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I have just purchased my 2012 Burgman and want to add Motolights for safety. I installed a set on the forks of my 2003 Vegas. This will be a caliper mount, but it is the wiring that I need help with. Can anyone tell me how much of this body work I need to take apart to get this done? I hate to strip it all off just to find out I didn't need to. I greatly appriciate any advice.
 

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Just take off the top box and the maintenance cover. Use a coat hanger straightened with a hook on the end. It takes some patience but you can thread the wires back to the battery pretty easily. I've done this on two 650s. I used Motolights on my 2007 and a Motolights bracket to attach LED lights the second time around (about $200 less than Motolights).
 

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In addition to pulling in your new wires, pull in an additional piece of Jetline or nylon cord to be left in place for the NEXT set of wires you may want to add.
Any time you snake in new wires, pull in a new pull cord for the next farkle. :wink:
 

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It's totally unnecessary to run a set of wires to the battery every time you add another device. Run one set from the battery to under the tupperware beneath the handlebars, add a fused block and a ground bar for future installs and be done with it. There's plenty of room for the wiring, I use velcro to attach the fuse block, and you end up with a neat wiring job that is easy to trouble shoot in the future, and that doesn't end up with hidden wiring laying all over the top of your motor. Also make sure you add a relay for the Motolights due to the voltage draw. Relays are solid state, totally encapsulated and waterproof, and seldom go bad. You can sleep at night knowing that you did the job right instead of half-assed.
 

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momule said:
It's totally unnecessary to run a set of wires to the battery every time you add another device. Run one set from the battery to under the tupperware beneath the handlebars, add a fused block and a ground bar for future installs and be done with it. There's plenty of room for the wiring, I use velcro to attach the fuse block, and you end up with a neat wiring job that is easy to trouble shoot in the future, and that doesn't end up with hidden wiring laying all over the top of your motor. Also make sure you add a relay for the Motolights due to the voltage draw. Relays are solid state, totally encapsulated and waterproof, and seldom go bad. You can sleep at night knowing that you did the job right instead of half-assed.
Hi,
Can you tell me what relay you used and refer me to a diagram as to how to wire road lights into a 400? I want to do it right but must have skipped the classes the rest of you took on this sort of thing.
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, it’s time I posted a reply to my own question since I completed the installation of the Motolights today. I’m going to be as detailed as I can here since I didn’t go to school for it either. I do appreciate the responses I got even though they were not detailed enough to be of much help. (I even called Motolights and was referred to Mike (the Burgman expert who said “Why don’t you just let me do it”. To which I replied, “I’m in North Carolina and you’re in Florida, Duh!”) I used this link to Burgman 650 service manual ( http://ics07.ac.upc.edu/aramirez/lib/ex ... man650.pdf
My install was very simple. I did not want to switch the Motolights separate from the ignition. The motos come on just like the head lights. I began by removing the seat damper pin and then propping the seat as far forward as possible. Next, unseat the battery cover. Now remove the battery – negative lead from the battery and secure it away from the battery. You can now remove the rest of the leads attached to the battery cover and disconnect the hard wired connector. Now that the battery cover is out, remove the + positive lead to the battery and lift the battery out of bike. You can now disconnect the trunk light connector. Next, remove the 4 nuts holding the seat on. Remove the seat. Remove the maintenance cover. Now remove the 4 screws holding the trunk box. Remove the trunk box. Under the trunk box is all the space needed for the Motolights wiring harness. Place the fuse and relay in the fuse space on the left side. Run the light connector lead forward to the lower left where the oil filler cap is. Now install the lights to the lower caliper bolts on both sides of the bike and cable tie the leads neatly to the brake lines. They should exit the front wheel together on the left up at the hard brake line. Feed the connectors through the opening at the left of the radiator, into the space where the oil filler cap is. Cable tie the lines and the harness connector to the other wiring in this space to prevent stress on the connections. Connect the lines to the harness connector. Now, back under the trunk box I found a 4 wire connector and harness that runs back on the left side. These are the brake and tail light wires. I cut off the Motolights switch lead and scotch locked that lead to the gray wire in the tail light harness. (M y bike is 2012 Executive, others may differ). After a temporary battery re-connect to check the lights operation, I put it all back together in reverse order. Hope this helps someone.
Thanks again to everyone who responded.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Keith,
You'll just have to suck it up and do it. I did. All the PIC's you need are in pdf service manual link I posted. Look in section 9-chassis. Good luck.
 

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pdxstriper said:
momule said:
It's totally unnecessary to run a set of wires to the battery every time you add another device. Run one set from the battery to under the tupperware beneath the handlebars, add a fused block and a ground bar for future installs and be done with it. There's plenty of room for the wiring, I use velcro to attach the fuse block, and you end up with a neat wiring job that is easy to trouble shoot in the future, and that doesn't end up with hidden wiring laying all over the top of your motor. Also make sure you add a relay for the Motolights due to the voltage draw. Relays are solid state, totally encapsulated and waterproof, and seldom go bad. You can sleep at night knowing that you did the job right instead of half-assed.
Hi,
Can you tell me what relay you used and refer me to a diagram as to how to wire road lights into a 400? I want to do it right but must have skipped the classes the rest of you took on this sort of thing.
Pete
Pete and Keith -

The relay that you should use is a 30W generic relay available from any auto parts store. These are simple, non-userservicable devices but are necessary to prevent damage to your bikes wiring harness should you be using the bikes horn switch or light switch. It just prevents overloading of the OEM wiring harnesses. If you look at https://sites.google.com/site/testburgmancenter02/ you will find a wonderful collection of Burgman information and how-to's put together by our fellow member LeDude. If you can't find it at his site there probably isn't another place available anywhere to find the right information.

