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Discussion Starter #1
:?: Hello! I am considering buying a 650 and would appreciate input
from as many 650 owners as possible. I'd like to know how well (or not)
the 650 handles things like loose gravel,railroad tracks,(Very) steep grades and gusty winds. I'm also curious if anyone has had any serious
or on-going mechanical problems. I have heard that the 650 is a very
problem-prone machine that is difficult to work on, expensive to have
professionally serviced, and that most mechanics just don't know their
way around a Burgman. And if there are any San Francisco Bay Area
owners reading this, How much for the insurance on this bike? Thank you all for your time and attention.
 

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Handeling: Excellent

Crosswinds: very good due to the low center of gravity

RR X-ings: very good (tires are very good and wide)

Rain: Very good seems very sure footed

Gravel: don't know

Steep grades: Plenty of power for 2 up riding up hill. Riding the twisties is very relaxing with out having to deal with the constant shifting.

The Transmission: Excellent you really don't need the manual mode, the power button is nice (this allows higher RPM)

Noisy @ Idle when warmed up It's there (sound like a deisel) at least on my bike. I'm not real worried about it, as with any new product, there are somethimes bugs to work out, and Suzuki seems to be taking care of it, if requested. So far I'm living with the deiseling noise and maybe get it taken care of in Sept. before the warrenty is out.
It has had NO effect on reliablity or performance' at least not on my 650.

Maintance I do my own, as do must other riders. Shop rates anywhere aren't cheap. If it's the 1st. time anyone works on a Burgman, they will try to have you pay for their education.

Insurance: there are rates on other posts in this forum, Wisc. 51 yrs Good coverage (not the cheapest) $118.00 per Yr.
 

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Darknightryder77 said:
:?: Hello! I am considering buying a 650 and would appreciate input
from as many 650 owners as possible. I'd like to know how well (or not)
the 650 handles things like loose gravel,railroad tracks,(Very) steep grades and gusty winds. I'm also curious if anyone has had any serious
or on-going mechanical problems. I have heard that the 650 is a very
problem-prone machine that is difficult to work on, expensive to have
professionally serviced, and that most mechanics just don't know their
way around a Burgman. And if there are any San Francisco Bay Area
owners reading this, How much for the insurance on this bike? Thank you all for your time and attention.
Jim pretty well hit it bang on with his previous post. As far as gravel goes it's better than the sportbikes on gravel in my opinion due the lower center of gravity and the power comes on so smooth. With that said reduced speeds are the norm for these conditions. Just yesterday I had to go through a deep sandy section (1-2" deep) and I kept both feet to the side just incase. Didn't need them there though as the machine handled it well.

As far as maintenance:
Since the Burgman was new last year the mechanics are not familiar with it and are using the shop manuals to learn and it takes them longer to perform maintenance. Alot of people(myself included) have purchased the shop manuals and do the work ourselves after the first initial 600m service. It's not that hard to work on once you've done it the first time.

As far as being problem prone I havent seen it or heard of it on this forum. We have alot of people who lots of happy miles with no problems.
The Honda Siverwing has had recalls and problems, maybe your getting the 2 confused.
 

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Its the valves

This machine is electronic everything, no points no carb, just plugs, oil, filter, other lubes.

So there is no tuning like yesteryears bikes. Its the valve adjustment that sucks. Direct actuated camshafts using shims under bucket. Some Burgies, like other Suzukis (GS1000 family) will NEVER need a valve adjustment. Some will develop a slight barely audible tick when cold, and that adjustment is optional. Some will really need an adjustment after like 20k, and this will require removal of the cam and shims to be adjusted. I know mechanics that did this on my Suzy GS1300 tourer. It took all day.

For Burgies that do need a valve adjustment, it will be the first and last it ever needs, if it is done right the first time.

I cant think of one retail motorcycle dearler's service dept. that actually wants to do this, no matter how much you pay, or that is set up to do this.

Have you seen today's shops? some dont even have basic test equipment.

Im gonna tell you how to do this right.







THey dont have the time and patience to do it right. THey cant even service easy bikes right.
 

