Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just back from 3000 k trip with the pipe on. (Went to the Ulysses AGM, in Oz (Ulysses is an Aussie club for over 40's)). Report on the Mori pipe. First, Noise. Holey Dooley, when the rpms hit 7000, turns into a SCREAM, also with quite a bit more GO. Power increase at this range is noticeable. A nice rumble at idle, then progressively more noise. the scoot has picked up a bit more power, how much is anyones guess, but it is more responsive. It also tends to backfire just off overun at the point between power on and off, mostly at low speeds. (With the standard pipe this also happened when in Power mode on the auto, but with the Mori on it is more noticeable) Possibly with re chipping this would not happen.
It is reasonably quiet when sitting at speed on a level road. The economy is around about the same at approx 20 km/litre (two up loaded to the hilt).
Koni shocks - are available from any dealer in Australia, they are now called IKON and are made in Victoria, Australia. The scoot used to bottom out when two up with the standard shocks, but now doesn't happen. Also now have adjustable damping. Fournales also make shocks for the Burger, full Air shocks. Photos of the scoot with the Moriwaki pipe on are ours, Also fitted armrests for the boss on the back. Catch you all later. Geoff from Tasmania
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Ikon shocks for 650

Geoff,

I need the part number for the IKON shocks for the Burgman 650. There is a US Distributor for IKON - Eurotech Motorsports -http://www.eurotechmotorsports.com/ .

I exchanged email with them, but they don't have the Burgman 650 listed on their application chart. If I can get the part number they will try to track down a set for me.

I used Koni's before and they are good. Progressively wound springs and adjustable damping as well as adjustable preload. Very sophisticated compared to the stock shocks we have. Anyone else who is interested might want to email them also at [email protected] . Perhaps they will try harder if they see that several folks are in the market for these shocks.

But if Geoff, or anyone else, can come up with the part number it could save us a lot of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Koni Shock Part Number

The Ikon part number is 7610-1413.
Standard shock, 3mm shorter than the stock burger shock, but with neavier spring (Ikon 213) on the spring. Hope this helps. The damping adjustment I fitted on the INSIDE on the shock. (ie Turn it around so the adjuster is on the inside.) I leave it set on 3 for us, find it easier to take shock off to adjust. They work better than the stock ones. Cheers from Tassie, Geoff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Re: Koni Shock Part Number

Zook650 said:
The Ikon part number is 7610-1413.
They work better than the stock ones. Cheers from Tassie, Geoff
You could have quite a business exporting them to USA.

BTW, I hear that Tasmania is a paradise, and that famous ambassador from Tasmania, The Tasmanian devil, can be domesticated and makes an excellent pet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I e-mailed Eurotech and Chris Canterbury replied that they could order the shocks from Ikon. Retail price $349.00 pr. If we can get 10 people from the list to order, he can get the price down to about $295.00. Any USA members interested?

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Burger Bob said:
I e-mailed Eurotech and Chris Canterbury replied that they could order the shocks from Ikon. Retail price $349.00 pr. If we can get 10 people from the list to order, he can get the price down to about $295.00. Any USA members interested?
Bob
Yes,

I definitely want a set. Chris hasn't gotten back to me yet, but I'll sent him an email right away.

For others who might be interested, his email address is [email protected]

If anyone still participates in the Yahoo Burgman forum (I don't anymore),
please post this information there too. May be we can scare up a few customers from that area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Ikon Shock length

I'm very keen to get involved in the price but...

The Ikon part number is 7610-1413.
Standard shock, 3mm shorter than the stock burger shock, but with neavier spring (Ikon 213) on the spring
I noticed that with softer spring settings on the rear, my burger gets twitchy at low speed. Softer means lower at the rear affecting the steering angle.

If I jack 'em up to position 3, 4 or 5, she becomes more predictable (ie higher at the rear).

I would prefer the shock absorber to be:

a) 3mm longer stroke and
b) 3mm longer length

rather than shorter.

Going shorter is making the better shock work harder.

I've played around a lot with suspension in my time and little things make a big difference, even moving the lower shock mounting point forward half an inch combined with better, longer travel shocks.

Confirming that again: Little adjustments!

nev

Perth Western Australia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
It also tends to backfire just off overun at the point between power on and off, mostly at low speeds. (With the standard pipe this also happened when in Power mode on the auto, but with the Mori on it is more noticeable)
If you listen for it on the standard pipe, it is there quite a lot too, but like you say, much more noticeable on a noisy exhaust.

This very fragile section of the engine management map where fuelling is re-instated after "over-run cut" is extremely difficult for engineers to control.

It comes out of the over-run cut (zero fuelling) condition to a condition where fuel injection is re-instated at very low levels to start the idle condition.

Instant combustion is difficult to garantee.

If you wind it on hard, it lurches forward (because there is no fuel in the air inlet system, short as it maybe), but if you accelerate lightly, you will hear a little "clack" as the gear train takes up the slack. Very cute really and far more acoustically pleasing than chain snatch.

Additionally large mufflers like the burger (and others like Yamaha XTZ 660 with both standard and sports exhaust) are ripe for small pockets of fuel to collect and randomly pop away under light load, trailing throttle conditions.

Light load is where combution control is most difficult to achieve, therefore unburnt fuel and excess Oxygen enters the exhaust.

Cars have catalysts that burn this unburnt fuel and you never hear it.

I suspect the European Burger models with catalysts don't have popping either.

nev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Spacey,

3 mm is a very small amount. The stiffer spring (progressively wound), and the superior damping more than make up for that shortfall in length. They don't sack out as bad as the stock shocks when you sit on the machine, and mine are set to the lightest preload. My 650 copes with the rough road surfaces much better now, and handling is still excellent.

As far as I can determine, that 3mm difference in length is a non-issue.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top