!" I left his house and took off cross country, enjoying the winds blowing off the nice flat fields broken by occasional stand of trees or buildings. It seemed the 650 automatically corrected for the cross winds and even in a couple turns where a gust would suddenly hit full force it took it very well. Approx 30 miles was interstate highway and the electronic cruise set at 75mph.

I was pleasantly surprised and after what my friend said about his VStrom I am now sold on the Burgman 650 more then ever. He has 50 years, on bike number 40, and several 100 thousand miles, I got 4 years and 40,000+ miles on only Burgman 650. When I got home after putting on over 120 miles today I had the biggest, dumbest grin on my face. I wonder if I can wash it off tonite before bed. Should I tell my friend lest he think I've totally lost my mind?
 

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Again one more thing that make 650 fantastic ride and great bike.
 

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Well the snow bank, and all the ice melted away from my bikes garage door this weekend! I backed her out and took my first ride of the year. This is the first year I could not ride in the winter. The Burgman purred like a big kitten. I just wish it didn't think 77 is the best cruising speed. I think 87 feels the best, but Mr PoPo seems to think 57 is the right speed. I have to work at not falling asleep at 57, so he can't be right.
I just looked in the mirror and I have that stupid grin on my face. Could be worse, I could look like me.
 

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Yes the Po Po is very consistent on that fact. But in Missouri on I 70 I got the chance to put my 650 in manual and 6th gear, It was like an overdrive. When I got it back to 5500 rpm I was running 95 mph and cutting thru the air better than I do at 70 mph.
 

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I have ridden bikes that will do 180, but I have never ridden anything that felt so safe at 95. The wind is not trying to tear you off. The front forks do not fully extend so the steering feels normal. You could smoke a pipe and eat a snack if you wanted to.
 

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But in Missouri on I 70 I got the chance to put my 650 in manual and 6th gear, It was like an overdrive.
Well actually, there is a good reason for that. 6th gear is an overdrive and even tells you that on the older 650's giving you a green "OD" light instead of a "6".

And yes indeed- I do like engaging it when running over 60 mph or so. The engine feels like it is loafing along at 70 MPH mainly because that is exactly what it is doing.

Just yet another thing to love about a 650 Burgman!
 

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I've found that as the rider I get more pushed around by wind than the bike ever feels like. They are wonderful bikes for sure.
 

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but I have never ridden anything that felt so safe at 95. The wind is not trying to tear you off. The front forks do not fully extend so the steering feels normal. You could smoke a pipe and eat a snack if you wanted to.
The only bike I'd rank above the Burgman 650 is the ST1100 with the touring screen.
The bubble of no turbulence is astounding at high speeds.
I prefer the handling on the Burgman 650 tho.

The only times I've gotten off the road due to wind were both severe TStorms with twisters near by.

The only time I've been shake by wind to the point of the WTF was a vortex off the back of a double trailer.

All of us in the group were shaken up and got the **** out of the wind shadow of that thing, felt like someone whacked me with a mattress at 80 mph.

One time was funny - high pressure day and the bike felt very sluggish to the point I turned around and went back to check it.

The wind was just steady and heavy and was simply slowing the Burgman down as if tires were in tar or something.
Very weird....no turbulence just pressure.
 

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Well actually, there is a good reason for that. 6th gear is an overdrive and even tells you that on the older 650's giving you a green "OD" light instead of a "6".

And yes indeed- I do like engaging it when running over 60 mph or so. The engine feels like it is loafing along at 70 MPH mainly because that is exactly what it is doing.

Just yet another thing to love about a 650 Burgman!

You have to wonder why it is not used all the time. Why only in manual? It would raise the gas mileage and only take less than a second to drop down if more power was needed. (I just had to use these guys for something and I thought this was the day.):thin::whdat:
 

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Actually, the bike does use "OD" (also known as the tallest pulley ratio that the ECVT provides) whenever it calculates that to be the optimal setting -- which it usually isn't. It just doesn't light up the "OD" light when it does this.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You have to wonder why it is not used all the time. Why only in manual? It would raise the gas mileage and only take less than a second to drop down if more power was needed. (I just had to use these guys for something and I thought this was the day.):thin::whdat:
My experience has been that overdrive keeps the engine at a slower speed but I have never seen an increase in mpg. It still requires the same horsepower to move it so apparently the engine runs mostly in its most efficient pounds per horsepower hour range even in automatic.
 

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My experience has been that overdrive keeps the engine at a slower speed but I have never seen an increase in mpg. It still requires the same horsepower to move it so apparently the engine runs mostly in its most efficient pounds per horsepower hour range even in automatic.
I found the same. Also, I'm reluctant to keep it in one gear for a long time. With in in automatic, the belt constantly moves around on the pulley. Will the belt make a groove if it is constantly in the same spot on the pulley? I don't want to find out.
 