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Darknightryder77 said:
:?: Hello! I am considering buying a 650 and would appreciate input
from as many 650 owners as possible. I'd like to know how well (or not)
the 650 handles things like loose gravel,railroad tracks,(Very) steep grades and gusty winds. I'm also curious if anyone has had any serious
or on-going mechanical problems. I have heard that the 650 is a very
problem-prone machine that is difficult to work on, expensive to have
professionally serviced, and that most mechanics just don't know their
way around a Burgman. And if there are any San Francisco Bay Area
owners reading this, How much for the insurance on this bike? Thank you all for your time and attention.
I've owned about 20 motorcycles. The Burgman 650 is the most stable machine in crosswinds that I've every owned. I live in Nebraska, which is almost always windy.

Anyone who told you this is a problem prone machine knows nothing about it. I've put 5000 miles on mine, and I've been monitoring forums since I bought it. I've seen no serious problems reported. Suzuki will provide a fix for that "diesel sound at idle" issue under warranty - I had mine done a few weeks ago. But they also state that it won't cause any harm if you leave it as is. That is the only common issue that I know of with the 650, and it is not a serious one.

Rural roads out here often start out paved, then turn to gravel at some point. I was riding a nice twisty road at about 70 mph last fall. Went over a bridge - oops, I was suddenly flying over gravel at high speed. No drama at all. I just got off the throttle, let the machine slow down some, braked to a stop, turned around and rode back to pavement. It felt fine on the gravel road, but I had just washed it and didn't want to get it all dusty.

Any machine that is fully enclosed in plastic panels is going to be more difficult to work on than a naked bike, because for some maintenance, panels need to be removed to access what you are after. Most contemporary touring and sport touring motorcycles fall into this category.
The trade offs are that it is easier to clean up, and you have better protection from the elements (weather).

Plenty of power for steep grades - and you just push the "Power" button if you want some more omph - or go into manual mode. The CVT automatic on this machine is so good though, that I rarely find it necessary to use those options.

Railroad tracks. We have lots of those out here, and some of the crossings are not in great shape. I do slow down for them on the scooter more than I do on my motorcycle - the difference in wheel diameters requires that.

The "experienced mechanic" issue can be valid. Some dealers are still ignoring these machines, others are quite good with them. Before I bought mine, I checked to see if the dealer's service department had a Burgman 650 service manual on the shelf. They did, so I went ahead and purchased it there. I also saw other super-scooters on their floor (both Suzuki & Honda). These are both good indicators.

Insurance for the Burgman is less than half of what I pay for my V-Strom motorcycle. Your rates will probably be higher in the SF area, but the Scooter should still be much less to insure than a motorcycle. Shop around. Rates vary wildly between different companies.

Since I bought the Burgman 650, I ride it much more frequently than I ride my 1000cc V-Strom motorcycle. I enjoy it a lot.
 

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I have had mine now for about 370 miles. This ride is a joy. I can't say too much more than has already been stated.

Some posts have discussed that wind buffeting improves with an after market windshield. The stock shield does a fair job, but i do get a lot of air at the top of the helmet and around the shoulders. A Clearview is in my future.

I doubt anyone here that already owns the Burger, either 400 or 650 regrets the purchase.

Just do the homework. If you buy a Burger....welcome to the club
 

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I bought my 2004 AN650 on Feb 16 with the help members on this site and the yahoo site.

I have now close to 1600 trouble free miles. I've owned many bikes and never put that kind of milage in so short period of time, That's because I use it for everthing. Finally I'm gonna get my monies worth out of a Bike.

I wonder who would tell you that the burg is a "problem-prone machine"
...maybe a Honda Salesman?

IMO the Burgman has NO personality because it's perfect in many ways. :wink:
 

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What a machine

This 650 is as close to an ideal solo purpose built touring machine as I have owned or seen. I tracks the highway like a freight train, it carves the corners like a ducati, and it has a built in espresso maker and sushi chef.

What more could you want? And automatic transmission? A trunk under the seat?
 
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