I'm not hugely mechanically minded but with the help already available online I have found that I can do things that I never would have tried otherwise. You've taken the first right steps by being here and asking for help.
 

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Moochy2013 said:
Ok, it’s time I posted a reply to my own question since I completed the installation of the Motolights today. I’m going to be as detailed as I can here since I didn’t go to school for it either. I do appreciate the responses I got even though they were not detailed enough to be of much help. (I even called Motolights and was referred to Mike (the Burgman expert who said “Why don’t you just let me do it”. To which I replied, “I’m in North Carolina and you’re in Florida, Duh!”) I used this link to Burgman 650 service manual ( http://ics07.ac.upc.edu/aramirez/lib/ex ... man650.pdf
My install was very simple. I did not want to switch the Motolights separate from the ignition. The motos come on just like the head lights. I began by removing the seat damper pin and then propping the seat as far forward as possible. Next, unseat the battery cover. Now remove the battery – negative lead from the battery and secure it away from the battery. You can now remove the rest of the leads attached to the battery cover and disconnect the hard wired connector. Now that the battery cover is out, remove the + positive lead to the battery and lift the battery out of bike. You can now disconnect the trunk light connector. Next, remove the 4 nuts holding the seat on. Remove the seat. Remove the maintenance cover. Now remove the 4 screws holding the trunk box. Remove the trunk box. Under the trunk box is all the space needed for the Motolights wiring harness. Place the fuse and relay in the fuse space on the left side. Run the light connector lead forward to the lower left where the oil filler cap is. Now install the lights to the lower caliper bolts on both sides of the bike and cable tie the leads neatly to the brake lines. They should exit the front wheel together on the left up at the hard brake line. Feed the connectors through the opening at the left of the radiator, into the space where the oil filler cap is. Cable tie the lines and the harness connector to the other wiring in this space to prevent stress on the connections. Connect the lines to the harness connector. Now, back under the trunk box I found a 4 wire connector and harness that runs back on the left side. These are the brake and tail light wires. I cut off the Motolights switch lead and scotch locked that lead to the gray wire in the tail light harness. (M y bike is 2012 Executive, others may differ). After a temporary battery re-connect to check the lights operation, I put it all back together in reverse order. Hope this helps someone.
Thanks again to everyone who responded.

Moochy - I don't know why you find it necessary to put the motolight wiring harness under the seat box. It sure seems like you made a lot of extra work for yourself by removing the battery, the seat, the seat box etc when all you really needed to do is put the relay and harness under the handlebar cover. Maybe I'm missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
" momule wrote:

Moochy - I don't know why you find it necessary to put the motolight wiring harness under the seat box. It sure seems like you made a lot of extra work for yourself by removing the battery, the seat, the seat box etc when all you really needed to do is put the relay and harness under the handlebar cover. Maybe I'm missing something?


In your previous post you suggested running one set of wires from the battery to beneath the handlebar cover to add a fuse block and a ground bar for future installs. Didn't you have to go under the trunk box and maintenace cover to run your wiring?
 

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Moochy2013 said:
" momule wrote:

Moochy - I don't know why you find it necessary to put the motolight wiring harness under the seat box. It sure seems like you made a lot of extra work for yourself by removing the battery, the seat, the seat box etc when all you really needed to do is put the relay and harness under the handlebar cover. Maybe I'm missing something?


In your previous post you suggested running one set of wires from the battery to beneath the handlebar cover to add a fuse block and a ground bar for future installs. Didn't you have to go under the trunk box and maintenace cover to run your wiring?

Yes, but I only ran one set of 10 guage wires from the battery to the front instead of running a new set for every farkle. The engine space under the maintenance cover is pretty full but it is open through to the battery so all you have to remove is the maintenance cover. I routed the single pair of wires and covered it with a flexible wire loom cover to protect it from sharp edges and wire tied it out of the way. It's admittedly a bit anal to do that but it beats running a new wire every time and prevents all that wire from cluttering up the engine compartment. From a career of doing wiring work for Bell Telephone I found that a neat job is usually one that will also be trouble free in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
momule said:
Moochy2013 said:
" momule wrote:

Moochy - I don't know why you find it necessary to put the motolight wiring harness under the seat box. It sure seems like you made a lot of extra work for yourself by removing the battery, the seat, the seat box etc when all you really needed to do is put the relay and harness under the handlebar cover. Maybe I'm missing something?


In your previous post you suggested running one set of wires from the battery to beneath the handlebar cover to add a fuse block and a ground bar for future installs. Didn't you have to go under the trunk box and maintenace cover to run your wiring?

Yes, but I only ran one set of 10 guage wires from the battery to the front instead of running a new set for every farkle. The engine space under the maintenance cover is pretty full but it is open through to the battery so all you have to remove is the maintenance cover. I routed the single pair of wires and covered it with a flexible wire loom cover to protect it from sharp edges and wire tied it out of the way. It's admittedly a bit anal to do that but it beats running a new wire every time and prevents all that wire from cluttering up the engine compartment. From a career of doing wiring work for Bell Telephone I found that a neat job is usually one that will also be trouble free in the long run.

Yes, but I don't do Farkle. Motolights, grips, new seat, topbox and windshield and I'm done. Though it seems we have more in common than I would thought. I have 34 years with Verizon this month. As a COT, I'd match my DSX against yours any day.
 
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