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Will the belt make a groove if it is constantly in the same spot on the pulley?
Probably not even after 100 years. The belt and aluminum H blocks that make it up are softer than the pulleys.
 

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You have to wonder why it is not used all the time. Why only in manual? It would raise the gas mileage and only take less than a second to drop down if more power was needed. (I just had to use these guys for something and I thought this was the day.):thin::whdat:


Because most 650 owner have so much fun with 650 they ride extra 20-30-40-50 mile to ride twisty road, mountain and back road so do not use 6th or overdrive in such case. :D :happy8: :)
 

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In 'Auto' mode if the scoot gets up to around 100-105km/h+ - the scoot (AN650K5 onwards) will engage OD or 6th 'gear' so long as the 'revs' are constant e.g. scoot is not accelerating. I've found that when I've been riding my K7 fast enough and at a constant speed/revs e.g. 100km/h+ and I put the scoot into 'Manual' mode the revs instantly increase by approximately 500 RPM, and this is also heard. Once in 'Manual' mode if I toggle up to 'OD' the RPM's drop by about the same amount e.g. -500 RPM and the engine sounds the same as before I engaged 'Manual' mode. There are times though where I'm just riding at a constant 70km/h+ where I engage Manual mode just so that I can have the scoot in OD...

I've found though that the petrol saving between the K7 and the new L4 has not been all that significant despite my trying to use the 'Eco - mode', though this will likely change as the L4 accrues more mileage over time and the scoots engine loosens up. Another observation is that the underseat storage of the L4 is not as wide 'across' as it is on the older scoots...I could place my Thinkpad T530 15.4", width ways across in the underseat storage and it would fit in my K4 and K7, but not so in the L4. The L4's underseat storage is about ~10mm narrower.
 

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The K3/K4 are doing that too, they just don't have the "OD" light or an option to select it in manual mode. My guess is that at first, Suzuki's engineers figured anyone wanting to use manual mode was looking for more performance rather than lower RPMs, and added "OD" as a feature when they revised the ECVT controller.

My main use for it is to "lock out" the engine braking to allow me to rest my throttle hand for a few moments. Otherwise, I just let the ECVT do its thing.
 

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The K3/K4 are doing that too, they just don't have the "OD" light or an option to select it in manual mode. My guess is that at first, Suzuki's engineers figured anyone wanting to use manual mode was looking for more performance rather than lower RPMs, and added "OD" as a feature when they revised the ECVT controller.

My main use for it is to "lock out" the engine braking to allow me to rest my throttle hand for a few moments. Otherwise, I just let the ECVT do its thing.
I doubt that is the case on the K3/K4 models, as I had one until about a month ago. When I rode the K4 versus my K7 executive then compared the speed with the RPMs between both scoots, it was pretty obvious to me at least that there was no OD in the K4. The RPMs at any given constant speed on the K4 were pretty much identical to my K7 in 5th 'gear'. For sure when in Manual mode on the K4 model, there was no ability to manually change into OD. Just didn't happen. Also applying the manual versus auto mode at speeds in excess of 100km/h there was no difference in the RPMs nor sound between either mode on the K4, which differs from the K7 and now L4. This to my mind helped confirm the non-existence on the OD in the K3 and K4 models.

Check this link half way down under Manual Mode...
http://burgmanusa.com/bkb/650+CVT+Info

Detail about the CVT...
http://www.mate.tue.nl/mate/pdfs/10396.pdf
 

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The only bike I'd rank above the Burgman 650 is the ST1100 with the touring screen.
The bubble of no turbulence is astounding at high speeds.
I prefer the handling on the Burgman 650 tho.

The only times I've gotten off the road due to wind were both severe TStorms with twisters near by.

The only time I've been shake by wind to the point of the WTF was a vortex off the back of a double trailer.

All of us in the group were shaken up and got the **** out of the wind shadow of that thing, felt like someone whacked me with a mattress at 80 mph.

One time was funny - high pressure day and the bike felt very sluggish to the point I turned around and went back to check it.

The wind was just steady and heavy and was simply slowing the Burgman down as if tires were in tar or something.
Very weird....no turbulence just pressure.
I was behind a turnpike double (two 48' trailers) last week. I don't want to say the turbulence was bad, but it almost pushed me into the next lane.

And I was in a CAR! :( Yeah, that was bad!
 

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My experience has been that overdrive keeps the engine at a slower speed but I have never seen an increase in mpg. It still requires the same horsepower to move it so apparently the engine runs mostly in its most efficient pounds per horsepower hour range even in automatic.
Low RPM and wide throttle opening is (usually) more efficient than higher RPMs and narrow throttle opening. (That's why so many cars now have super-tall double or even triple-overdrive trans gearing.)
 
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