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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I'm brand new to the motorcycle/scooter scene. I've never ridden before & haven't the slightest idea on how to go about this.

So, here's my story:
Originally I was looking at getting an old Goldwing (86-89). They can be had for good prices & in good condition. After more research I found that they get only 5-7 miles per gallon more than my Saab. Seeing that defeats a major reason I wanted a bike, I looked elsewhere. Next was the Silverwing, but after reading more about the "super-scoots" I found out about the Burgman. Now after lurking here for a few hours, I'm sold.

The only problem is, I'm clueless on how to ride one. :D

How should I go about this? Should I be taking motorcycle classes somewhere before I go to the dealership to look at a Burgman? What kind of classes would I need, and where can I take them?

Thanks in advance for your help!
 

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I HIGHLY advise taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Beginner Rider Course. It will teach you the basic skills required to safely ride a motorcycle. In addiation, most insurance companies offer a discount (10%) on your bikes insurance and most states do not require you to take the written or riding tests (vision test is still often required) to get your motorcycle license if you present your certificate showing you passed the course. Check with your local DMV to verifiy your states acceptance of the MSF BRC certificate in place of testing.

Although some of the skills taught do not apply to scooters (clutch, gears, footbrake), the BRC course does teach all the fundimentals of scooter riding. The transition from motorcycle to scooter is an easy one. Any rider (even those who have been riding for years) learn something new when taking the course.

For more information, see :
http://msf-usa.org/
 

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Bill pretty much said it all. The MSF course is a must for someone in your situation with no riding experience whatsoever.

The other thing that I would suggest since you're possibly looking for a bike or scooter. The 650 Burgman would probably be the largest displacement machine I would reccomend you get. If you end up buying a used machine and get a bike that falls under the sportbike category then I suggest no more than 500 cc displacements. Maybe you could tell us a bit more of what kind of riding you intend to do. Is it just for commuting in the city? A few weekend excursions? Riding solo or with a passenger ( passenger riding not reccommended for 1st yr riders) If we know what your intentions are then collectively as group I'm sure we could supply some useful info to get you into the two wheel world.
Good Luck!

Oh and welcome to the forum :wave: glad you finally stopped lurking :lurk:
 

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One other thought...

You will want to test drive any scooter before buying. I have yet to see a dealer let you test drive if you do not have the proper license.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses.

My plan for usage of the vehicle would be as a replacement for my car in the warmer months. Mostly commuting to and from work, but often travelling around the city as well.

Being 6'1" & 275# I figured that the 650 would be a much more sensible choice especially since I would eventually like to do some 2up riding. I also plan on taking it out on the freeway regularly, so stability & comfort at speed were a consideration.

I realized that the monsterous goldwing was really intimidating & probably not the bike to begin on, but I still wanted the comfort & the cruisability. The Burgman seemed like the perfect middleground. Plus, being a Saab owner, I'm all for owning something slightly "left of center" :lol:.

As far as the classes & testing go. Here in WI, will I be able to use the testing from the MSF BRC to get a license? The reason I ask is, without owning a motorcycle, it would be awful hard to go to the DMV & test. But, without a license, it will be hard to buy a motorcycle. <boggle> I tried looking their their PDF file of state requirements, but found the charts a little tough to decypher.

Thanks again for the help!
 

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I'm in complete agreement with the previous posts. TAKE THE TRAINING COURSE! You will learn as much in that 18 hours (more or less) as trying to learn on your own in 2 years and you will be doing it in a much safer environment.
The course will provide the bike (and usually a helmet) and you will be taught by trained instructors. And, you will have the opportunity to learn whether or not you even like the sport without the expense of buying a bike first.
Check with your DMV or your state's M/C safety program as to whether or not you will receive your license at the completion of the course. If not, some state programs have arrangements that will allow you to use their bikes to take DMV tests.
Good luck and welcome to the best sport in the world! You'll meet the best people on motorcycles and this forum. :D
 

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Bjaardker said:
As far as the classes & testing go. Here in WI, will I be able to use the testing from the MSF BRC to get a license? The reason I ask is, without owning a motorcycle, it would be awful hard to go to the DMV & test. But, without a license, it will be hard to buy a motorcycle. <boggle> I tried looking their their PDF file of state requirements, but found the charts a little tough to decypher.
See:

http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/drivers/dr ... torcyc.htm
 

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Just another voice in full agreement with all that has been said..
Don't even think of ways around taking the course----just do it !
As far as the 650 goes I would agree with you even though I am heavy also
I have a 400 which does highway speeds very well, but two up (after you know what your doing) you may need the 650.. :)
 

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Bjaardker said:
Next was the Silverwing, but after reading more about the "super-scoots" I found out about the Burgman. Now after lurking here for a few hours, I'm sold.

The only problem is, I'm clueless on how to ride one. :D

How should I go about this?

Take 'er out on the open road and ride 'er like you stole 'er!!!!

j/k, you know what to do. What they said.




Peace.
 

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My turn:

First of all - good choice! If I were just getting into motorcycling today, I couldn't have picked a better start.

In all likelihood, all the MSF courses in your area are filled. While I, like the others feel that this course is invaluable to your future, I don't believe that not taking it right away would mean certain death. Do you ride a bicycle? Riding the Burgman is an awful lot like riding a bicycle - it's just a lot heavier (and you don't have to pedal). Buy the bike and a helmet, and then promise yourself that you won't get on the bike without the helmet. Find a friend that you trust who rides (actually, you're more likely to get good advice from an experienced female rider, if you can find one) and do what he/she says. Do not fear. You'll be fine.

Keep your head. If you feel you might be getting in over your head at any point, slow down. Practice the basics on an empty lot. You'll be ready before you know it.

Good luck!
 

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wasions said:
My turn:



Keep your head. If you feel you might be getting in over your head at any point, slow down. Practice the basics on an empty lot. You'll be ready before you know it.

Good luck!
From a unicycle rider, you can take that advice to the bank.
 

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One other item you should consider whether you take the MSF course or not (and you should).
Get a copy of David Hough's Proficient Motorcycling, it is a good learning tool.
Remember it may be a scooter but it is still a full fledge motorcycle. :wink:
 
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