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Discussion Starter #1
Well,
On my way home from a weeklong meeting, I stopped off at the DMV to get my M/C temp permit. Missed one question. (question was which cycle position was in the more dangerous position. I picked the M/C that was being tailgated instead of the M/C that was beside the car that was doing the tailgaiting of the former M/C)

So, when I got home, I took my bike out for the first big spin of its life. Took it out for about 3 miles on a few little jonts to just get the initial feel of the bike. It feels heavy at idle but very nimble and agile underway.

My first experience told me that there is a reason why so many people are getting replacement windshields. There is a tremendous amount of wind directed onto the hands. Since I was just going out for a little jont, I did not take my gloves with me. My hands got cold.

Also, a difference between this bike and the Honda Helix is that I see over the Burgman's windshield by about 3 inches where I looked through the Helix's. Had quite a bit of wind sheer on the head. I would like look into getting a taller and bigger windshield, and one that will cover the hands from the wind.

Noticed an extinsive friction plate usage. I almost have to maintain a throttle when coming up to a stop. The Helix almost coasted when throttle was released. I need to learn that brake/foot timing maneuver.

As others have noted, this bike is very nimble. It really likes to take corners and lean. I found it very stable and easy to control.

I must say, that I am loving this bike more than when I bought the bike. What else is there to say. I can't wait for summer time!!

Found out that the trunk can hold my laptop and its case, but not much else. If I were of the need to carry luggage, I would have to take the clothes out of my bag and stuff it around my laptop. I saw a plastic box at wally world the other day that would fit on the passenger seat of the burgman. I could use it to put my luggage into during my trips to meetings, I guess. Any thoughts?

Did I say I love this bike?
Did I say I also want a bigger windshield?
 

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Congrats on passing the test, and on your first ride.

Please do wear gloves all the time, though. It's not just for weather protection, but also for protection from flying debris and bugs, and to protect your skin in case of a fall. Even on a short jaunt around the block it's important to wear the right gear.
 

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It is always interesting to see first impressions. I'll say this. The first few miles I put on my 650 felt awkward. There is the hand brake vs foot brake to get used to (for ex motorcycle riders like me). The engine braking from the ecvt transmission also takes getting used to, particularly when coming to a stop - and you have that little lurch forward when the clutch disengages. Learning to appropriately feather the throttle and to have a bit of brake applied at the point where the clutch disengages takes care of that, but it takes a few rides to figure that out. I became completely comfortable with the machine within the first 300 miles or so of riding though. It is not a typical motorcycle, nor is it a Helix - so there are some minor adaptations in riding technique required, particularly at low speeds.
 

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In addition to protection from the elements, the most important reason to ALWAYS wear gloves is protection from asphalt/concrete/gravel, etc. When you fall (and you will), the normal reflex action is protective extension with the hands and fingers making first contact with whatever you are going to hit. Even light gloves provide much more protection than nothing at all, but you should select gloves with abrasion protection in mind.
Of even greater concern is post-injury repair and recovery. It is important to prevent hand injury, as they are the most difficult and complicated parts of the body to repair/restore.
The best injury is no injury. Gloves are a first line of injury prevention.
Although it is not a factor on your Burgman, some gloves are also designed to reduce the effects of handlebar vibration that can cause loss of sensation in the hands/fingers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very True.

I delayed safety considerations for the sake of taking the bike out for a few miles around the neighborhood. HEY, at least I wore my helmet. hehehee (my kid was watching).....

I know, old habits.....

Speaking of old habits.... I found myself seeking out the foot brake that is on the Helix. Big thing I realized that I need to train myself on is the use of both my hands during braking, along with slow speed maneuvering.

But, again, you guys are right.... safety is very important and something that one needs to remember to put on their pre-ride list. My son did ask me if I was going to put on my riding jacket. I have trained my son to always wear seatbelts while in a vehicle, even though I was raised without seatbelts. And I rarely wear them when driving locally by myself. So, as you can see.... old dogs have old habits. Just keep reminding me. One day it will sink in.

My first crash was on a moped. And you are right. My hands took the brunt. And even though I was wearing a helmet, my head went to an angle where my chin was still dragged across the gravel. Came away with some nice road burn on my chin and palms. Learned real fast how to do U-turns on a gravel driveway. :oops:
 

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Captain,
That's why full-face helmets are essential, even though they are sometimes hot, inconvenient with eyeglasses, heavy and look dorky. I also still have some subcutaneoulsy embedded gravel particles left over from some very old spills on gravel. There are also a few burn scars from the bike ending up on top of me.
 

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I totally agree with the statement that getting used to NO foot brake will take some getting used to. Yesterday, while riding with my buddy, we were going through a really bad intersection, and of course some kid cut in front of us turning left. I heard Richard locking up his brakes, and I instinctivly went to hit my foot brake. I **** near plowed into the back of Richard before I remembered to use both hand brakes.
This bike sure is ALOT different then a regular cycle. I also found that it is very sensitive to body movement. Much more respnsive. After about 50 miles, I did get the hang of it though. I'm sure after a few hundred miles I'll be totally used to it.
Yes, at first I did keep wanted to pull the clutch in and shift, and yes, once when leaving a restaurant, I did wamp on the throttle a bit, and remembered, after learching forward, that I can't do that anymore either. :oops: :oops:
major learnign curve with this puppy. Hopefully I'll get the hang of it, hopefully without killing myself in the process. :lol: :lol:
 

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docta said:
...full-face helmets...look dorky. ...
Nah! Those scooter-style half-helmets look dorky.

Full face helmets (especially a silver HJC flip-up helmet that perfectly matches a certain silver Suzuki Burgman 650) look cool. 8)
 

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captainfish said:
...Speaking of old habits.... I found myself seeking out the foot brake that is on the Helix. ...
wilder days said:
I totally agree with the statement that getting used to NO foot brake will take some getting used to. Yesterday, while riding with my buddy, we were going through a really bad intersection, and of course some kid cut in front of us turning left. I heard Richard locking up his brakes, and I instinctivly went to hit my foot brake. ...
A lot of us have done that. I hadn't ridden anything on two wheels in almost 15 years when I bought my Burgman, and yet for the first several days I kept wanting to step on the phantom rear brake pedal.

I think it's partly reinforced by the fact that on the cars, trucks, and buses I drive I also use a right-foot brake pedal.

Fortunately for the public, I've never gone for phantom hand brakes on a 60 foot, 80,000 pound, articulated motorcoach. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Brian,
Your little footer on your postings remind me of my purchase. My bike was delivered with 1 mile on Odometer. I think it rounded up since the bike was only ridden to the front of the store for display. So, I believe my bike had less than a mile on it when delivered. So I am more than comfortable in saying these definitately was the first 3 miles this bike has experienced.

Dang weather. We are supposed to get rain all this coming week. pooh! :x

I may even have to NOT take this baby to the meeting in BOW, WA. Not till I get used to riding on wet roads. Also, I am still under the 600 mile service. I don't want to put too many hard highway miles on it before then. So, guess I will be stuck with the company car once again. Oh well, I haven't got all the extras and accessories yet either.
 

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I always ride with helmet, shoes, gloves and eye protection any time I'm going to go over neighborhood speeds. I've had everything from rocks, wooden palets and other road debris being kicked up at me, to cigarette buttt's being tossed into my path, to head on impacts with large insects and even larger birds to convince me that these things are not just for if you fall down...
 
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